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New Mexico and the Civil War

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Although the New Mexico Territory was far distant from the main theaters of war, it was engulfed in the same violence and bloodshed as the rest of the nation. The Civil War in New Mexico was fought in the deserts and mountains of the huge territory, which was mostly wilderness, amid the continuing ancient wars against the wild Indian tribes waged by both sides. The armies Although the New Mexico Territory was far distant from the main theaters of war, it was engulfed in the same violence and bloodshed as the rest of the nation. The Civil War in New Mexico was fought in the deserts and mountains of the huge territory, which was mostly wilderness, amid the continuing ancient wars against the wild Indian tribes waged by both sides. The armies were small, but the stakes were high: control of the Southwest. Retired lieutenant colonel and Civil War historian Dr. Walter Earl Pittman presents this concise history of New Mexico during the Civil War years from the Confederate invasion of 1861 to the Battles of Valverde and Glorieta to the end of the war.


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Although the New Mexico Territory was far distant from the main theaters of war, it was engulfed in the same violence and bloodshed as the rest of the nation. The Civil War in New Mexico was fought in the deserts and mountains of the huge territory, which was mostly wilderness, amid the continuing ancient wars against the wild Indian tribes waged by both sides. The armies Although the New Mexico Territory was far distant from the main theaters of war, it was engulfed in the same violence and bloodshed as the rest of the nation. The Civil War in New Mexico was fought in the deserts and mountains of the huge territory, which was mostly wilderness, amid the continuing ancient wars against the wild Indian tribes waged by both sides. The armies were small, but the stakes were high: control of the Southwest. Retired lieutenant colonel and Civil War historian Dr. Walter Earl Pittman presents this concise history of New Mexico during the Civil War years from the Confederate invasion of 1861 to the Battles of Valverde and Glorieta to the end of the war.

38 review for New Mexico and the Civil War

  1. 5 out of 5

    Efrem Sepulveda

    Walter Pittman gives us a good introduction to the cmapaigns that marked the western battles of the Civil War (or War Between the States). This short 120-page book traces the route of Confederate General Sibley's thrust into the New Mexico Terrritory in hopes of cutting off gold supplies from California and Colorado and to embark on a quixotic dream of stretching Confederate power from coast to coast. Three battles are covered in short secession. The battle of Valverde with the seige of Fort Cra Walter Pittman gives us a good introduction to the cmapaigns that marked the western battles of the Civil War (or War Between the States). This short 120-page book traces the route of Confederate General Sibley's thrust into the New Mexico Terrritory in hopes of cutting off gold supplies from California and Colorado and to embark on a quixotic dream of stretching Confederate power from coast to coast. Three battles are covered in short secession. The battle of Valverde with the seige of Fort Craig, the skrimishs around Albuquerque and Santa Fe and the decisive battle at Glorieta Pass which resulted in a pyrrhic victory for the southern forces as their supply trains were unexpectedly destroyed by Colonel Chivington's Colorado forces dashing any hope of an assualt on Fort Union and also resulted in a hasty retreat all the way back into Texas. Further forays into New Mexico were talked about, but none came to frutition for the rest of the war. In addition to the text, there is a short bibliography which provides a helpful list of books that cover the campaigns in depth and a short index. A nice effort for an introduction to an oft forgotten part of the conflict that occurred 150 years ago.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Colin

    Well, whoever said that history is written by the victors didn't read this book. Perhaps I'm misinterpreting, of course, but from the tone throughout, I'd say Mr. Pittman isn't too pleased about who won the Civil War. Not that he's pro-slavery or anything, more like pro-South. Caught up in that chunk of men (almost always men) who have romanticized the deeds of an army that intended to spread the sin of slavery from coast to coast. Very odd. The smallest routine action by Confederate soldiers wi Well, whoever said that history is written by the victors didn't read this book. Perhaps I'm misinterpreting, of course, but from the tone throughout, I'd say Mr. Pittman isn't too pleased about who won the Civil War. Not that he's pro-slavery or anything, more like pro-South. Caught up in that chunk of men (almost always men) who have romanticized the deeds of an army that intended to spread the sin of slavery from coast to coast. Very odd. The smallest routine action by Confederate soldiers will get dubbed heroic in this book, such that you'd think the small force that invaded New Mexico in 1861-62 was chock full of gallants. Hell, he gives more space to the Union commander's wife, who did see to the sick and wounded Rebels after the big battle, than all the Yankee officers combined. And if he can find a way to take repeated digs at any of them, bet on him doing so, though he did note that the Rebel commander was a drunk coward, which was nice. On a more practical note, don't read this if you're looking to find out much about the actual men who fought on the side of the Union, which I was; probably ten times as much ink was spent extolling the virtues of the Rebel soldiers. Maybe six or seven Yankees are named beyond mentioning that a private so-and-so died. I could be exaggerating, but not by much. Aside from that, gosh darn, it was poorly written. Or poorly edited. Or both. Literally on consecutive lines of text a man's name might get spelled two or three different ways. In places Pittman either goes from 1861 to 1862 and back three or four times in a paragraph, or gross typographical errors abound. This type of stuff is rampant, such that I was forced to question the accuracy of almost everything this book put forth. There are just too many mixups for me to trust it/him. And don't even get me started on the author's brief yet extravagant biography. Six undergraduate/graduate degrees (from hard science to liberal arts) while serving in three of the armed services and then becoming a professor? It could be true; but I'd expect a guy with that much schooling to be better with dates, names, locations, etc. Honestly, this seemed almost like a vanity publication. Sorry, Mr. Pittman. I have to call it like I see it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Debra

    THE AUTHOR'S USE OVER AND OVER OF THE TERM "HISPANOS" BUGGED ME. I GUESS THAT IS TRITE, BUT IT DID. THE AUTHOR'S USE OVER AND OVER OF THE TERM "HISPANOS" BUGGED ME. I GUESS THAT IS TRITE, BUT IT DID.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bud

  5. 4 out of 5

    Terry Jones

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jami Hart

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mrs. Donald Kinn

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bruce L.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bob

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  11. 5 out of 5

    Beatrix Apodaca

  12. 4 out of 5

    Liz Losole

  13. 5 out of 5

    Puffsrgone

  14. 4 out of 5

    Adam Dean

  15. 4 out of 5

    Wayne Taylor

  16. 5 out of 5

    Corey

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ronda Southworth

  18. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Maher

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mike Emett

  20. 4 out of 5

    Terrance Yount

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Bohnhoff

  22. 5 out of 5

    John

  23. 4 out of 5

    Terry Wolff

  24. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

  25. 4 out of 5

    David

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Norton johnson

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dana

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  30. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  31. 4 out of 5

    Terry

  32. 4 out of 5

    toomanybooks

  33. 4 out of 5

    Valeria Schedar

  34. 4 out of 5

    Yinzadi

  35. 5 out of 5

    Avis Black

  36. 4 out of 5

    LeeAnne

  37. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Pridham

  38. 5 out of 5

    Ubiel Valencia

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