counter create hit Worthy of the Nation: Washington, DC, from L'Enfant to the National Capital Planning Commission - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Worthy of the Nation: Washington, DC, from L'Enfant to the National Capital Planning Commission

Availability: Ready to download

When Worthy of the Nation first appeared in 1977, it won much acclaim for its comprehensive treatment of Washington's design and urban development. Now the story has been brought up to the present, tracing the first thirty years of home rule for the District through the completion of the National Museum of the American Indian and the World War II Memorial in the early twen When Worthy of the Nation first appeared in 1977, it won much acclaim for its comprehensive treatment of Washington's design and urban development. Now the story has been brought up to the present, tracing the first thirty years of home rule for the District through the completion of the National Museum of the American Indian and the World War II Memorial in the early twenty-first century. Frederick Gutheim and Antoinette J. Lee begin with L'Enfant's survey of 1791, the uneven growth of Washington City as an early port, its rapid expansion during the Civil War, and the McMillan Plan of 1901–1902, inspired by the City Beautiful movement. They consider the close relationship between the growth in national ambitions and responsibilities and the density of the governmental presence—offices, facilities, military outposts, parks, and multiplying statuary and memorials. Gutheim and Lee also survey residential communities, commercial districts, and transportation infrastructure. They outline various efforts to shape and channel the phenomenal growth of the city during the twentieth century, including controversial attempts to rehabilitate some neighborhoods while largely destroying others in the name of urban renewal. Illustrated with plans, maps, and new and historic photographs, the second edition of Worthy of the Nation provides researchers and general readers with an appealing and authoritative view of the planning and evolution of the federal district.


Compare
Ads Banner

When Worthy of the Nation first appeared in 1977, it won much acclaim for its comprehensive treatment of Washington's design and urban development. Now the story has been brought up to the present, tracing the first thirty years of home rule for the District through the completion of the National Museum of the American Indian and the World War II Memorial in the early twen When Worthy of the Nation first appeared in 1977, it won much acclaim for its comprehensive treatment of Washington's design and urban development. Now the story has been brought up to the present, tracing the first thirty years of home rule for the District through the completion of the National Museum of the American Indian and the World War II Memorial in the early twenty-first century. Frederick Gutheim and Antoinette J. Lee begin with L'Enfant's survey of 1791, the uneven growth of Washington City as an early port, its rapid expansion during the Civil War, and the McMillan Plan of 1901–1902, inspired by the City Beautiful movement. They consider the close relationship between the growth in national ambitions and responsibilities and the density of the governmental presence—offices, facilities, military outposts, parks, and multiplying statuary and memorials. Gutheim and Lee also survey residential communities, commercial districts, and transportation infrastructure. They outline various efforts to shape and channel the phenomenal growth of the city during the twentieth century, including controversial attempts to rehabilitate some neighborhoods while largely destroying others in the name of urban renewal. Illustrated with plans, maps, and new and historic photographs, the second edition of Worthy of the Nation provides researchers and general readers with an appealing and authoritative view of the planning and evolution of the federal district.

32 review for Worthy of the Nation: Washington, DC, from L'Enfant to the National Capital Planning Commission

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tim Evanson

  2. 4 out of 5

    Philip

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jordan White

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sindi

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lee Munnich

  6. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Abulhawa

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joe

  9. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  11. 5 out of 5

    Matt Tenanty

  12. 5 out of 5

    Aliza

  13. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

  14. 5 out of 5

    Will

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rt

  16. 4 out of 5

    Casey

  17. 4 out of 5

    Eric

  18. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

  19. 5 out of 5

    niticon

  20. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Gilmore

  21. 4 out of 5

    John

  22. 4 out of 5

    Adam

  23. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

  24. 4 out of 5

    Maria Fernanda Derntl

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  27. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Kracht

  28. 4 out of 5

    John

  29. 5 out of 5

    mona

  30. 5 out of 5

    Scott McClintock

  31. 5 out of 5

    Hamza

  32. 5 out of 5

    Jzebley

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.