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The Art of the Pitch: Persuasion and Presentation Skills that Win Business

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Occasionally, a great idea will sell itself. The other 99% of the time, you have to find a way to persuade others that it is, in fact, a great idea. Most executives spend the vast majority of their time creating their work, and almost no time on the presentation. Through an engaging and humorous narrative, Peter Coughter presents the tools he designed to help advertising a Occasionally, a great idea will sell itself. The other 99% of the time, you have to find a way to persuade others that it is, in fact, a great idea. Most executives spend the vast majority of their time creating their work, and almost no time on the presentation. Through an engaging and humorous narrative, Peter Coughter presents the tools he designed to help advertising and marketing professionals develop persuasive presentations that deliver business. Readers will learn how to hone their individual natural presentation style, how to organize a powerful presentation, how to harness the elegant power of simplicity, how to truly connect with an audience, how to rehearse effectively, and most importantly, how to win.


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Occasionally, a great idea will sell itself. The other 99% of the time, you have to find a way to persuade others that it is, in fact, a great idea. Most executives spend the vast majority of their time creating their work, and almost no time on the presentation. Through an engaging and humorous narrative, Peter Coughter presents the tools he designed to help advertising a Occasionally, a great idea will sell itself. The other 99% of the time, you have to find a way to persuade others that it is, in fact, a great idea. Most executives spend the vast majority of their time creating their work, and almost no time on the presentation. Through an engaging and humorous narrative, Peter Coughter presents the tools he designed to help advertising and marketing professionals develop persuasive presentations that deliver business. Readers will learn how to hone their individual natural presentation style, how to organize a powerful presentation, how to harness the elegant power of simplicity, how to truly connect with an audience, how to rehearse effectively, and most importantly, how to win.

30 review for The Art of the Pitch: Persuasion and Presentation Skills that Win Business

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Every interaction is business life is a sales pitch, and the product of the sale is you. You, and your ability to be trusted, and the credibility you bring to your work. Quiet and reserved people often resent the need to sell themselves and think the quality of their ideas should be the measure, not how they are packaged. But the reality is, in our information overloaded world, the best ideas will never be heard if they are not presented in a compelling way. It's no secret that the best communic Every interaction is business life is a sales pitch, and the product of the sale is you. You, and your ability to be trusted, and the credibility you bring to your work. Quiet and reserved people often resent the need to sell themselves and think the quality of their ideas should be the measure, not how they are packaged. But the reality is, in our information overloaded world, the best ideas will never be heard if they are not presented in a compelling way. It's no secret that the best communicators earn the most power and influence, even if their ideas are second rate (erm..Donald Trump?). This book breaks down the art form of pitching and in my opinion does it rather well.

  2. 5 out of 5

    DJ

    I had to read this for a class and the writer's arrogance was a huge turn-off. There were some helpful tips, but it was mostly basic information with a lot of bragging. Additionally, there was a LOT of contradictions in the advice as well as occasional misogyny. Would not recommend. I had to read this for a class and the writer's arrogance was a huge turn-off. There were some helpful tips, but it was mostly basic information with a lot of bragging. Additionally, there was a LOT of contradictions in the advice as well as occasional misogyny. Would not recommend.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Dempsey

    In the high-intensity world of business, it is important for firms to do whatever they can to stay ahead. In order to sell a product, service, or idea, the audience must first be convinced. This is exactly the topic of discussion in Peter Coughter’s book, The Art of the Pitch: Persuasion and Presentation Skills that Win Business. Coughter begins by explaining his credibility in the book’s introduction; he was a part of Siddal, Matus & Coughter Ad Agency, a company that started with three inexpe In the high-intensity world of business, it is important for firms to do whatever they can to stay ahead. In order to sell a product, service, or idea, the audience must first be convinced. This is exactly the topic of discussion in Peter Coughter’s book, The Art of the Pitch: Persuasion and Presentation Skills that Win Business. Coughter begins by explaining his credibility in the book’s introduction; he was a part of Siddal, Matus & Coughter Ad Agency, a company that started with three inexperienced men and eventually became very successful. Additionally, he is currently a professor at Virginia Commonwealth University at the VCU Brandcenter graduate program. Coughter’s objective for this book is essentially to teach presentation skills to anyone who has an idea they want to share. Throughout the entire book, a combined argument is seen to involve two broad lessons: be true and be prepared. Of course, in the book, these arguments are further explained. Through the use of specific examples teaching the audience to be true and be prepared, Coughter is able to achieve his main goal: informing others on how to successfully present and persuade in a business setting. The first broad lesson that Coughter explains is to be true. His specific words aren’t “be true,” however many of his lessons fall under the realm of staying true to oneself. According to Coughter, “true human connection is a bond that is based upon emotion. In order to create this, we must be honest, open, and sincere” (p. 69). Therefore, a very important lesson that Coughter teaches is to be oneself and convey emotion. For example, he writes that in his pitch attempt for the State of Virginia Department of Tourism account, he talked about how he felt rather than what he thought. “We put together a presentation that was simple, visually arresting, and overwhelmingly emotional,” he said, “I knew we had won. And we had. They hired us because of the way we felt about the Commonwealth of Virginia” (p. 73). Because he was able to connect with his audience on an emotional level, he set himself apart from all other ad agencies. Clearly, sellers want to sell to whoever can show that they deserve it the most. Next, also falling under the “stay true” category is the idea that you should always try to be yourself. As Coughter puts it, “no one is as good at being you as you” (p. 87). He tells his readers that everyone has something in them that makes them stand out amongst the crowd. The important thing is to find whatever that is and use it to your advantage when speaking in a presentation. To support this idea, Coughter provides an example: “Would we find it entertaining if every professional singer tried to sing exactly like Frank Sinatra? I don’t think so. We like variety. We like differences. Some of us even like quirkiness. We would grow very tired of listening to one singer after another doing Ol’ Blue Eyes” (p. 86). I think that this is a very intelligent comparison. People get bored with monotony, so it makes sense that people who stand out in presentations often do well. The explanation for this argument is very persuasive because of how logical it is; Coughter used simple common sense (the fact that nobody would like every singer to be the same) to support his idea. Additionally, another truthfulness lesson that Coughter teaches is to stay different. This plays along with the idea of being yourself while taking it a step further and calling to embrace it. According to Coughter, “the difference manifests itself in being perceived as smarter, more creative, funnier, stronger, brighter, cooler, better than other people or organizations” (p. 228). Essentially, if you don’t embrace your differences, you will get stuck in the crowd of people who are also unwilling to maximize their full potential. The evidence that Coughter uses to support this claim (his own words) seems truthful, however it could be more effective. Perhaps he could have included a quote from an outside source on how it is vital to stand out in the work force. Of course, this idea is valid, however the supporting evidence is somewhat lacking. This idea of differences strongly relates to the last sentence of the book, “they’re not afraid to stand up” (p. 229). Coughter implements a strong persuasion tactic by ending the book this way. It serves as a call-to-action to anyone reading. While being true to one’s self and values is clearly important when presenting and persuading, it is not the only thing. The other important argument that Coughter makes in his book is that in order to be successful, one must be prepared. The very first chapter of the book is titled “Everything is a Presentation.” In this chapter, Coughter explains that any little insignificant “chat” with a boss counts as a presentation. In every case, people are there to judge. For this reason, one should always prepare to deal with whatever comes their way. To add some credibility to his claim, Coughter includes a quote by John Adams, CEO of The Martin Agency, where he says, “I think the single most important skill anyone can have at this agency is the ability to present” (p. 13). This supporting evidence is very useful and persuasive in Coughter’s favor; he provided supporting insight from a respected outside source, making his claim much more trustworthy. Adding on to this “everything is a presentation” idea, Coughter also says that “you never know when there is someone in the room who can really help/hurt you. You never know when something you have said or done in the past will come back to reward/haunt you. You cannot take any situation for granted. You’ve got to be at your very best at all times” (p. 213). The serious tone of this explanation makes it very persuasive; it gives the readers a sense of urgency. Another important factor of preparedness is having an adequate presentation ready. In many cases, this includes a PowerPoint. While PowerPoint can serve as a very effective tool in presenting, according to Coughter, many people feel inclined to fill each slide entirely with pictures and text. However, Coughter suggests that as a presenter one should “decide what is truly important about the material you’ve assembled and include only that” (p. 139). To support this claim, he provides a before-and-after section in which “good” and “bad” PowerPoint slides are displayed. However, although he is saying that one slide is better than the other, besides his own words, there really isn’t a ton of backing from other sources. Of course, Coughter is a reputable source himself, but in order to make his argument as effective as it can be, he should include the input of other sources on this matter. To conclude, in The Art of the Pitch, Peter Coughter strives to provide information and advice for those who seek to improve their presentation and persuasion skills and clearly, that is what he does. His writing teaches readers to be true to themselves when presenting, by being honest and making emotional connections. Additionally, he teaches readers to always be prepared, for every moment is a potential presentation. Coughter’s biggest strength in this book is his background knowledge on the subject. He has many years of experience with these issues and is a highly credible source of information. However, his one weakness in this writing is an occasional lack of explicit evidence. For example, he makes very good points, yet sometimes he lacks evidence from outside sources that could have otherwise made his work even more solid. I still believe that the information he gives is factual to his knowledge, but perhaps some more statistics or sources could have helped overall validity. In the end, I found the book very engaging and enjoyed it thoroughly. Coughter is very persuasive in his writing style and definitely got his point across to me. I would undoubtedly recommend this book to anyone who is interested in learning about business, as that is his target audience. All in all, Peter Coughter’s The Art of the Pitch is an excellent source of inside knowledge on how presentations really work and a great book for anyone who wants to improve their persuasion skills.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    This was a great book for anyone who needs to get better at presenting, in any industry, but especially the advertising industry. I recommended it last night to a young tech CEO friend of mine. The one thing is I wish it talked more about leave behinds vs. presentations, and presentations that go up onto the web later, like on Slideshare. Peter once saw me present, and told me I had too many words on my slides, AND HE WAS TOTALLY RIGHT, but I had to put all those words on there so the deck made This was a great book for anyone who needs to get better at presenting, in any industry, but especially the advertising industry. I recommended it last night to a young tech CEO friend of mine. The one thing is I wish it talked more about leave behinds vs. presentations, and presentations that go up onto the web later, like on Slideshare. Peter once saw me present, and told me I had too many words on my slides, AND HE WAS TOTALLY RIGHT, but I had to put all those words on there so the deck made sense up on the internet. I'd love to see a companion volume just about that - leave behinds and capturing your presentation for the decision makers who weren't in the room. But other than that, this book is invaluable, and if you don't knock it out of the park every time, or if you're terrified of presenting, read this!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tahira Mursleen

    Honestly, I found this book talking about the same concepts that have been chanted to me as I grew up.However, the reason why I found this book so interesting was the fact that it taught me these same concepts in a way that made me listen. The book was repetitive, but I was engulfed by the way the author wrote his opinion and by his real world examples. It accomplished something I didn't realize until I got to the end. The book was able to pitch me the same concept, in its own way. It was differ Honestly, I found this book talking about the same concepts that have been chanted to me as I grew up.However, the reason why I found this book so interesting was the fact that it taught me these same concepts in a way that made me listen. The book was repetitive, but I was engulfed by the way the author wrote his opinion and by his real world examples. It accomplished something I didn't realize until I got to the end. The book was able to pitch me the same concept, in its own way. It was different, refreshing and I loved it. I learned that sometimes, Its not the content but the person that makes it interesting. This is something I was taught for years, but this book is the proof that showed me without actually saying it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rafsan Ahmed

    The Art of the Pitch was a delight to read. It makes a very clear, precise point, with some fantastic real-life examples. My opinion is of-course biased, as I am naturally drawn to the world of advertising. It sometimes makes the point in a repetitive fashion, but this is partly attributed to the fact that the art of the pitch is something that needs to be practiced. See this merely as a tool to perfect the art, rather than expecting to be great at advertising by reading this book alone. My favori The Art of the Pitch was a delight to read. It makes a very clear, precise point, with some fantastic real-life examples. My opinion is of-course biased, as I am naturally drawn to the world of advertising. It sometimes makes the point in a repetitive fashion, but this is partly attributed to the fact that the art of the pitch is something that needs to be practiced. See this merely as a tool to perfect the art, rather than expecting to be great at advertising by reading this book alone. My favorite parts were the accounts of the Mercedes-Benz pitch, and the Sega pitch. I would recommend this book to any advertising enthusiasts.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Yulenka

    Great book, really interesting insights. I did find it repetitive, to the point where I felt like I had previously read entire sentences. But aside from that, it offered some good advice which really applies to advertising and presenting in general.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Juliana

    The book “The Art of the Pitch: Persuasion and Presentation Skills that Win Business” written by Peter Coughter was a book written from a marketing executive perspective focusing on its main point that a good product is not enough to win. Once reading the book, it is clear Coughter’s audience are presenters. While the book offers advice for marketing in general, the tips he provides are aimed at the presentation side of marketing more so than the analytical and statistical side. The biggest tak The book “The Art of the Pitch: Persuasion and Presentation Skills that Win Business” written by Peter Coughter was a book written from a marketing executive perspective focusing on its main point that a good product is not enough to win. Once reading the book, it is clear Coughter’s audience are presenters. While the book offers advice for marketing in general, the tips he provides are aimed at the presentation side of marketing more so than the analytical and statistical side. The biggest take away from the book, for me, was that your “presentation” isn’t even a presentation; it’s a conversation. I found this interesting because for most of my life, I had been taught to keep things professional and to put your best foot forward. And while it is certainly true that you need to be at the top of your game, Coughter stresses how important it is to be yourself and not to be afraid to get a little personal. To be able to present in a fashion that is smooth and casual, it is crucial to truly know and understand what you are presenting. Though it can be intimidating, “the surest defense against nerves is this- know your stuff” (Coughter 90). Memorizing facts about what you are selling and actually knowing the product/ service and being able to answer questions and bail out teammates is crucial to a presentation. Not only should you know about the product/ service you are pitching, you should know who your audience. Know more than the menial things about who they are, know enough so that you can connect with them on a personal and emotional level. A product can be amazing, but if the pitch is boring, strictly fact based, and unemotional the product may not necessarily sell. Drawing from the idea that this is a conversation where the presenter is doing most of the talking, what makes a conversation interesting? Personal stories, making it clear that you understand your audience, and authenticity. No one wants to be in a long, boring conversation with information that goes in one ear and out the other; the same goes for the presentation. Although not necessarily a formal presentation, I often find the manager at my job employing these same tactics to sell his food. He not only makes sure that the customers are happy with their food, he makes a personal connection with them. I have noticed he will pull up a chair or kneel next to them so that he is on the same level as them to make the conversation even more personal. By doing this and creating a bond with his customers, he is able to get them to try new food, buy more, keep them coming back etc. I liked how Coughter not only offered tips for how to liven up presentations and make it easier for presenters to sell their project, he gave real world examples. For instance, he wrote in stories from presentations of a Mercedes- Benz pitch. Including stories from ad executives who explained why their presentations worked and didn’t work put more context to the information Coughter was giving to us. Coughter included tips that seem obvious like always rehearse, be on time, be on the same page as your teammates, etc. but overall, the book did a fantastic job in teaching not only marketing executives how to give a presentation, but anyone who needs to learn how to give a better presentation. As for downfalls, the book can be repetitive as it based around the notion that it all leads back to a conversation and characteristics of a conversation should be seen in your presentation. However, the repetition makes sense and I would argue, necessary, to get the point across. I attended a series of lectures by Sean O’Grady about how to communicate better with an audience and I found that a lot of what he told us was synonymous with what Coughter wrote. Both gave advice and explained the logic behind why their tips worked. I never once questioned the validity of what either of them was saying because they made it clear what their advice was and why they were giving it. Overall, I would definitely rate this book a five out of five! Coughter is able to inform the reader on how to give a better presentation while keeping the reader intrigued. (side note: imagine that? A book about how to keep presentations interesting ACTUALLY being interesting). It was a quick, enjoyable read that provided a lot of helpful tips that can be applied not just in marketing. I would recommend this book to anyone looking to improve their presentation skills.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Seng Wee Wong

    Not very impressed with the book. The book is written in a colloquial manner and is full of fillers. First of all presentation skills are not easily attainable through a list of pointers. You don't read a book on presentation to improve your presentation skills. It takes years of practice to find your own style of presentation. There are many anecdotes in the book but they are in italics. WHY. (You make the text harder to read) Many pointers mentioned in the book are generic. I strongly suspect Not very impressed with the book. The book is written in a colloquial manner and is full of fillers. First of all presentation skills are not easily attainable through a list of pointers. You don't read a book on presentation to improve your presentation skills. It takes years of practice to find your own style of presentation. There are many anecdotes in the book but they are in italics. WHY. (You make the text harder to read) Many pointers mentioned in the book are generic. I strongly suspect the usefulness of this book. I wouldn't even read the book if it weren't a free book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Richard Mulholland

    As run of the mill presentation books go, this one was fine. It has the usual trope of "tell a story", "body language " type stuff that you find everywhere with little more. Bonus points if you're in advertising as it's about that field. It did frustrated me that it propagated erros like the Mehrabian myth and had a terrible line about not reading your slides. My biggest gripe is that it didn't add anything new. Again not bad, just not memorable. As run of the mill presentation books go, this one was fine. It has the usual trope of "tell a story", "body language " type stuff that you find everywhere with little more. Bonus points if you're in advertising as it's about that field. It did frustrated me that it propagated erros like the Mehrabian myth and had a terrible line about not reading your slides. My biggest gripe is that it didn't add anything new. Again not bad, just not memorable.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mike Bell

    This book combines the thinking of many great books on presenting, but adds inspiration and insights on how to be better in many ways. Great stories from respected people highlight salient points that remind us of the purpose of presenting. 10/10 would recommend.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tyler

    Smart stories and approaches from one of the best new business leaders in advertising. A must read if you are in pitches.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Andrei

    Down-to-earth. Loved it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Kutzin

    Author made some really interesting points about presenting that I never considered. It really does come up in all facets of life. Really easy and chill read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Starks-Dean

    Should be mandatory reading before anyone opens keynote or powerpoint.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Camper

    More about pitching to win business but tons of great info on giving presentations in general.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Manu

    Just few words would be more than enough describe this book from beginning to end - "passion for presenting". This book is loaded with passion that Peter has for delivering amazing presentations. Being a great presenter and having a successful track record of been associated with the world of advertising, Peter has very carefully chosen words to craft this book. Every chapter has details about the lessons he follows when it comes to presentations with tons of examples/stories from some great pre Just few words would be more than enough describe this book from beginning to end - "passion for presenting". This book is loaded with passion that Peter has for delivering amazing presentations. Being a great presenter and having a successful track record of been associated with the world of advertising, Peter has very carefully chosen words to craft this book. Every chapter has details about the lessons he follows when it comes to presentations with tons of examples/stories from some great presenters of our times to prove his point. Since Peter is now a coach as well where he is engaged in helping students learn the art of presentation, this book also reflects his side as a coach. He has talked about so many common mistakes that a common presenter would do and how that presenter can make the use of this book to hone her presentation skills. A must read for someone who has to regularly present to in front of others whether clients or team members or senior leaders. Though this book is a very easy read (what else you can expect from a great presenter), it should be referred time & again till one is able to fully remember and implement the tips in her next presentation.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Troy

    Every successful business man or woman has had to learn the fundamental concepts of 'The Art of the Pitch' in someway or another in their career. Whether it's pitching your employees on a new concept or process, persuading a client to 'go big' and give you their entire budget, convincing friends and family to go on a trip, or even debating with co-workers or loved ones in the realm of life, love, sport or business. Truly grasping the understanding of how to deliver a rock solid pitch can make th Every successful business man or woman has had to learn the fundamental concepts of 'The Art of the Pitch' in someway or another in their career. Whether it's pitching your employees on a new concept or process, persuading a client to 'go big' and give you their entire budget, convincing friends and family to go on a trip, or even debating with co-workers or loved ones in the realm of life, love, sport or business. Truly grasping the understanding of how to deliver a rock solid pitch can make the attainment of all your aspirations, goals and dreams one step closer for anyone. Peter Coughter's candid real life reflections allow you to see the world through the eyes of an advertising genius. He is story teller, one highly important and effective trait of all the worlds top business minds. Try being relatable and vulnerable with your own life lessons and stories in your next pitch and see how effective you can become! -TK

  19. 5 out of 5

    Robbie Zettler

    Focuses on the way to improve the pitch and to persuade others into buying into your idea. Not necessarily tangible ideas, but overarching themes to be followed in order to engage the audience into full participation. Simple concepts from telling stories and "read"punctuation" (aka take a beat every once in awhile), to more difficult ways to engage the room via authenticity and being yourself. There is no reason to attempt to emulate someone else or be "professional" because that is not what is Focuses on the way to improve the pitch and to persuade others into buying into your idea. Not necessarily tangible ideas, but overarching themes to be followed in order to engage the audience into full participation. Simple concepts from telling stories and "read"punctuation" (aka take a beat every once in awhile), to more difficult ways to engage the room via authenticity and being yourself. There is no reason to attempt to emulate someone else or be "professional" because that is not what is going to make the presentation stick. What makes the pitch memorable is the continuous show of passion and true release of who you are.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ben Pinson

    Copied from my Amazon review: This book is fantastic! I've been in sales over 20 years and read a lot of "sales" books during that time. Coughter offers a fresh approach to presenting: yourself, your ideas, your pitch. I found the book to be relevant, and learned some new things I can put into action immediately. If you have ever done a Power Point presentation, or suffered thru one, you should pick this book up. Aside from my interest in the theme, the flow of the book was particularly easy to r Copied from my Amazon review: This book is fantastic! I've been in sales over 20 years and read a lot of "sales" books during that time. Coughter offers a fresh approach to presenting: yourself, your ideas, your pitch. I found the book to be relevant, and learned some new things I can put into action immediately. If you have ever done a Power Point presentation, or suffered thru one, you should pick this book up. Aside from my interest in the theme, the flow of the book was particularly easy to read. Does the very title of the book cause him to pay close attention to this as he is writing it? Perhaps.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dave Perks

    If a good bit of your livelihood involves pitching ideas, making presentations or selling anything, you need this book. Peter Coughter is as good as they come whether he's in front of a room working to win new business or with a small group teaching them how to do it. Secretly I hope that no one else reads this book once I'm done with it because I've got a lot more new business to go out and win as we build this young agency I'm working for. It's a quick read and some of the stories are just fant If a good bit of your livelihood involves pitching ideas, making presentations or selling anything, you need this book. Peter Coughter is as good as they come whether he's in front of a room working to win new business or with a small group teaching them how to do it. Secretly I hope that no one else reads this book once I'm done with it because I've got a lot more new business to go out and win as we build this young agency I'm working for. It's a quick read and some of the stories are just fantastic.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    Much like the author himself, the Art of the Pitch is an expert and amicable authority on how to be winningly memorable. Even if your professional life doesn't involve actually standing up in front of a group of people, you sell yourself everyday. And whether you're selling widgets or quarterly numbers or why you deserve a raise, Peter's book offers guidance and anecdotes that can help even the most timid glossophobe improve his presentation skills. Much like the author himself, the Art of the Pitch is an expert and amicable authority on how to be winningly memorable. Even if your professional life doesn't involve actually standing up in front of a group of people, you sell yourself everyday. And whether you're selling widgets or quarterly numbers or why you deserve a raise, Peter's book offers guidance and anecdotes that can help even the most timid glossophobe improve his presentation skills.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Written with personality and filled with good advice on presentations, meetings, persuasive speaking, and selling your ideas. Peppered with great anecdotes from many of the leading lights of the advertising world, telling their tales of epic wins and occasional defeats. Like most business books I've read, it gets repetitive and could have been shorter. However, I've seen much worse, and this was not a bad read. Written with personality and filled with good advice on presentations, meetings, persuasive speaking, and selling your ideas. Peppered with great anecdotes from many of the leading lights of the advertising world, telling their tales of epic wins and occasional defeats. Like most business books I've read, it gets repetitive and could have been shorter. However, I've seen much worse, and this was not a bad read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    강민 이

    I chose to read this book before I took a course, being one of the recommended books from the professor. It just opened my eyes to new methods of presentation. I always felt that there would be some book out there to teach me the art or presentation and this book is the best I know till now. If there are any recommendations let me know!!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sergio GRANDE

    In a world overflowing with self-help, how-to, DIY and "insightful" lightbulb books, this is a supernova. Forget trite Ogilvy and Hegarty scribbles. This is the real deal. Thank you Mr. Coughter for sharing so much knowledge. PS: If you work in advertising and haven't read this book, GREAT! Don't read it. We don't need any more effective competition. In a world overflowing with self-help, how-to, DIY and "insightful" lightbulb books, this is a supernova. Forget trite Ogilvy and Hegarty scribbles. This is the real deal. Thank you Mr. Coughter for sharing so much knowledge. PS: If you work in advertising and haven't read this book, GREAT! Don't read it. We don't need any more effective competition.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    The bible of public speaking. Essential reading for anyone who wants to sell ideas, tell stories, win arguments, sound like an expert, etc. And when you're the one in the audience, you'll never be able to watch a presentation/pitch/speech the same way again without referencing this book. The bible of public speaking. Essential reading for anyone who wants to sell ideas, tell stories, win arguments, sound like an expert, etc. And when you're the one in the audience, you'll never be able to watch a presentation/pitch/speech the same way again without referencing this book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alan Kercinik

    Whether you are forced to use PowerPoint or Keynote or some other bit of theatre in your day to day life or not, this is worth a read. Because what Coughter is talking about is how to present yourself and how to be in the world. The best business book I've read this year. Whether you are forced to use PowerPoint or Keynote or some other bit of theatre in your day to day life or not, this is worth a read. Because what Coughter is talking about is how to present yourself and how to be in the world. The best business book I've read this year.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Adrian Vaco

    I liked the book overall, but I will say that between 60 and 70% of the material is what you have learned in your college speech class. There is a 20 to 30% material that is really good advice and then there are the stories of the great pitches that make the whole book worth your while.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    A simple, straightforward discussion of the tried-aand-true basics of presentations. There's nothing wrong here to get you started giving good presentations. There's also nothing new. Not for advanced speakers. A simple, straightforward discussion of the tried-aand-true basics of presentations. There's nothing wrong here to get you started giving good presentations. There's also nothing new. Not for advanced speakers.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Laughlin

    This book was amazing for anyone who wants to be reminded/needs help improving their presentations. If the advice followed from this book is used more business will be won. This is a must own for all in the Advertising industry

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