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For a full hour, he poured lemonade. The world is a thirsty place, he thought as he nearly emptied his fourth pitcher of the day. And I am the Lemonade King. Fourth-grader Evan Treski is people-smart. He’s good at talking with people, even grownups. His younger sister, Jessie, on the other hand, is math-smart, but not especially good with people. So when the siblings’ lemon For a full hour, he poured lemonade. The world is a thirsty place, he thought as he nearly emptied his fourth pitcher of the day. And I am the Lemonade King. Fourth-grader Evan Treski is people-smart. He’s good at talking with people, even grownups. His younger sister, Jessie, on the other hand, is math-smart, but not especially good with people. So when the siblings’ lemonade stand war begins, there really is no telling who will win—or even if their fight will ever end. Brimming with savvy marketing tips for making money at any business, definitions of business terms, charts, diagrams, and even math problems, this fresh, funny, emotionally charged novel subtly explores how arguments can escalate beyond anyone’s intent. Awards: 2009 Rhode Island Children's Book Award, 2007 New York Public Library 100 Titles for Reading and Sharing, North Carolina Children’s Book Award 2011, 2011 Nutmeg Award (Connecticut) Check out www.lemonadewar.com for more information on The Lemonade War Series, including sequels The Lemonade Crime, The Bell Bandit, and The Candy Smash.


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For a full hour, he poured lemonade. The world is a thirsty place, he thought as he nearly emptied his fourth pitcher of the day. And I am the Lemonade King. Fourth-grader Evan Treski is people-smart. He’s good at talking with people, even grownups. His younger sister, Jessie, on the other hand, is math-smart, but not especially good with people. So when the siblings’ lemon For a full hour, he poured lemonade. The world is a thirsty place, he thought as he nearly emptied his fourth pitcher of the day. And I am the Lemonade King. Fourth-grader Evan Treski is people-smart. He’s good at talking with people, even grownups. His younger sister, Jessie, on the other hand, is math-smart, but not especially good with people. So when the siblings’ lemonade stand war begins, there really is no telling who will win—or even if their fight will ever end. Brimming with savvy marketing tips for making money at any business, definitions of business terms, charts, diagrams, and even math problems, this fresh, funny, emotionally charged novel subtly explores how arguments can escalate beyond anyone’s intent. Awards: 2009 Rhode Island Children's Book Award, 2007 New York Public Library 100 Titles for Reading and Sharing, North Carolina Children’s Book Award 2011, 2011 Nutmeg Award (Connecticut) Check out www.lemonadewar.com for more information on The Lemonade War Series, including sequels The Lemonade Crime, The Bell Bandit, and The Candy Smash.

30 review for The Lemonade War

  1. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    This was on my Overdrive wishlist and I have no idea why. I listened to it this week because I'm waiting for a long audiobook to come in so I can't start a full-on story right now. I prefer listening to stories over music when I'm doing my job (less of a chance I'll burst into song in the middle of a quiet room. Also, cuts down on chair dancing which, from what I hear, isn't a safe workplace activity) so I've decided the solution to my waiting period is to listen to middle grade books. They rarel This was on my Overdrive wishlist and I have no idea why. I listened to it this week because I'm waiting for a long audiobook to come in so I can't start a full-on story right now. I prefer listening to stories over music when I'm doing my job (less of a chance I'll burst into song in the middle of a quiet room. Also, cuts down on chair dancing which, from what I hear, isn't a safe workplace activity) so I've decided the solution to my waiting period is to listen to middle grade books. They rarely take longer than 2 days to complete and I get to partake in reading at a level I don't usually read. It's win/win and I'll still be able to start my long audiobook pretty much as soon as it comes in. This book is 10 years old this year. Except for Evan's iPod desire, it holds up really well. I'm not sure why it took me a decade to get to this, it's a phenomenal story. It covers all kinds of territory, from sibling rivalry to struggles in relating with other humans to math to business enterprises to community to friendship to family and it all goes together seamlessly, not making a big to-do out of any one issue. Added bonus: not everyone is given physical characteristics and even with assumptions regarding surnames, most of the characters in this book could be represented by anyone. There aren't even any people parts on the cover so a reader isn't biased as to who these people may be. Quick summary: Evan is bitter that his 2nd-grade sister, Jessie, will be skipping 3rd grade to join him in 4th grade after summer break. Evan's an incredible big brother and has tailored a lot of his time and communication to his younger sister who has difficulties understanding people, emotions, and the nuances of human interaction. She relies on him to help her navigate the world around her but the thing is, Evan needs his own space, too, and now the one space he has is going to include his charming, brilliant, but needy sister. A fight ensues and it leads to a war of lemonade stands in which the sibling who has earned the most money by the end of summer (5 days away) wins and gets the other sibling's earnings, as well. You know this isn't going to end with one kid winning and the other losing. You also know they're going to have to work out their issues. That's just how these stories go. But the in-between, the path through lemonade stands to reconciliation, it's beautiful. The sibling anger herein is tangible and realistic. We've got Evan. He's caring and loving but has also had it with being the stellar big brother and when he finds out that his smarter-than-him sister will be joining him in class in the coming school year, his good sense and patience fly out the window and he freaks out, taking everything out on his sister. Then we've got Jessie who is logical, a math genius and who also excels at being patient when explaining to others things that come so naturally to her. However, she can't understand in reverse; she takes words at face value, doesn't get when kids are being subtly mean to her, and can't seem to make any friends. She's so frustrated with her normally understandable and understanding brother's cold behavior. I am the oldest sibling and I was the smartest, school-wise, so this particular dynamic didn't happen to me. However, I did feel the sting of carting around younger siblings when I wanted to play with my friends, of sharing resources, and of petty jealousies so I got what was going on between these two. I think this story could be a source of comfort to a lot of frustrated siblings, both older and younger. I loved how each kid's talents were showcased. Evan's not as sympathetic because he knows better but, at the same time, he's reached his limit and that's a relatable situation. Jessie's trying as hard as she can and she's got great ideas and is a whiz at problem solving but she's super needy. The kids don't have to come to the realization that they work better together, though they do work well together. They already know this. Instead, they get to learn more about how they work independently of one another and that's a really important message for kids with close siblings; it's hard to figure out who you are without relation to who your sisters/brothers are. I hope kids who read this feel more and more uncomfortable as Evan and Jessie become vicious toward one another. It's great to see how far kids can be pushed when they're set on winning and how vindictive they can become in the name of being right. I think adults often miss that in-between, wondering why kids sometimes go from being happy-go-lucky straight to crazy but this illustrates that path beautifully and I hope young readers can feel when the line from competition to plain-old wrong is crossed. I had one minor gripe about something not tied up on the end but it looks like that's addressed in the next book so I'm looking even more forward to reading that one...just as soon as I'm done with all my assigned readings. Gabe and I were talking about this one over dinner last night, about how charmed I am with this story. He said it sounded familiar and looked up some information about it. Apparently, this is used in the classroom a lot. I can see why. In addition to the math component - and can I just say I'm with Evan; I was horrible at math, it made no sense. Had I had a book like this, though, I would have been comforted and I think I'd have gained a little confidence in allowing myself to find other ways to puzzle out word problems - the compassion element, the running-a-business theme, and stressing the importance of friends are all useful teaching tools. I highly recommend this book to any reader willing to pick up a middle grade novel.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

    Loved this book! Evan and Jessie Treski will be in the same fourth grade classroom next year, since Jessie will skip one grade. Evan is not really happy with the idea of having his little sister in his same grade, specially because Jessie is the "smart-one" and he's scared to death of being embarrassed by her. Jessie can't understand why Evan is so mad at her. She was feeling so happy she'll be in Evan's class next year since he is the "good-one-understanding-people" and could help her to fit in Loved this book! Evan and Jessie Treski will be in the same fourth grade classroom next year, since Jessie will skip one grade. Evan is not really happy with the idea of having his little sister in his same grade, specially because Jessie is the "smart-one" and he's scared to death of being embarrassed by her. Jessie can't understand why Evan is so mad at her. She was feeling so happy she'll be in Evan's class next year since he is the "good-one-understanding-people" and could help her to fit in the new group. This disagreement between sister and brother will end in The Lemonade War, where the first one earning one hundred dollars selling lemonade in the 5 days before coming back to school wins and keeps all the money. The looser wins nothing. This is a book full of funny situations, feelings fathom and comical introduction of business concepts. It's fresh and enjoyable. The last chapter is as funny as emotional. Absolutely recommended for children in the 8-10 years old range. Check out more children's book reviews in my Reviews in Chalk Blog!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    Evan and his younger sister have a totally different reaction to the news that they will be in the same class next year. Evan is not feeling very good about having his younger sister skipping third grade and being in fourth grade with him next school year. Jesse is excited to be in her big brother's room. She feels he will be her gateway to having friends in her class this year and will ease her into being the new girl in the class. As the summer is closely coming to an end they begin a "friendl Evan and his younger sister have a totally different reaction to the news that they will be in the same class next year. Evan is not feeling very good about having his younger sister skipping third grade and being in fourth grade with him next school year. Jesse is excited to be in her big brother's room. She feels he will be her gateway to having friends in her class this year and will ease her into being the new girl in the class. As the summer is closely coming to an end they begin a "friendly competion" with opening their own Lemonade stands to see who can raise $100.00 first. They both use different approaches to earning their money. Good book to use as a Math lesson as they use Math facts to prove calculations on what they have to do to get to 100. This would be a good book for boys or girls. I would recomend it as a 4th or 5th grade read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    With the start of school just around the corner The Lemonade Wars by Jacqueline Davies is a perfect reading fit. What would you do if you discovered that your little sister was going to skip into your grade at school next year? Not only your grade, but also your exact classroom because there is only one 4th grade in the school? That is the news the letter from school had to share. Jessie is good at school. She is smart. She has great ideas. She loves to get things done and to solve problems. She With the start of school just around the corner The Lemonade Wars by Jacqueline Davies is a perfect reading fit. What would you do if you discovered that your little sister was going to skip into your grade at school next year? Not only your grade, but also your exact classroom because there is only one 4th grade in the school? That is the news the letter from school had to share. Jessie is good at school. She is smart. She has great ideas. She loves to get things done and to solve problems. She does things, but she’s not that good at understanding people. She doesn’t have many friends. Other kids think she’s weird. Evan’s not so great at school. He is athletic and active. He has friends. Will that be the case now… now that everything has changed? That’s the dilemma. Evan and Jessie get along just great at home. They like being together and since their dad has left the family they have made a pact never to fight and argue, especially in front of mom. But now Evan is angry. He doesn’t want to be shown up by his little sister. She’s good at reading. She’s GREAT at math, but she’s awkward. Now everyone he knows will know too and it’s just too much to bear. There’s a heat wave and Evan sets up a lemonade stand (one of Jessie’s favorite things to do) with Scott?!? He purposefully excludes Jessie. She’s hurt. “Good,” thinks Evan. “But Scott,” wonders Jessie. He’s not nice and he’s not really Evan’s great friend. One thing leads to another and before you know it that last dog days of summer have turned into an all out war – winner takes all! When the final summer fireworks explode who will be the winner, Jessie or Evan? Read The Lemonade War to find out. You’ll be glad you did! The story continues in The Lemonade Crime and you can discover more about the family in The Bell Bandit. This is the third of the five books in the series full of great characters, relationships and genuine understanding of how things change no matter how much you wish they would stay the same.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Angel_E1

    I really enjoyed this book because I also have a younger sibling just like Evan. I know exactly why Evan is thinking things that way and if I were him, I think I'd do the exact same thing. This book taught me how to see things in different point of view. Maybe next time when I'm having an argument with my sister or even someone else, I would try to look at things from their point of view. I strongly recommend this book to people who have siblings because they may find this to be cool and interes I really enjoyed this book because I also have a younger sibling just like Evan. I know exactly why Evan is thinking things that way and if I were him, I think I'd do the exact same thing. This book taught me how to see things in different point of view. Maybe next time when I'm having an argument with my sister or even someone else, I would try to look at things from their point of view. I strongly recommend this book to people who have siblings because they may find this to be cool and interesting.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    I selected this as one of six books for student book clubs in my classroom and I'm glad I did! This was such a cute book and an easy read for my students in this group! Evan and his younger sister, Jessie, enter into a lemonade war at the end of the summer. The two spend one final weekend setting up lemonade stands around their neighborhood in order to see who will raise the most money, winner takes all. What follows is a series of ups and downs as brother and sister try to one-up each other in a I selected this as one of six books for student book clubs in my classroom and I'm glad I did! This was such a cute book and an easy read for my students in this group! Evan and his younger sister, Jessie, enter into a lemonade war at the end of the summer. The two spend one final weekend setting up lemonade stands around their neighborhood in order to see who will raise the most money, winner takes all. What follows is a series of ups and downs as brother and sister try to one-up each other in an attempt to show each other who is the best. Great read! I'm excited to work with my students as they read this one!

  7. 4 out of 5

    April

    Derek read this to me and I totally enjoyed it. Take away for us was to recognize that the way we see things might not be the same way someone else does and to appreciate your siblings.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Martha Freeman

    “The Lemonade War” is an excellent back-to-school title that deserves its place on the Amazon bestseller list. Jessie and Evan are sister and brother, only 14 months apart in age and – because Jessie has skipped – both entering fourth grade. Jessie is good at math but not so good at people, and Evan is the opposite. The two are close not only because of their complementary talents but also, the reader infers, because of the tough times they weathered as their parents’ marriage fell apart. Now it “The Lemonade War” is an excellent back-to-school title that deserves its place on the Amazon bestseller list. Jessie and Evan are sister and brother, only 14 months apart in age and – because Jessie has skipped – both entering fourth grade. Jessie is good at math but not so good at people, and Evan is the opposite. The two are close not only because of their complementary talents but also, the reader infers, because of the tough times they weathered as their parents’ marriage fell apart. Now it’s the end of summer, and a heat wave afflicts their Massachusetts neighborhood. Jessie wants to set up a lemonade stand with Evan, but Evan has been acting weird ever since a letter arrived saying the two are going to be in the same class. The book is told first from Evan’s then from Jessie’s point of view, and over time we recognize a time-honored theme, the difficulty of understanding even people we’re close to. Jessie thinks Evan doesn’t want her in his class, and she’s right. But it’s not because she’s embarrassing. It’s because he knows she’s smarter than he is. The result of the bad feelings between them is – you guessed it – a lemonade war. Each sibling allies with a friend to see who can make more money selling lemonade before Labor Day. This is a really clever set-up. The competition keeps the pages turning while the whole lemonade thing gives the author a chance to impart lessons on business, free enterprise and arithmetic. At one point, Jessie and her business partner Megan even take a stab at franchising. Yeah, it’s didactic, which is also the rap from naysaying critics. In this it reminds me of “Frindle” and other popular titles from Andrew Clements. And like Clements, Davies compensates for the moralizing with good storytelling and thought-provoking ideas. The premise -- siblings competing to sell lemonade – is funny, and The Lemonade War has a few laugh-out-loud moments. At the same time, the book has emotional depth. There is at least one really nasty character, a boy who may or may not be a thief. Jessie’s second-grade year was marred when she was victimized by some mean girls in her class. And underlying everything is sadness over the parents’ divorce and the responsibility Jessie and Evan feel for taking care of their mom. I do have some quibbles. At times both children and especially their vocabulary seem much older than any eight- or nine-year-old I ever encountered. For example, Evan says his friend Scott is “bankrolling” their first lemonade stand, and Jessie instructs Megan to “hold down the fort” so she can scout the competition. In this context, Evan’s cluelessness about basic arithmetic seems unlikely. Even with the coins in front of him, he can’t figure out how much money he’s made selling 14 cups of lemonade at 50 cents each. All in all, though, “The Lemonade War” is a well-constructed, fast-paced book with a satisfying ending. And if you want to know what happens next, there are two sequels: “The Lemonade Crime,” in which we learn even more about Evan’s weasel-y friend Scott, and “The Bell Bandit.”

  9. 5 out of 5

    Steven R. McEvoy

    This was the first book by Jacqueline Davies that I have read but it will not be the last! This book was recommended to me based on my love of books by Andrew Clements. This book was a fun read, and deals with a number of interesting topics. And I am sure children will love the sibling rivalries. This book takes place over a summer vacation from school. The two main characters in this book are Evan Treski, Evan is frustrated because his younger sister, Jessie is smarter than him. She is so smart This was the first book by Jacqueline Davies that I have read but it will not be the last! This book was recommended to me based on my love of books by Andrew Clements. This book was a fun read, and deals with a number of interesting topics. And I am sure children will love the sibling rivalries. This book takes place over a summer vacation from school. The two main characters in this book are Evan Treski, Evan is frustrated because his younger sister, Jessie is smarter than him. She is so smart she is skipping a grade and in the fall they will be in the same class. Evan really does not like this and it is eating at him. He does not like it because he already struggles in school, and now his little sister is going to show him up every day in class. Ever is great at people smarts, but Jessie is the brain when it comes to book smarts. But Jessie struggles with interactions with people, especially her peers. But all of this comes to a head when they start the lemonade war. Each out to prove a point. But both unaware of everything the other is feeling. The characters are very well written. It is really fun watching the siblings battle and keep escalating the conflict. And both are making bad choices, even after struggling with the decision. And then each of them learning to live with it. It was also interesting how much business vocabulary is woven into the story with both the words and their meaning. It is also very interesting to watch the different approaches to business and the conflict with each other. This book teaches a lot, but without being preachy. It teaches about business, family relationships, teamwork, relationships and also forgiveness. This book has won a number of awards the 2009 Rhode Island Children's Book Award, 2007 New York Public Library 100 Titles for Reading and Sharing, North Carolina Children’s Book Award 2011, Nutmeg Award 20111. And if the rest of the series is just as good we are in for some more excellent read. This was a very enjoyable read, I look forward to reading it and the rest of the series with my children, as such I think it is a great book for young readers and those who read with or to them. Read the review on my blog Book Reviews and More and soon reviews of other books by Jacqueline Davies.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Kotkin

    This first book in The Lemonade War series portrays the closeness, miscommunication, anger and resentment, and ultimate reconciliation of siblings. The third-person POV alternates between the brother and sister. The author's masterful ability to show, not tell, brings the story to life. Math problems and business principles are woven into the story.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Yas

    the type of books i remember reading in 1st grade-

  12. 5 out of 5

    Katie Fitzgerald

    At the start of this story, Jessie and her older brother Evan learn that, because Jessie has skipped a grade, they will be in the same fourth grade class when school starts in a couple of weeks. Jessie, who has a hard time picking up on social cues, can’t understand why her brother, who is himself self-conscious about his performance as a student, is upset. The pair’s miscommunications grow worse and worse as school gets closer, resulting eventually in a war over whose lemonade stand can raise m At the start of this story, Jessie and her older brother Evan learn that, because Jessie has skipped a grade, they will be in the same fourth grade class when school starts in a couple of weeks. Jessie, who has a hard time picking up on social cues, can’t understand why her brother, who is himself self-conscious about his performance as a student, is upset. The pair’s miscommunications grow worse and worse as school gets closer, resulting eventually in a war over whose lemonade stand can raise more money. Embedded in the plot are definitions of vocabulary words related to business, math problems which are solved to further the success of the lemonade stands, and subtle hints at Jessie and Evan’s dad’s abandonment of the family, which contributes to their overall feelings of frustration. I was really impressed by the level of the writing in this book. Author Jacqueline Davies is a master of showing rather than telling, which makes the lessons her book offers very easy and even enjoyable to swallow. Jessie and Evan clearly have a very close relationship, a concept that can sometimes across as cheesy to kids who fight with their siblings, but Davies handles it in a very straightforward and emotionally honest way, which makes it very plausible and touching. The differences between the two kids are also very carefully and specifically described, and these differences in temperament, personality, and socialization add fuel to the fire of their fight once it begins. Yes, this book does teach the reader about business and math, but it’s also about family relationships, compromise, teamwork, and learning to forgive.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    A colleague I teach with recommended this book to me as a possible classroom read aloud, and I enjoyed it. Jacqueline Davies seems to really understand children well, and her characters react very realistically to events that happen in their lives. The plot revolves around a brother and sister, Jessie and Evan, who care about each other very much, but have very different strengths and weaknesses that are causing conflict for them. Jessie is very strong academically, but doesn't know how to relat A colleague I teach with recommended this book to me as a possible classroom read aloud, and I enjoyed it. Jacqueline Davies seems to really understand children well, and her characters react very realistically to events that happen in their lives. The plot revolves around a brother and sister, Jessie and Evan, who care about each other very much, but have very different strengths and weaknesses that are causing conflict for them. Jessie is very strong academically, but doesn't know how to relate to people very well, and Evan can make friends and relate to people easily, but math is very hard for him. They have bad attitudes at times, call each other names, etc., but the love they have for each other is still there. The story does an excellent job of showing that there can still be a great deal of love present even in the midst of the strongest sibling rivalry, and that it is often very difficult to understand someones emotions, even if you are very close to them. Both children seem to feel they have to shoulder adult worries and responsibilities at times, and it made me want to reassure both of them. Think of how much money these two could have made if they had worked together; their strengths were very complimentary. Ms. Davies is also able to get several economic concepts across in a very fun way. I think my class will enjoy listening to it and discussing it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Smith

    Why do so many people like this book? To me it read like some kind of child labor manual. All the math and business lessons. Also, where was the mother in all this? She seems to pay no attention to the children except when assigning them chores around the house. Not my favorite book. Definitely won't be recommending it. I'm actually kind of shocked by this book's positive reviews!

  15. 5 out of 5

    GalindoLibrarian

    Enjoyed the sibling relationship--the closeness, the anger, the distance, the competition, the misunderstandings...good realistic fiction. And fun to think through their money-making schemes...some good financial literacy embedded in there. :) A fun book that left me wanting to read the sequel!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Hudson .W

    “One thing ends, another thing begins,” said Mrs.Treski. I Like this quote because it explains that something bad might happen but at the end of that something good can happen. People can learn that not everything is bad to end. For example, school summer. “The Lemonade war” by Jacqueline Davies is about a brother and sister fighting to make the most money though lemonade. The book says they start fighting because Evan’s sister Jessie is really smart so she gets moved up into Evans class. Additi “One thing ends, another thing begins,” said Mrs.Treski. I Like this quote because it explains that something bad might happen but at the end of that something good can happen. People can learn that not everything is bad to end. For example, school summer. “The Lemonade war” by Jacqueline Davies is about a brother and sister fighting to make the most money though lemonade. The book says they start fighting because Evan’s sister Jessie is really smart so she gets moved up into Evans class. Additionally, the book explains They split up on sailing lemonade and find different people to do it with, which starts a war to see who can sale the most money. Furthermore, It says They fight and sabotage each other until they count up there money to see who got the most, but the just end up calling it a tie and stop fighting. Overall the theme of this book is that you don’t always have to win. I would recommend this book to ever one.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elena

    Fantastic book!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ellie Grace

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. War !Jessie and Evan sabotage each other more and more. They knock each other down with a money contest. They finally apologized and stopped their fight.

  19. 5 out of 5

    BarbaraW

    Cute little quick read. Middle grades reader or younger. Who cares. Sneaky way to teach kids math! Couldn’t believe a 2nd grader could figure all this out. Times tables when I was coming up weren’t taught til 4 th grade. Yeah she’s skipping a grade! If you’ve ever had a lemonade stand- like I did-it’ll bring back memories both good and bad.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brittney Lara

    I read this entire book in one sitting! I don't often do that anymore since life gets ahead of me but this was a book I shared with my 5th grade sister. We sat side by side all day long reading to one another until we finished. When we got to the end I said GIVE ME MORE! I wanted the next copy. I needed to know what else happens to these characters. I was invested. This book is not only hysterical, it has great life lessons for kids. You can take this book and use it in math. What you can use li I read this entire book in one sitting! I don't often do that anymore since life gets ahead of me but this was a book I shared with my 5th grade sister. We sat side by side all day long reading to one another until we finished. When we got to the end I said GIVE ME MORE! I wanted the next copy. I needed to know what else happens to these characters. I was invested. This book is not only hysterical, it has great life lessons for kids. You can take this book and use it in math. What you can use literature to help you understand basic math computations? YES you can! This book must have been created with math in mind. It blows my mind. You can go step by step into sales, profits, and expenses. The author also included diagrams as well as illustrations to help make those connections. This book is about siblings, Evan and Jessie, whom decide to compete as to which lemonade stand would sell more. Evan is no good at the mathematical component of business but sure knows how to sweet talk his customers. His younger sister however is praised for her math abilities and outshines her brother in this area which makes him envious. This story shows true competition and the hard work it takes to compete with someone else. It also takes you on a journey as a reader as you follow the sibling rivalry. This would be a book I could use to help teach students the literary theme plot because it is a fictional story with lots of problems, conflicts, resolutions, and even has a strong climax! I think students can easily relate to the text and can bring in prior experiences of sales they have done. This story is also great for projects of trying to sell a product in a neighborhood and compete with classmates to see how easily this could be done. As my students start to explore more chapter books, this is such a great read aloud that is so page turning the kids never want you to put it down. It leaves them hungry for more. For me the best part about this book was the ending. I love how the book came full circle and that the characters learned something about each other. I would say you would be crazy not to love this story but I think you would have to read it yourself to find out. I would read this grades 3-5 and incorporate it for a wide range of things to include key details, economics, conflict/resolution, character dynamics, and so much more! Hope this inspires you to read the story.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Maka

    One of the books I read when I was younger, I loved it back then and I still love it now! The characters are very likable and the story is pretty simple but I love simplicity as long as its not boring which this book wasn't.Its been a while since I read a book so simple,interesting, and funny! Totally recommended to people who want a refreshing and relaxing story! Maybe with a glass of lemonade! (Pun intended)

  22. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    I could not put this down. Yes, it's about childish brother-sister angst, but it's not ordinary. And this book includes graphic features and math skills, an opportunity to really push my students, getting them to truly connect their learning.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Leslie Wilkins

    Excellent book for reading out loud to the kids. This clever series introduces industry-related concepts with each chapter. This book focuses on business and marketing. But the story is so well done, readers don't realize they're learning at the same time.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    My fourth grade daughter and I both read The Lemonade War as a mom-daughter book club. Terrific book which brings up topics of discussion relevant to her age. We're excited to read book 2 in the series to discover who is the $$ thief!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I listened to this book on Cd with my girls in the car. We love listening to little bits of books every time we're driving. We loved this one! The math aspect is really cool, too, because there's a lot of math involved in the lemonade business. Great learning opportunities in this one!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Martha

    Now I know why this book is so popular in our library. Readers will learn a crash course on economics and marketing, valuing the types of intelligence that help one succeed, and how to overcome challenges. A wonderful read that is convincing and full of heart!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Knight

    Read this as a school-wide read aloud. Even my first graders could follow along and really loved the characters! They couldn't wait to read the next chapters and figure out when and how Jessie and Evan would make up. Definitely recommend!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kris Patrick

    I don't understand why kids and teachers like this book so much. Third person narrative makes it boring.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Kline

    I think this book was pretty good. It was based off these two siblings that loved to sell lemonade together. Jessie (the main character) and Evan (her older brother) were in the last few days of summer and Jessie was waiting to see if she passed the test that allowed her to skip a grade, she's really smart for her age. These two did mostly everything together besides what they did at school this is why when Evan found out Jessie was able to go up he got kind of mad because she was his little sis I think this book was pretty good. It was based off these two siblings that loved to sell lemonade together. Jessie (the main character) and Evan (her older brother) were in the last few days of summer and Jessie was waiting to see if she passed the test that allowed her to skip a grade, she's really smart for her age. These two did mostly everything together besides what they did at school this is why when Evan found out Jessie was able to go up he got kind of mad because she was his little sister and he didn't want her in the same class as him showing him up and getting all the answers right while he couldn't even get a couple right. So Evan was mad at Jessie and she didn't know why but the reader knows why because it's obvious and you can just use common sense. But while Evan was mad, I don't even know how it happened but they brought up having a "lemonade war" to see who could make $100 in five days. The loser gave all of their earnings to the winner. The first day Evan called 4 of his friends to help him run a lemonade stand, all of the profit they made they all gave their share to Evan right in front of Jessie. She was confused on why they did that and knew that she was going to have to try a lot harder to make money if evan was going to keep doing it this way. Jessie decided to call a girl in Evans grade and asked her if she wanted to do a lemonade stand with her, she said yes. They did this for three days until Jessie thought up a better idea, making a bunch of lemonade stands all around town, Megan (the girl Jessie had called) had a lot friends and Jessie knew this so she asked Megan to call some of them and asked them to make a lemonade stand. Jessie and Megan would provide the lemonade mix and then get half the profit. About 10 people did it and they made about $200 at the end of collecting all the money. Jessie knew Evan didn't make $200 so she went to the beach with megan. Before she went she saw Evan making a big bucket of lemonade which he was going to ride around town and sell but Jessie quickly did the math in her head and all that lemonade would sell for way more money than what Jessie had so she put bugs and dirt in it which was really mean but anyway he had to dump it all out. Evan knew Jessie did this so he found where her money was and took it and lost it on accident. When Jessie got home she was ready to show Evan how much money she made and would win the war but it was nowhere to be found and she was confused so Evan told her. They ended up making up and being friends and nice to each other again and won the science fair together and made $100 dollars. That's it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    David

    My first grader's elementary school selected this book for a "school-wide reading program" where the whole school was to read a chapter a day with their families at home. Just before starting this book, our family was reading the Magic Treehouse series at bedtime which was a fun light-hearted collection of stories about a brother and sister going on adventures together. The Lemonade War, however, went in the opposite direction, pitting a brother and sister against each other in a sort of contest My first grader's elementary school selected this book for a "school-wide reading program" where the whole school was to read a chapter a day with their families at home. Just before starting this book, our family was reading the Magic Treehouse series at bedtime which was a fun light-hearted collection of stories about a brother and sister going on adventures together. The Lemonade War, however, went in the opposite direction, pitting a brother and sister against each other in a sort of contest that erodes their relationship more and more every step of the way. We didn't know what to expect going in, and I have to admit we were caught off guard at first. This book quickly introduces some complex, heavy themes (for a young child) of jealousy, troubled relationships, brother and sister at war, self doubt, hateful comments, theft, a father who left, and an overall harsh negativity carried throughout the entire book. Needless to say, this book was different than our "typical" reading material. While reading, my wife and I would often stop and explain some parts to our kids, or ask them what they thought about what was going on. This in turn prompted some of the best conversations with both our first grader and our preschooler. The first couple of nights resulted in tidal waves of talk about their "feelings" that they were having at school, as they tried to relate to the feelings in the book. From start to finish, they had a blast trying to relate to the characters (which resulted in many hilariously long tangents that lead to some amusing and interesting discussions!). It was so great to hear all this interesting stuff it stirred up inside them, and I always looked forward to hearing what they'd have to say when something especially interesting or heavy happened in the story. It was also fun to hear who they wanted to "win" the war, as they shifted back and forth between Evan and Jessie throughout. It was a great practice in empathy, and demonstrating the impact miscommunication and assumptions could have. The book also manages to introduce a lot of math and business concepts throughout the story, but the drama is really what kept our kids intrigued. Considering the length of the book, I think they would have appreciated at least a few more light-hearted moments interspersed but nope, it was pretty much war from beginning to end. I'm grateful the school selected a book that addressed so many emotions and feelings that clearly were relatable to both of our young kids. I'll always remember a lot of the bedtime discussions that it sparked. We are looking forward to getting back to a "lighter" book again, but I wouldn't be against going back for the next in The Lemonade War series sometime in the future.

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