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During the mid-twentieth century, Latin American countries witnessed unprecedented struggles over the terms of national sovereignty, civic participation, and social justice.  Nowhere was this more visible than in Peronist Argentina (1946–1955), where Juan and Eva Perón led the region’s largest populist movement in pursuit of new political hopes and material desires. Eduard During the mid-twentieth century, Latin American countries witnessed unprecedented struggles over the terms of national sovereignty, civic participation, and social justice.  Nowhere was this more visible than in Peronist Argentina (1946–1955), where Juan and Eva Perón led the region’s largest populist movement in pursuit of new political hopes and material desires. Eduardo Elena considers this transformative moment from a fresh perspective by exploring the intersection of populism and mass consumption. He argues that Peronist actors redefined national citizenship around expansive promises of a vida digna (dignified life), which encompassed not only the satisfaction of basic wants, but also the integration of working Argentines into a modern consumer society. From the mid-1940s onward, the state moved to boost purchasing power and impose discipline on the marketplace, all while broadcasting images of a contented populace.     Drawing on documents such as the correspondence between Peronist sympathizers and authorities, Elena sheds light on the contest over the dignified life. He shows how the consumer aspirations of citizens overlapped with Peronist paradigms of state-led development, but not without generating great friction among allies and opposition from diverse sectors of society.  Consumer practices encouraged intense public scrutiny of class and gender comportment, and everyday objects became freighted with new cultural meaning.  By providing important insights on why Peronism struck such a powerful chord, Dignifying Argentina situates Latin America within the broader history of citizenship and consumption at mid-century, and provides innovative ways to understand the politics of redistribution in the region today.


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During the mid-twentieth century, Latin American countries witnessed unprecedented struggles over the terms of national sovereignty, civic participation, and social justice.  Nowhere was this more visible than in Peronist Argentina (1946–1955), where Juan and Eva Perón led the region’s largest populist movement in pursuit of new political hopes and material desires. Eduard During the mid-twentieth century, Latin American countries witnessed unprecedented struggles over the terms of national sovereignty, civic participation, and social justice.  Nowhere was this more visible than in Peronist Argentina (1946–1955), where Juan and Eva Perón led the region’s largest populist movement in pursuit of new political hopes and material desires. Eduardo Elena considers this transformative moment from a fresh perspective by exploring the intersection of populism and mass consumption. He argues that Peronist actors redefined national citizenship around expansive promises of a vida digna (dignified life), which encompassed not only the satisfaction of basic wants, but also the integration of working Argentines into a modern consumer society. From the mid-1940s onward, the state moved to boost purchasing power and impose discipline on the marketplace, all while broadcasting images of a contented populace.     Drawing on documents such as the correspondence between Peronist sympathizers and authorities, Elena sheds light on the contest over the dignified life. He shows how the consumer aspirations of citizens overlapped with Peronist paradigms of state-led development, but not without generating great friction among allies and opposition from diverse sectors of society.  Consumer practices encouraged intense public scrutiny of class and gender comportment, and everyday objects became freighted with new cultural meaning.  By providing important insights on why Peronism struck such a powerful chord, Dignifying Argentina situates Latin America within the broader history of citizenship and consumption at mid-century, and provides innovative ways to understand the politics of redistribution in the region today.

27 review for Dignifying Argentina: Peronism, Citizenship, and Mass Consumption

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Makes a good point about the rhetoric (and its limitations) of the regime, but I'm curious how it compares to, say, the Vargas dictatorship. This book seems to border on 'Argentine exceptionalism,' if only because it doesn't really engage with outside examples. Even so, it's long enough and complete enough as it is. Makes a good point about the rhetoric (and its limitations) of the regime, but I'm curious how it compares to, say, the Vargas dictatorship. This book seems to border on 'Argentine exceptionalism,' if only because it doesn't really engage with outside examples. Even so, it's long enough and complete enough as it is.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Eli

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ed

  4. 5 out of 5

    Guillermo

  5. 5 out of 5

    A Girl Named Ed

  6. 5 out of 5

    Benbryce

  7. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  8. 5 out of 5

    Eben

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dena Rothstein

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tia Malkin-fontecchio

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mia Mendez

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sara Boutin

  14. 5 out of 5

    Piyali Mukherjee

  15. 5 out of 5

    Colin

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ana Maria Otero-Cleves

  17. 5 out of 5

    Josh

  18. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rob Williams

  20. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  21. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  22. 4 out of 5

    Brant Roberts

  23. 4 out of 5

    G

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Ree

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  26. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  27. 4 out of 5

    Laura

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