counter create hit Walmart in China - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Walmart in China

Availability: Ready to download

Walmart and Made in China are practically synonymous; Walmart imports some 70 percent of its merchandise from China. Walmart is now also rapidly becoming a major retail presence there, with close to two hundred Walmarts in more than a hundred Chinese cities. What happens when the world's biggest retailer and the world's biggest country do business with each other? In this Walmart and Made in China are practically synonymous; Walmart imports some 70 percent of its merchandise from China. Walmart is now also rapidly becoming a major retail presence there, with close to two hundred Walmarts in more than a hundred Chinese cities. What happens when the world's biggest retailer and the world's biggest country do business with each other? In this book, a group of thirteen experts from several disciplines examine the symbiotic but strained relationship between these giants. The book shows how Walmart began cutting costs by bypassing its American suppliers and sourcing directly from Asia and how Walmart's sheer size has trumped all other multinationals in squeezing procurement prices and, as a by-product, driving down Chinese workers' wages. China is also an inviting frontier for Walmart's global superstore expansion. As China's middle class grows, the chain's Western image and affordable goods have become popular. Walmart's Arkansas headquarters exports to the Chinese stores a unique corporate culture and management ideology, which oddly enough are reminiscent of Mao-era Chinese techniques for promoting loyalty. Three chapters separately detail the lives of a Walmart store manager, a lower-level store supervisor, and a cashier. Another chapter focuses on employees' wages, voluntary overtime, and the stores' strict labor discipline. In 2006, the official Chinese trade union targeted Walmart, which is antilabor in its home country, and succeeded in setting up union branches in all the stores. Walmart in China reveals the surprising outcome.


Compare

Walmart and Made in China are practically synonymous; Walmart imports some 70 percent of its merchandise from China. Walmart is now also rapidly becoming a major retail presence there, with close to two hundred Walmarts in more than a hundred Chinese cities. What happens when the world's biggest retailer and the world's biggest country do business with each other? In this Walmart and Made in China are practically synonymous; Walmart imports some 70 percent of its merchandise from China. Walmart is now also rapidly becoming a major retail presence there, with close to two hundred Walmarts in more than a hundred Chinese cities. What happens when the world's biggest retailer and the world's biggest country do business with each other? In this book, a group of thirteen experts from several disciplines examine the symbiotic but strained relationship between these giants. The book shows how Walmart began cutting costs by bypassing its American suppliers and sourcing directly from Asia and how Walmart's sheer size has trumped all other multinationals in squeezing procurement prices and, as a by-product, driving down Chinese workers' wages. China is also an inviting frontier for Walmart's global superstore expansion. As China's middle class grows, the chain's Western image and affordable goods have become popular. Walmart's Arkansas headquarters exports to the Chinese stores a unique corporate culture and management ideology, which oddly enough are reminiscent of Mao-era Chinese techniques for promoting loyalty. Three chapters separately detail the lives of a Walmart store manager, a lower-level store supervisor, and a cashier. Another chapter focuses on employees' wages, voluntary overtime, and the stores' strict labor discipline. In 2006, the official Chinese trade union targeted Walmart, which is antilabor in its home country, and succeeded in setting up union branches in all the stores. Walmart in China reveals the surprising outcome.

31 review for Walmart in China

  1. 5 out of 5

    Marks54

    This is a collection of papers from a conference of critical and regional scholars looking at the first ten years of Walmart in China. The book is organized into three sections. The first has papers of general interest and background. The second considers the perspective of managers and workers in Walmart in China. The third section has papers looking at issues related to unionization and Walmart in China. The papers are uniformly critical of Walmart, although some acknowledge changes in the fir This is a collection of papers from a conference of critical and regional scholars looking at the first ten years of Walmart in China. The book is organized into three sections. The first has papers of general interest and background. The second considers the perspective of managers and workers in Walmart in China. The third section has papers looking at issues related to unionization and Walmart in China. The papers are uniformly critical of Walmart, although some acknowledge changes in the firm's behavior over time. The methodology is largely descriptive/ethnographic with few if any statistics and no statistical analysis. The theoretical frameworks of the papers overall adopt a perspective of power and exploitation regarding Walmart with policy discussions oriented towards how to exert any controls to moderate Walmart's exploitative behaviors. (As an aside, this perspective of economic sociology is not without merit and is a good counterpoint to the capitalist cheerleader writings that one sees in the economics and business press.) What did I like about it? The papers provides some newer local information and some interesting testimonials, especially from the workers and managers. Walmart's management of human resources is a major issue with the firm globally and this volume provides some useful additional inputs for a constructive discussion, especially given the importance of Walmart in China. In addition, the papers are better written than is usually the case for an academic conference volume. What didn't I like about it? The almost complete absence of an economic perspective made the chapters less useful than they could have been. After reading these, one is tempted to ask -- "So what?" Any answer to that is going to require a consider how the economic markets in China are evolving. For example, you can complain all you wish about the poor conditions for workers, but even if the facts of those complaints were granted, the question to ask is what the choices of the workers in China are. If they have lots of other choices better than Walmart, then why don't they leave? If it is so bad, then why do so many travel so far (internal migration is huge) to work at Walmart? It is hard to make sense of the complaints without knowing the context facing the workers. The need to better develop the local context is also important for comparisons with the US, which occur throughout the book. For example, the chapter by Eileen Otis is one of the best crafted in the book. In it, she and her brave research assistant sketch out two different control regimes -- one for cashiers and one for sales people and contractors not tied technologically to one position. It all sounded fine until I remembered the last time I went shopping at a big box in the US -- two days ago -- and saw what would appear to be the same control mechanisms on display at COSTCO as are described for Walmart in Kummin. So is this a problem with Walmart in China? with Walmart generally? with big box retailers? How are these control technologies employed in the US? Overall, while the book provided me with additional information, it did not provide anything new at all in the way of frameworks to use in thinking about Walmart. Without that, the exercise gets predictable. Business school professors and consultants will like and even admire Walmart while "Critical" scholars will have nothing but contempt for Walmart. In the meantime, the public will continue to shop there and people in need of work in troubled times will continue to work there in the absence of credible alternatives. A good read but one that has outsourced a lot of the necessary thinking to the reader.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kier O'Neil

    Not the hatchet job I thought it was going to be. Fairly well balanced depiction of Walmart's involvement in China from their use of manufacturers to opening stores to working with the unions. Probably won't be of much interest to anyone without a strong feeling about Walmart one way or another. Not the hatchet job I thought it was going to be. Fairly well balanced depiction of Walmart's involvement in China from their use of manufacturers to opening stores to working with the unions. Probably won't be of much interest to anyone without a strong feeling about Walmart one way or another.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Deidre

  4. 5 out of 5

    Irene Ta

  5. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

  6. 5 out of 5

    Shigufa

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tithi

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Hall

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mike Connolly

  11. 5 out of 5

    Anikka

  12. 4 out of 5

    avidreader

  13. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

  14. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jason Manford

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jess

  17. 4 out of 5

    David Dayton

  18. 5 out of 5

    Aishe

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christine

  20. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

  21. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

  22. 5 out of 5

    Chaoticreader

  23. 4 out of 5

    Eduardo

  24. 5 out of 5

    Michael Regan

  25. 5 out of 5

    Myrna

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bo

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mallika Samtani

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

  29. 4 out of 5

    Giang Nguyen

  30. 5 out of 5

    Phil

  31. 5 out of 5

    LPenting

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.