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The Naked Woman: A Study of the Female Body

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Internationally bestselling author and world-famous human behaviorist Desmond Morris turns his attention to the female form, taking the reader on a guided tour of the female body from head to toe. Highlighting the evolutionary functions of various physiological traits, Morris's study explores the various forms of enhancement and constraint that human societies have develop Internationally bestselling author and world-famous human behaviorist Desmond Morris turns his attention to the female form, taking the reader on a guided tour of the female body from head to toe. Highlighting the evolutionary functions of various physiological traits, Morris's study explores the various forms of enhancement and constraint that human societies have developed in the quest for the perfect female form. This is very much vintage Desmond Morris, delivered in his trademark voice: direct, clear, focused, and communicating what is often complex detail in simple language. In THE NAKED WOMAN, Desmond builds on his unrivalled experience as an observer of the human animal while tackling one of his most fascinating and challenging subjects to date.


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Internationally bestselling author and world-famous human behaviorist Desmond Morris turns his attention to the female form, taking the reader on a guided tour of the female body from head to toe. Highlighting the evolutionary functions of various physiological traits, Morris's study explores the various forms of enhancement and constraint that human societies have develop Internationally bestselling author and world-famous human behaviorist Desmond Morris turns his attention to the female form, taking the reader on a guided tour of the female body from head to toe. Highlighting the evolutionary functions of various physiological traits, Morris's study explores the various forms of enhancement and constraint that human societies have developed in the quest for the perfect female form. This is very much vintage Desmond Morris, delivered in his trademark voice: direct, clear, focused, and communicating what is often complex detail in simple language. In THE NAKED WOMAN, Desmond builds on his unrivalled experience as an observer of the human animal while tackling one of his most fascinating and challenging subjects to date.

30 review for The Naked Woman: A Study of the Female Body

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Desmond's theories blew me away. They just make so much sense to me! I love it. I loved his thoughts on hair in particular... Human hair just doesn't make any sense at all when you compare us to the other primates. His explainations always sound reasonable and what's more - he can put his thoughts down in an interesting and fun way.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Ellis

    everyone should read this to know how and why we are the way we are - extremely interesting!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Vyff

    I recommend owning this book, along with The Naked Man -so you can read them at the same time. The chapters about the various parts of the body are in the same order, and it is great to go back and forth comparing the evolution of features in men, with the same features in women.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Roth

    As usual, Morris shows very sloppy thinking in how he handles the interaction between nature and culture, a flaw he shares with many primatologists and evolutionary psychologists. When he discusses cross-cultural or historical differences in body image patterns and practices, he never questions whether universality or large statistical preponderance among cultures is sufficient to say that an attitude or practice is evolutionarily dictated or not. The only exception to this is his invocation of As usual, Morris shows very sloppy thinking in how he handles the interaction between nature and culture, a flaw he shares with many primatologists and evolutionary psychologists. When he discusses cross-cultural or historical differences in body image patterns and practices, he never questions whether universality or large statistical preponderance among cultures is sufficient to say that an attitude or practice is evolutionarily dictated or not. The only exception to this is his invocation of a very ethnocentric view of cross-cultural differences in female body-covering, foot-binding, infibulation, etc.; I agree with his opinion of these practices, but he does not theorize these discussions and they are out of tone with the rest of the book. He's not curious why some patriarchal societies resort to extreme covering-up and mutilation of women and others don't. In sum, Morris is not like many evolutionary psychologists or primatologists who are biological determinists—he's not that, he acknowledges that culture plays a role—but he seems terribly uninterested in exploring what the exact dynamic is between biology and culture. That having been said, for the lay reader there are lots of interesting discussions of changing fashions in female body care and attitudes, including an extremely up to date discussion of pubic depilation and topiary. But the body-part-by-body-part organization of the chapters means that there is no general discussion of female body image at all, e.g. the question of fat vs. skinny. This is of course one of the huge issues in this area of study and he barely touches on it. Lastly, I would complain that in places Morris's editorializing about changing women's fashions are sometimes retrograde and undiplomatic. He's perfectly free to be glad that 1980s power-suit shoulder pads went out of fashion, but the way he links it to whether a woman desires to be "feminine" or not makes him sound pompous, lecherous, and out of step. And if I react that way as a male reader, I'll bet many female readers were thinking, in places, things like, "Ick! Who wants to hear if some 70-year-old professor thinks the lower back is the sexiest part of the body?" His publisher should have assigned him a female co-author. But if it were to be a grad student, she'd better make sure the office door is kept open. This book is recommended for all dirty old men of a scholarly bent.

  5. 5 out of 5

    María Paz Greene F

    ¡Qué libro genial! Uno de mis FAVORITOS. Lo que hace básicamente es ir paso por paso (pedazo por pedazo, jajaja) analizando el cuerpo de la mujer y por qué es así. O en otras palabras, qué truquillos hemos desarrollado para poder ser atractivas y asegurar la sobrevivencia de la raza, muajaja. Sí, sé que suena machista, pero no lo es en realidad, porque hay otro libro que trata exclusivamente del cuerpo de los galanes. Aunque, desgraciadamente, no he podido encontrarlo. En fin, que ME ENCANTÓ. MUY ¡Qué libro genial! Uno de mis FAVORITOS. Lo que hace básicamente es ir paso por paso (pedazo por pedazo, jajaja) analizando el cuerpo de la mujer y por qué es así. O en otras palabras, qué truquillos hemos desarrollado para poder ser atractivas y asegurar la sobrevivencia de la raza, muajaja. Sí, sé que suena machista, pero no lo es en realidad, porque hay otro libro que trata exclusivamente del cuerpo de los galanes. Aunque, desgraciadamente, no he podido encontrarlo. En fin, que ME ENCANTÓ. MUY RECOMENDADO. Hay un montón de curiosidades, y está increíblemente bien escrito, y abre la mente DE MUCHAS MANERAS. Yo se lo recomendaría a todo el mundo, porque hace que uno tenga más curiosidad por todas las cosas. Es tan entretenido y decidor. Hace que uno se acuerde de que la vida y la naturaleza tienen un motivo para el cual ser TAL CUAL ES. Y además, hace que uno se ría de sí mismo, cuando se da cuenta de que ha estado haciendo TODO LO QUE EL LIBRO DIJO QUE UNO HARÍA, de un modo u otro. Es decir, que las mujeres sí estamos al tanto de los efectos que podemos provocar haciendo o siendo una cosa u otra, jajaja, sea de un modo consciente o no. Muajaja. Nos pillaste chanchito, Desmond Morris. Pero, a nuestro favor, los hombres son igual de obvios. El lenguaje implícito nos toca a todos.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sehar Moughal

    I have ambiguous feelings about the explanations provided by Desmond; I love that his text made sense and almost everyone would understand because of the simplicity in his writing. Yet, I cringed at every generalization made. I would describe the book as a wok filled with food; every time you shake it, variety of food comes to the surface. The text is rich and colourful. It is filled with history, ancient tales and beliefs, biology and theories of why women are the way they are...Oh, and there a I have ambiguous feelings about the explanations provided by Desmond; I love that his text made sense and almost everyone would understand because of the simplicity in his writing. Yet, I cringed at every generalization made. I would describe the book as a wok filled with food; every time you shake it, variety of food comes to the surface. The text is rich and colourful. It is filled with history, ancient tales and beliefs, biology and theories of why women are the way they are...Oh, and there are photos which help to visualise some of the ways that women have accessorized their naked bodies.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Clare

    Desmond Morris is a bit of a dirty old man - after reading this I felt I needed to take a shower, although there are some truly interesting insights into the female body if you can stand the grubby and voyeuristic tone.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ivo Fernandes

    This book is focused on the differences between the man average body and the female average body. But is not only about the body, the genres are also different in mind. The main thesis of the book is that before Adam Smith, Henry Ford, and all this society of specialization, the first division of labour that our species had, was between mans and womans, and that made that the natural selection for mans and womans were totally different in some aspects. Mans need to hunt, make big distances to gath This book is focused on the differences between the man average body and the female average body. But is not only about the body, the genres are also different in mind. The main thesis of the book is that before Adam Smith, Henry Ford, and all this society of specialization, the first division of labour that our species had, was between mans and womans, and that made that the natural selection for mans and womans were totally different in some aspects. Mans need to hunt, make big distances to gather food, take some risks in order to get food. Womans need to create the clothes so the tribes with womens with thinner and more accurate fingers had more chances to survive the winters and ice ages, womans shouldn't like to take risks, because their are responsible to give the offspring to the tribe, for example, if a tribe with 4 womens in fertile age and 4 mans could have 4 childs in two years, they could produce the same amount of childs without one of the mans, it was enough that one of the others was fertile and they could keep producing babies at the same rate, but without one fertile woman, the tribe would have less childs, and consequently, less chances of surviving and propagate their genes. A great idea is that man evolved to have the mind of a child, in order to take the risks that would generate the food that the tribe needs, and the woman evolved to have the body of a child, because with the body of the child they would trigger the protection instincts of the mans of the tribe, and a tribe with the more protection toward the womans, have more chances have a bigger offspring and consequently to propagate the genes.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Pietia

    Każda kobieta ma piękne ciało. Nie, nie przeczytałem tej książki by dopiero się o tym przekonać. Lata tzw. obserwacji uczestniczącej w tej kwestii zrobiły już swoje.... Jednak po lekturze utwierdziłem się w tym przekonaniu jeszcze bardziej. Brytyjski zoolog, autorytet w badaniach nad zachowaniem ludzi i zwierząt Desmond Morris niemal na każdej stronicy swojej książki udowadnia tę tezę, przedstawiając ciało kobiety jako wspaniały efekt końcowy ewolucji trwającej miliony lat. Dla mnie ta książka j Każda kobieta ma piękne ciało. Nie, nie przeczytałem tej książki by dopiero się o tym przekonać. Lata tzw. obserwacji uczestniczącej w tej kwestii zrobiły już swoje.... Jednak po lekturze utwierdziłem się w tym przekonaniu jeszcze bardziej. Brytyjski zoolog, autorytet w badaniach nad zachowaniem ludzi i zwierząt Desmond Morris niemal na każdej stronicy swojej książki udowadnia tę tezę, przedstawiając ciało kobiety jako wspaniały efekt końcowy ewolucji trwającej miliony lat. Dla mnie ta książka jest przewodnikiem i mapą zarazem, które zachłannie studiowałem w tej fascynującej podróży po kobiecym ciele, od północnych jego krańców wyznaczonych kępkami czy kaskadami włosów na głowie, po najbardziej na południe wysunięte przylądki palców u kobiecych stóp. Pomiędzy tymi biegunami całe bogactwo wzgórków i zagłębień, linii i dołeczków, a więc tych miejsc, które nie tylko odróżniają kobietę od mężczyzny, ale też stanowią o jej atrakcyjności w jego oczach. Dzięki lekturze "Nagiej kobiety" odbyłem też interesującą eskapadę w głąb historii. Dowiedziałem się które dołeczki uważano za odcisk palców Boga, który z palców poświęcony był Wenus, które części ciała nazywano kotłami Kupidyna, gdzie znajduje się romb Michaelisa a gdzie punkt A, znany również jako epicentrum, nie wspominając o punkcie G... jakie znaczenie w upowszechnieniu staników miał amerykański Zarząd Przemysłu Wojennego czy która część ciała Afrodyty została uhonorowana wzniesieniem świątyni w starożytnej Grecji. Pasjonująca lektura, warta każdej, poświęconej jej chwili. Warto, choćby tylko dlatego by mieć "możliwie pełny obraz najbardziej fascynującego obiektu w świecie- nagiej kobiety."

  10. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Haf

    Si has leído el mono desnudo, no tiene caso leer este, es muy repetitivo, pero si no lo has leído puede ser interesante, aunque considero el mono desnudo y el zoo humano mucho más interesantes por abarcar un área más grande, también es un poco raro que un hombre caiga en describir a la mujer porque hay pequeñas cosas que no siento que sean verdaderas, quizá sea porque ya no son tan actuales, por ejemplo dice que la danza del vientre es una danza masturbatoria para hacer que el sultán eyaculara y Si has leído el mono desnudo, no tiene caso leer este, es muy repetitivo, pero si no lo has leído puede ser interesante, aunque considero el mono desnudo y el zoo humano mucho más interesantes por abarcar un área más grande, también es un poco raro que un hombre caiga en describir a la mujer porque hay pequeñas cosas que no siento que sean verdaderas, quizá sea porque ya no son tan actuales, por ejemplo dice que la danza del vientre es una danza masturbatoria para hacer que el sultán eyaculara ya que era demasiado gordo para moverse solo y yo había leído hace poco que es una danza folklórica donde ni siquiera se tenía el vientre al descubierto, que esto se dio porque se trajo esa imagen exótica a Hollywood y de Hollywood de vuelta al oriente para darle a los occidentales lo que esperaban ver. También describe los genitales femeninos normales diciendo que es una raja y los labios mayores cubren a los menores, impidiendo verlos, y claro que esto es completamente falso, esta sólo es la imagen popular y puritana que conocen todos, diría que es más común que los labios menores salgan de los mayores. Y pues no sé, en todos los agujeros ve una vagina y te explica como todos en diferentes momentos del tiempo han visto vaginas en el ombligo, las orejas, la boca y bueno sí, pero se vuelve cansado tener un estudio sobre la mujer que sólo gira alrededor del sexo, y por qué las mujeres hemos sido consideradas bonitas y por qué excitamos tanto a los hombres. Repito, si vas a leer un libro de él, mejor lee otro

  11. 4 out of 5

    Siobhan O' Sullivan

    great book, some really obscure trivia! well worth the read

  12. 4 out of 5

    lucie

    everybody needs to read this book

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Nearly as good as "Naked Ape", but not as far reaching.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Emma Johnson

    While definitely interesting with the multiple theories and the historical significance of many actions, and even comical at some points, I can't say that, as a modern day woman, I enjoyed this book the entire time. The female body is praised, yes, and the biological excellence of the human figure is extolled in loving descriptions of our various appendages, yet the author adopts an unappealing, rather condescending tone. This always occurs when he allows opinion to influence his fact-based writ While definitely interesting with the multiple theories and the historical significance of many actions, and even comical at some points, I can't say that, as a modern day woman, I enjoyed this book the entire time. The female body is praised, yes, and the biological excellence of the human figure is extolled in loving descriptions of our various appendages, yet the author adopts an unappealing, rather condescending tone. This always occurs when he allows opinion to influence his fact-based writing. With a superior air, the author, who does not possess the female body he knows so much about, patronizes the reader, and assumes absolute authority over the human female. In many instances, this book would be disastrous for the recovering anorexic or bulimic to read. In a completely different vein, in a roundabout way, traditional gender roles are insinuated to be the correct "way" of life, as the author has been too influenced by culture. Yes, humans are specialized, and it is important to know the biological origins of this specialization, but in this era of equality where it was, astonishingly enough, discovered that certain acts are not limited to certain individuals, it's frustrating to read. It is also frustrating to see the female body solely as an object for (SPECIFICALLY!!) men to view with pleasure. It is dehumanizing. I suppose that was the point, but none the less, it was discouraging. I feel, if I read the male counterpart of this book, and men were treated the same way, I would feel more kindly towards this book. Despite the fact that, yes, we, as humans, are sexual creatures, the female body has other purposes besides (shockingly) being a breathing thing for the, again speCiFicAlLy!!, male to drool over and penetrate at his whim. As a sexual individual, yes, many actions I perform are intended to be sexual. However, despite having such a high libido, those specifically-sexual displays are (!!!) likely only 10% of my overall actions. I eat. I sprawl reading. I am more than an unwilling pile of skin for someone to shove their penis into. (I apologize for turning this review into a mild feminist rant). However, for the most part, I did enjoy the history of certain actions, and the portrayal of many viewpoints, as well as the appreciation of the female figure (despite the disappointing instances where it was not regarded as her own). I do understand the difficulty and delicacy of such a topic and I appreciate the importance of exposing varieties of inhumane mutilations and restrictions. This book exposes such actions, and, less importantly, serves as a crude road map to the female body for an ignorant female-fascinated male, or a slight exploration into history for anyone else.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Isra

    Desmond Morris logra, con este texto, explicar cómo es que el cuerpo de la mujer sufre modificaciones de acuerdo a la sociedad a la que pertenece y cómo algunas conductas son instaurdas de acuerdo a la cultura a la que pertenece. Puede haber sido escrito hace un tiempo, pero explica de manera muy completa muchos aspectos de la hembra humana.

  16. 4 out of 5

    amberle

    scorrevole, organizzato a brevi capitoletti (uno per ogni parte del corpo di interesse), pone uno sguardo scientifico su un qualcosa che diamo per scontato o che al contrario rivestiamo di significati "altri", ossia il corpo delle donne, trovando così una spiegazione (ma non una giustificazione) a certe aberrazioni che sono state e talora sono ancora praticate su di esso. da leggere.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Giorgos Tselios

    An extensive, straightforward, and unperturbed, yet scientifically prudent inquiry into each and every part of the naked female body, from head to toe.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jael

    Earlier this year before I graduated from my community college, a classmate in my Comparative Animal Behavior class recommended Desmond Morris to me (specifically this book and also the Naked Man). The book was interesting and Morris did explain the technical terms he used. One thing with biology in terms of evolution is the explanation of not only how something came about but also the why. Morris does delve into his opinion of the why of the human body, but sometimes he doesn't lay it out all a Earlier this year before I graduated from my community college, a classmate in my Comparative Animal Behavior class recommended Desmond Morris to me (specifically this book and also the Naked Man). The book was interesting and Morris did explain the technical terms he used. One thing with biology in terms of evolution is the explanation of not only how something came about but also the why. Morris does delve into his opinion of the why of the human body, but sometimes he doesn't lay it out all at once or at all. Morris will give you bits and pieces and you have to put it together yourself. Additionally, Morris also delves into the cultural significance of body parts of women. Some of the things he addressed, I didn't even know was done (for example drilling holes in ones own teeth to put jewels in). One thing that kind of bugged me has to do with Morris' references. What started it was Morris discussing belly dancing, specifically that belly dancing originated in the harem, due to a fat overlord and a concubine who had to do all work. Over time belly dancing 'developed into a visual display to titillate and excite the master of the harem.' Morris adds that some sources claim that belly dancing represents birth. Morris doesn't claim the former as his own or another sources (nor does Morris cite his sources). In the reference section, he notes a book on belly dancing from 1985. I had done my own searching and this harem idea, seems to have been popular back in the 70's. I looked at the Morris references and noted that (I could be wrong here)34 out of his 202 his references were published after 1995. This could be due to his referencing history in the text, but since he didn't cite anything, I can't be totally sure (this is what going to college does to you, your English teacher starts shouting in your head "cite your sources!"). Other than that, I really did enjoy reading this book. I think anybody interested in Biology/Biological Anthropology or evolution would get a kick out of this book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Old Man Aries

    "L'Animale Donna" è l'ultimo libro di Desmond Morris, grande etologo inglese che oltre ad aver studiato il comportamento animale si è dedicato per anni allo studio di quell'animale più unico che raro rappresentato dall'uomo.Dopo "La scimmia nuda", in cui ha iniziato questo viaggio di scoperta, "Il comportamento intimo", in cui ha approfondito i rapporti intimi tra esseri umani e "Lo zoo umano", dove ha analizzato le società moderne, lo studioso ha deciso di lanciarsi nella disamina di quella che "L'Animale Donna" è l'ultimo libro di Desmond Morris, grande etologo inglese che oltre ad aver studiato il comportamento animale si è dedicato per anni allo studio di quell'animale più unico che raro rappresentato dall'uomo.Dopo "La scimmia nuda", in cui ha iniziato questo viaggio di scoperta, "Il comportamento intimo", in cui ha approfondito i rapporti intimi tra esseri umani e "Lo zoo umano", dove ha analizzato le società moderne, lo studioso ha deciso di lanciarsi nella disamina di quella che è, a suo esplicito dire, la versione più evoluta dell'animale uomo: la donna.L'analisi è suddivisa in capitoli, in ognuno dei quali si va ad affrontare una parte del corpo femminile, se ne racconta le diversità rispetto a quello maschile e le usanze ad esso legate: da quelle più curiose a quelle più inquietante (tipo le fasciature dei piedi femminili che avvenivano fino a pochi decenni fa in Cina).Un viaggio affascinante, ammirato e mai sopra le righe, perfetto per apprendere qualche curiosità in più sulle nostre controparti e, perché no, ammirarle ancora un po' di più.Consigliato.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mac

    For those of you who judges a book by its cover and think that people reading this is a pervert, let me tell you that it's not what you think. There are some topless female in it, but they are there to represent female anatomy. I purchased it for the sake of curiosity; to understand better about women (as they are such complicated creatures). The (male) readers can understand how the brain of a female is wired, and how their distinctive emotions influence them through the course of their lives. For those of you who judges a book by its cover and think that people reading this is a pervert, let me tell you that it's not what you think. There are some topless female in it, but they are there to represent female anatomy. I purchased it for the sake of curiosity; to understand better about women (as they are such complicated creatures). The (male) readers can understand how the brain of a female is wired, and how their distinctive emotions influence them through the course of their lives. From having the first period - the time which most men need to be careful of - to menopause - also the time every men need to be very prudent with his words and actions. However, the book then went astray, discussing about common sense stuff that's not really important, which is why I gave it only 3 stars.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Veena

    The Naked Woman by Desmond Morris is a book every woman should read at least once. It explores the females body through its different sections. Morris describes the female frame in much detail literally from the hair to toe. But this is far from a boring anatomy read that it looks to be. The book entertains: be it through “women protruding their naked buttocks at the front door in the hope of warding off storms” or through other absurd stories about women offering males apples laced with armpit The Naked Woman by Desmond Morris is a book every woman should read at least once. It explores the females body through its different sections. Morris describes the female frame in much detail literally from the hair to toe. But this is far from a boring anatomy read that it looks to be. The book entertains: be it through “women protruding their naked buttocks at the front door in the hope of warding off storms” or through other absurd stories about women offering males apples laced with armpit sweat. Morris also delves into the evolution of the female form, drawing comparisons every now and then with the male as also to apes. The book wonderfully weaves a story around rituals and legends across the world; from the tribal regions to the western civilisation and keeps the reader hooked to the end. A recommended read!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Marjan

    Not being familiar with the author I expected something completely different, perhaps a bit more poetic journey trough the art and looks of femininity. Despite having some elements of that too, this book largely delivers a surface anatomy of female body in very anthropological terms. Each chapter examines one distinct part of female body in terms of its evolution, medical function and use, sexual appeal, gesturing, and finally its metaphorical meaning that penetrates our subconscious thinking, a Not being familiar with the author I expected something completely different, perhaps a bit more poetic journey trough the art and looks of femininity. Despite having some elements of that too, this book largely delivers a surface anatomy of female body in very anthropological terms. Each chapter examines one distinct part of female body in terms of its evolution, medical function and use, sexual appeal, gesturing, and finally its metaphorical meaning that penetrates our subconscious thinking, art, religion or simply everyday life. Although an avid reader may be already familiar with many of these features from other studies, it is still remarkable to read some surprising factoids and have them all collected in one volume.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Librarian Kate

    I read this as a companion piece to Morris's book "The Naked Man" (which was donated to the LGBT library I volunteer with), and although I'm a big fan on Desmond Morris in general, I thought this book was fascinating. He covers, literally from head to toes, the aspects of the female human body that are unique and amazing, and discusses the social and historical impact that different cultural attitudes toward each body part. For anyone who is interested in human cultural history, or who wants to I read this as a companion piece to Morris's book "The Naked Man" (which was donated to the LGBT library I volunteer with), and although I'm a big fan on Desmond Morris in general, I thought this book was fascinating. He covers, literally from head to toes, the aspects of the female human body that are unique and amazing, and discusses the social and historical impact that different cultural attitudes toward each body part. For anyone who is interested in human cultural history, or who wants to know more about social expectations of "female" people as expressed through physical characteristics, this is an entertaining and very informative book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Erasmusser

    I'm interested in evolution and biology, and this book is a nice extra to my collection. I have to admit that Mr. Morris is not always so accurate, and I doubt some of the things he claims. However; a substantial part of evolution is guessing, and some of his guessings make sense. I learned something about the female body, so I'm a happy man. I won't use it as a bible though. Next to that; the book is pleasantly written (read it in Dutch), no jargon so it's easy to read, and I like his style. Nex I'm interested in evolution and biology, and this book is a nice extra to my collection. I have to admit that Mr. Morris is not always so accurate, and I doubt some of the things he claims. However; a substantial part of evolution is guessing, and some of his guessings make sense. I learned something about the female body, so I'm a happy man. I won't use it as a bible though. Next to that; the book is pleasantly written (read it in Dutch), no jargon so it's easy to read, and I like his style. Next Morris book I will read is The Naked Man; A Study of the Male Body.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ram Kishor Poddar

    A concise masterpiece on Anthropology. Mr Morris is not only an authority on the subject but also knows hows to narrate it well. A very eye opening read. I would recommend it to be read chapterwise along with another book in same line " The Naked Man".This gives a wholesome picture on anatomy of both the sexes. A google search here and there while reading, throws some awinspiring aspects. I have always been a big fan of Desmond Morris and hats off to him for yet another masterpiece.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joe Henry

    At 80 years old, Desmond Morris is still at it. He began his career as a zoologist and was curator of Mammals at the London Zoo. His book, The Naked Ape, was an international best-seller that sold more than a million copies in 15 different languages. I generally find his stuff interesting and informative.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    I picked up this book thinking it would be interesting, and while it certainly started out that way, the author's one track mind eventually became a bit unsettling, and rather detracted from the whole reading experience. (Seriously, can he talk about sex a little bit less!)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Meghnad

    Desmond Morris is one of those writers that make you think so hard that your world is turned upside down. By lucidly explaining the Human animal, it's anatomy and juxtaposing it with Historical evidence, he manages to create a fairy-tale like narrative. Loved this book. Much recommended.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    A fascinating look at female anatomy. All parts explained by science, from the hair to the feet. It is written from a perspective in which female's sex partners are always male, but not in a judgy or demeaning way.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Zöe Zöe

    it's a nice book. but too many general information. also it reminds me Susan Sontag's "against interpretation" and "illness and its metaphor", there are too many things currently with metaphor. what if every part of our body is just the way it should be, no extra metaphor.

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