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The Harbinger: The Ancient Mystery that Holds the Secret of America's Future

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Is it possible... That there exists an ancient mystery that holds the secret of America's future? That this mystery lies behind everything from 9/11 to the collapse of the global economy? That ancient harbingers of judgment are now manifesting in America? That God is sending America a prophetic message of what is yet to come? Before its end as a nation, there appeared in ancien Is it possible... That there exists an ancient mystery that holds the secret of America's future? That this mystery lies behind everything from 9/11 to the collapse of the global economy? That ancient harbingers of judgment are now manifesting in America? That God is sending America a prophetic message of what is yet to come? Before its end as a nation, there appeared in ancient Israel nine specific warnings and omens of national destruction – These same nine Harbingers are now manifesting in America with profound ramifications for America’s future and end-time prophecy. Hidden in an ancient biblical prophecy from Isaiah, the mysteries revealed in The Harbinger are so precise that they foretell recent American events down to the exact days… the 3,000-year-old mystery that revealed the exact date of the stock market collapse of 2008… the ancient prophecy that was proclaimed from the floor of the US Senate and then came true…and more. The revelations are so specific that even the most hardened skeptic will find it hard to put down. Though it sounds like the plot of a Hollywood thriller – IT’S REAL. The prophetic mysteries are factual but revealed through a riveting narrative the reader will find hard to put down. The Harbinger opens with the appearance of a man burdened with a message he has received from a mysterious figure called The Prophet. The Prophet has given him nine seals, each containing a message about America s future. As he tells of his encounters with the Prophet, from a skyscraper in New York City, to a rural mountaintop, to Capitol Hill, to Ground Zero, the mystery behind each seal is revealed. As the story unfolds, each revelation becomes another piece in a larger and larger puzzle, the ramifications of which are, even now, altering the course of America and the world.


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Is it possible... That there exists an ancient mystery that holds the secret of America's future? That this mystery lies behind everything from 9/11 to the collapse of the global economy? That ancient harbingers of judgment are now manifesting in America? That God is sending America a prophetic message of what is yet to come? Before its end as a nation, there appeared in ancien Is it possible... That there exists an ancient mystery that holds the secret of America's future? That this mystery lies behind everything from 9/11 to the collapse of the global economy? That ancient harbingers of judgment are now manifesting in America? That God is sending America a prophetic message of what is yet to come? Before its end as a nation, there appeared in ancient Israel nine specific warnings and omens of national destruction – These same nine Harbingers are now manifesting in America with profound ramifications for America’s future and end-time prophecy. Hidden in an ancient biblical prophecy from Isaiah, the mysteries revealed in The Harbinger are so precise that they foretell recent American events down to the exact days… the 3,000-year-old mystery that revealed the exact date of the stock market collapse of 2008… the ancient prophecy that was proclaimed from the floor of the US Senate and then came true…and more. The revelations are so specific that even the most hardened skeptic will find it hard to put down. Though it sounds like the plot of a Hollywood thriller – IT’S REAL. The prophetic mysteries are factual but revealed through a riveting narrative the reader will find hard to put down. The Harbinger opens with the appearance of a man burdened with a message he has received from a mysterious figure called The Prophet. The Prophet has given him nine seals, each containing a message about America s future. As he tells of his encounters with the Prophet, from a skyscraper in New York City, to a rural mountaintop, to Capitol Hill, to Ground Zero, the mystery behind each seal is revealed. As the story unfolds, each revelation becomes another piece in a larger and larger puzzle, the ramifications of which are, even now, altering the course of America and the world.

30 review for The Harbinger: The Ancient Mystery that Holds the Secret of America's Future

  1. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    First off, know this about me: I am simultaneously a man of intense faith and rigorous scientific/analytical background. I believe in God. I am also an computer engineer/scientist. My life is a constant journey toward understanding the harmony between spirituality and science. Before deciding to read this book, I prayed. I asked God to give me guidance. If this was a deceptive work whose purpose was to entangle my mind in crazy, supernatural delusions (and their accompanying flights of fantasy), First off, know this about me: I am simultaneously a man of intense faith and rigorous scientific/analytical background. I believe in God. I am also an computer engineer/scientist. My life is a constant journey toward understanding the harmony between spirituality and science. Before deciding to read this book, I prayed. I asked God to give me guidance. If this was a deceptive work whose purpose was to entangle my mind in crazy, supernatural delusions (and their accompanying flights of fantasy), I asked that He turn me away. If, on the other hand, there was a message within worth hearing, I asked Him to give me the proverbial "eyes to see and ears to hear". The result? It's currently been 5 hours since I purchased the book. Between then and now, I stopped only to eat dinner; in every other second, I devoured this text. And now, having completed it, here I am, carrying a heart that simultaneously feels immense hope and incredible heaviness. Without spoiling the particulars, this book details (in narrative form) the author's encounter with a man who makes statements befitting a slightly modernized Old Testament prophet. As his base of discussion, this man uses scripture found in Isaiah 9:10 (which details Israel's defiant response to the siege laid against it by Assyria); what follows is an amazing, heart-wrenching account of how those same events -- and their consequences -- have come to unfold in the United States. 10 pages in, I was interested. 50 pages in, I was slightly skeptical. 125 pages in, I began to consider the validity of what was being said. 150 pages in...and my eyes began to open. This is a grand story that teeters on the edge of impossible, but which, when considered carefully, strikes a chord that often accompanies the deepest truth. Once I'd completed this, I went to my Bible. With apologies for how "do-this-for-me" my request seemed, I asked God to once more show me if what I'd read had any measure of truth. I asked Him to show me through Scripture (which doesn't conform to -- and isn't bound by -- fantasy or supernatural leaps of nonsense) whether this meant anything. Somehow, I opened directly to Isaiah 9:10. I'm not one to believe in chance or happenstance; you be the judge as to whether this was coincidence. For the reader who is brave enough to read this book, put its contents under the microscope of whatever world view he subscribes to, and merely listen, there is much to examine here. At its core, it is simultaneously a message of hope and ominousness, disobedience and repentance, rebellion and the call to return. Try, for a moment, to suspend the box into which you fit the world; allow yourself the opportunity to consider something outside of your everyday experience. You won't regret it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carly

    This is a challenging review to write because The Harbinger is not your average, ordinary book. Yes, it is considered Suspense Fiction, but there really isn’t much fiction here. There was a time when I considered people who felt that 9/11 was God’s judgment on this country to be crazy, frankly. I still find that to be a very risky statement to make, but in The Harbinger, Johnathan Cahn has been given the vision and wisdom from God to see, from a biblical perspective, this concept as he draws the This is a challenging review to write because The Harbinger is not your average, ordinary book. Yes, it is considered Suspense Fiction, but there really isn’t much fiction here. There was a time when I considered people who felt that 9/11 was God’s judgment on this country to be crazy, frankly. I still find that to be a very risky statement to make, but in The Harbinger, Johnathan Cahn has been given the vision and wisdom from God to see, from a biblical perspective, this concept as he draws the parallels of modern times in America to ancient Israel. This book has done something to change my feelings about the possibility that God is judging this country because He wants us to turn back to Him. We as a nation, have drifted away from Godly ways and principles and He is reaching His hands out to us to bring us back to Him. He has clearly given us the warning signs, which Johnathan lays out in fascinating detail in The Harbinger. The similarities between our modern times and ancient Israel are way too striking for it to be a coincidence. This is not my garden variety book review because The Harbinger is not your everyday, run-of-the-mill book. It is a very carefully drawn out warning for our country. If we heed the warning, God will bless us and put up that hedge of protection. I personally find that to be amazing and comforting. This book is certainly a must read, not for the entertainment value, but the eternal value.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Eyehavenofilter

    Get out yer Bibles folks and keep track, cause the end is near according to Cahn. Personally, I think we have turned into the most self absorbed, self-centered, conpicuously consumptive nation on earth and our acceptence of the profane and the need for self pacification overwhelms the desire to do anything for anyone else but us. Yeah yeah I know but, hey read this book, I think it COULD/ might/ may change something! Hopefully how you think, perceive, and/or want our country to proceed! ?????? Before yo Get out yer Bibles folks and keep track, cause the end is near according to Cahn. Personally, I think we have turned into the most self absorbed, self-centered, conpicuously consumptive nation on earth and our acceptence of the profane and the need for self pacification overwhelms the desire to do anything for anyone else but us. Yeah yeah I know but, hey read this book, I think it COULD/ might/ may change something! Hopefully how you think, perceive, and/or want our country to proceed! ?????? Before you go all psycho on me, read my other reviews, and know that I love a good mind bender just like the next reader, usually more, 'specially if my mind feels like it's gone throgh a cuisineart, from what I've read. So..... give this a-tilt-a-whirl reader ride!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Heidi Willis

    I have a hard time rating this. The idea of this "story" is supposed to be shocking and eye-opening, and it's true that it is - mostly because it is purported to be based on facts. The author uses a verse in the Bible that warns Old Testament Israel about coming judgment if it doesn't repent against catastrophic happening in the U.S., specifically 9/11 and the collapse of the stock market. There obviously is a tremendous amount of research that has gone into this book, and clearly the author's in I have a hard time rating this. The idea of this "story" is supposed to be shocking and eye-opening, and it's true that it is - mostly because it is purported to be based on facts. The author uses a verse in the Bible that warns Old Testament Israel about coming judgment if it doesn't repent against catastrophic happening in the U.S., specifically 9/11 and the collapse of the stock market. There obviously is a tremendous amount of research that has gone into this book, and clearly the author's intent is to reach as many people as possible with this information. This book is not to entertain; it's to make people think, and then act. It has the potential to be very powerful, and many readers have found it to be that way. Unfortunately, for me the poor "narrative writing" aspect of this book overshadowed everything else. It is as if the author wanted to get this information out there, and thought this was the best way to get people to read. And maybe more people will read this than would read a non-fiction examination of the events, but I found the format tedious. Essentially, the book is two very long dialogues. There is very little narrative, little happening other than the mere explanation of what the harbingers mean. There is, in this questioning, an inordinate amount of repetition. A character asks a question, the other characters says the same words back, and the first character repeats it again. This happens over and over. The material in this novel is fascinating, there is no doubt about that. It's worth the read for that alone. But the material IS strong enough to stand on its own, and I for one would have enjoyed this more in a non-fiction format where the lack of story elements would not have bothered me.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ben Zajdel

    This is one of the worst books I've ever read. The dialogue is cliche, it's hard to understand which character is speaking, and there is absolutely no character development. The prose is non-existent. There are often pages and pages of nothing but dialogue. The author has chosen one obscure verse (Prayer of Jabez style) from Isaiah to base his entire book around (Isaiah 9:10). The mental, hermeneutical, and historical gymnastics that are needed to draw a parallel between ancient Israel and modern This is one of the worst books I've ever read. The dialogue is cliche, it's hard to understand which character is speaking, and there is absolutely no character development. The prose is non-existent. There are often pages and pages of nothing but dialogue. The author has chosen one obscure verse (Prayer of Jabez style) from Isaiah to base his entire book around (Isaiah 9:10). The mental, hermeneutical, and historical gymnastics that are needed to draw a parallel between ancient Israel and modern day America are astounding. Cahn's main character claims that 9/11 was the first of a series of 9 harbingers of destruction, just as the Assyrian invasion of Israel in 8th century BC was a harbinger of the destruction of the nation of Israel. The book then goes on to list the eight other harbingers, such as a sycamore tree at Ground Zero and Al-Qaeda being related to the Assyrians. No joke. This book was completely boring, completely plays on people's fears, and is a complete waste of time. The only reason I slogged through it is because it is so popular at the moment. Do yourself a favor and never read it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn Harper

    This book is listed in the fiction section for a reason. While touting that what it contains is true, the book uses far fetched ideas and a poorly constructed narrative to get the author's point across. Cahn wants America to turn back to God, that much is obvious, but he uses national tragedies to scare people into believing his story. The first half of the book discusses nine harbingers (signs) that tell us America is doomed. I was actually on board with the first two harbingers, as they seemed This book is listed in the fiction section for a reason. While touting that what it contains is true, the book uses far fetched ideas and a poorly constructed narrative to get the author's point across. Cahn wants America to turn back to God, that much is obvious, but he uses national tragedies to scare people into believing his story. The first half of the book discusses nine harbingers (signs) that tell us America is doomed. I was actually on board with the first two harbingers, as they seemed to make sense. Cahn paralleled what happened to ancient Israel with what is currently happening to America. He describes the attacks on September 11 as the first harbinger, or sign. Subsequent terrorist attacks are the second sign, he claims, just as the Assyrians who attacked ancient Israel were "masters of terror." However, it is at this point that Cahn deviates from his story. Instead of just giving parallels, he picks out a single verse of the Bible (Isaiah 9:10) for the base of the other seven harbingers. The four lines of scripture give us signs with gradually increasing implausibility. My personal favorite was the eighth sign which included "America's leaders" making vows against God. What was Cahn's proof? The 2004 democratic vice presidential candidate referenced Isaiah 9:10 in a speech. I wouldn't call the VP candidate for the losing party a leader qualified enough to make vows that affect the whole country. Cahn also depends heavily on commentaries to give added evidence to his single verse. Apparently there wasn't enough Biblical support for what he was trying to prove. The second half of the book discusses other signs that America is being warned. The economic collapse that has followed 9/11 is his main point. He claims that we've entered a cycle of a "wiping of debts" that recurs every seven years. This has a parallel in the Old Testament, true, but there is no indication anywhere that America is bound to the same laws. This wiping of debts, he claims, is the reason for the falling stock market in September of 2001 as well as the crash in 2008. The reason we're expected to believe that America is bound to the same laws and rules for obeying God as ancient Israel (and can therefore expect the same signs and judgments) is because America was founded on Biblical principles. No, not because of the founding fathers, but because of the pilgrims who came over seeking religious freedom. Because of select groups of settlers, the entire modern nation of America is doomed to destruction unless we focus our attention back on God. Do you believe it? I don't.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    I believe this book was given to me for a reason and now I feel that reason is to pass it along to others who might feel the way I did and still do about this country. This book unlocks so many mysteries about America and the comparison between Israel. America was once a holy and spiritual ground blessed by our Lord that has since turned away from Him. This book delivers a message so striking and unbelievable that you have to read it to believe it. Only through prayer can we save this country. G I believe this book was given to me for a reason and now I feel that reason is to pass it along to others who might feel the way I did and still do about this country. This book unlocks so many mysteries about America and the comparison between Israel. America was once a holy and spiritual ground blessed by our Lord that has since turned away from Him. This book delivers a message so striking and unbelievable that you have to read it to believe it. Only through prayer can we save this country. God must help us and it's only through Him. This is a must read. Please read this and pray for our country! It's on the brink of destruction and only God can help. After you read this pass it along!!!!!!!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gary Potratz

    I don't feel it is right to quote a senator and what he says and then make the claim that America is defiant and take the temperature of the nation on one person's comment. I also don't feel we should be compared to Israel....although there are similarities. We are a nation that is self-centered and self-indulgent for the most part, but I don't compare myself with the country as a whole. There are a ton of generous and compassionate Christians in the country who are praying diligently for this coun I don't feel it is right to quote a senator and what he says and then make the claim that America is defiant and take the temperature of the nation on one person's comment. I also don't feel we should be compared to Israel....although there are similarities. We are a nation that is self-centered and self-indulgent for the most part, but I don't compare myself with the country as a whole. There are a ton of generous and compassionate Christians in the country who are praying diligently for this country. If the book gets more people to do that, then it is a good thing. Here is a review I found and I feel the same way as this person: Is America in covenant with God? Is America the “new Israel”? Certainly, not all scholars think so. Monsma says, “...it is irresponsible for us evangelicals, who have a high view of Scripture, to apply the promises and warnings made in the Old Testament to the present day United States. There is no biblical basis for believing that God has made a special covenant with the United States or named Americans as his chosen people. Today God works through his worldwide church, which is drawn out of “every nation, tribe, people and language” (Rev. 7:9), not through a special, chosen nation. The United States is not the equivalent of Old Testament Israel.” (Steve Monsma, Healing for a Broken World, Crossway Books, 2008, page 22.) It is nothing more than sensationalism and I don't care about sensationalism.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Poiema

    I am giving this book 5 stars solely because the author manages to be very convincing about the urgency of the message. I found the back-and-forth dialogue a little wearying but still it was used effectively in driving home the point that America has been warned by God (on 9/11) and judgment hangs over us like the sword of Damocles. Cahn uses Isaiah 9:10 as the heart of his message, pertaining to the demise of ancient Israel's northern kingdom. The pattern of warning, defiance, destruction, and I am giving this book 5 stars solely because the author manages to be very convincing about the urgency of the message. I found the back-and-forth dialogue a little wearying but still it was used effectively in driving home the point that America has been warned by God (on 9/11) and judgment hangs over us like the sword of Damocles. Cahn uses Isaiah 9:10 as the heart of his message, pertaining to the demise of ancient Israel's northern kingdom. The pattern of warning, defiance, destruction, and uprooting is chillingly similar to events that have transpired in America's recent history. I pray it is not too late for our country to experience another great spiritual awakening. This book is valuable for trumpeting the message to "return" to God and even if it doesn't make a significant impact on the nation it will certainly be an instrument to call astute individuals to repentance. There is a day of judgement and wisdom tells us not to delay dealing with either our personal OR our national sins.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    I read this book at the urging of my father-in-law, a 72-year-old Christian from the Silent Generation with a strong interest in Biblical prophecy. Since his normal reading fare is non-fiction, I was intrigued when he told me, “It’s written as a story, but it’s all true.” As a moderately conservative (or conservatively moderate) Christian from the Gen-X generation, I was immediately skeptical with the description on the book’s outside cover, “Though it sounds like the plot of a Hollywood thrille I read this book at the urging of my father-in-law, a 72-year-old Christian from the Silent Generation with a strong interest in Biblical prophecy. Since his normal reading fare is non-fiction, I was intrigued when he told me, “It’s written as a story, but it’s all true.” As a moderately conservative (or conservatively moderate) Christian from the Gen-X generation, I was immediately skeptical with the description on the book’s outside cover, “Though it sounds like the plot of a Hollywood thriller – it’s real,” and from the inside dedication page, “What you are about to read is presented in the form of a story, but what is contained within the story is real.” While the story is well written and engaging, I struggled immensely with the author’s claims, particularly throughout the first half of the book. Bear in mind, I agree with the author’s overall premise. Over the past 50 to 100 years, America has turned away from God. We are in jeopardy of judgment, and yes, many of the events happening in America today are more likely than not the consequences of our sin and disobedience. Yes, individually and collectively, we must turn from our sins to faith in God or risk the consequences of a life and a culture outside of His perfect will. However, I struggled with many of the author’s claims, particularly since I was confused as to which he meant as “truth” and which he used to develop the story. As the pages unfolded, my skepticism grew. Although I’m not a theologian, I am concerned when a single verse of Scripture is taken out of context, and I firmly believe that individual passages cannot be accurately interpreted apart from the entirety of Scripture and the Gospel message. In itself, the author’s use of Isaiah 9:10 was troubling, but even more troubling was the manner in which he specifically and mystically linked pieces of the verse to specific events in recent American history. I don’t believe the actions of America’s leaders immediately following 9/11 were an act of defiance against God – an act of defiance against America’s enemies, yes; but an act of defiance against God? No. I also don’t agree that because Isaiah 9:10 was spoken aloud by government leaders they somehow mystically and unwittingly opened the door for God’s judgment simply by speaking them. To be fair, as the book progressed, I began to enjoy it more, and I was particularly intrigued with the link between 9/11 and America’s financial collapse. While I still struggle to believe that this was somehow mystically engineered, I agree that God allows a person, a family, a community and a culture to experience the consequences of their own decisions. When we follow God, His Spirit helps us to make decisions that transform us into the people, communities and cultures He wants us to be. When we don’t, the challenges are much more difficult, if not impossible. In spite of the struggles I’ve outlined, however, the book is worth your time, particularly if you are a fan of Joel Rosenberg, Tim LaHaye or Hal Lindsey. My only caution is to read it as fiction. Glean the truths you can from it, but remember it is a fiction story. And “do not forget this one thing, dear friends: With the Lord a day is like a thousand years and a thousand years like one day. The Lord is not slow in keeping his promise, as some understand slowness. He is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance” (1 Peter 3:8-9).

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rhonda

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is a non-fiction book written as a novel. It is written mostly as a dialogue between several people and in that format it succeeds moderately well. I did object to the repetition of certain points as if the reader were too stupid to get it the first time, but then perhaps this message deserved to drive points home again and again. Those interested in eschatological themes will no doubt be drawn to its subject matter which is the parallel between the ancient judgment of Israel (predominantly This is a non-fiction book written as a novel. It is written mostly as a dialogue between several people and in that format it succeeds moderately well. I did object to the repetition of certain points as if the reader were too stupid to get it the first time, but then perhaps this message deserved to drive points home again and again. Those interested in eschatological themes will no doubt be drawn to its subject matter which is the parallel between the ancient judgment of Israel (predominantly the northern kingdom in 722 BCE) and modern America. At the end of the book, there is considerable discussion on what it means to take an unpleasant message to someone. It is easy to think of Jeremiah's case. I often think about him when God asks people, including myself, to do things. After all, Jeremiah, sometimes known as the weeping prophet, was given a message so unpopular with the people of Judah to whom he preached that they reviled him and threw him into a pit. One cannot help but believe things got worse after that. You see, it would be at this point that perhaps Jeremiah asked why God had sent him with such an unpopular message and why God is allowing others to abuse him. God must have explained the extreme urgency of the message (and indeed the fall of Jerusalem was imminent.) In addition God says that he will not allow anyone to kill Jeremiah. I have often wondered whether Jeremiah had any doubts after this. There is no use arguing the truth of this book to those who cannot or will not see it. At the end of the book, the potential writer of this book, now having received all the information (which he will soon be composing into what we are apparently now reading) makes the statement, "It's not exactly the kind (of message) that wins popularity contests, is it?" A few lines later, he makes a similar statement: "They'll do everything they can to attack and discredit the one who bears the message." The other agrees and says, "The messenger will be opposed, vilified and hated, mocked and slandered. It has to be that way, just as it was for Jeremiah and Baruch." No one with such a message sets out to be glorified or achieve fame. One wonders why one would accept such a mission then...or why God chose them for such. Perhaps others scoff at delusional thinking...and I have seen reviews of this book to that effect. I am, personally, persuaded of the insight and truth contained in this book. Further, I have wondered how America has managed so long after its expunging of God from the public domain and the setting up of its many idols and demi-gods in its place. Our sacrifices of our children to Moloch and Baal are no less now than they were then and we should be terribly humbled and sad and repentant...but, for the most part we are not. Perhaps in reading this book, even if the percentages are low, maybe 1 person out of five might see its truth and make the necessary changes, that would be worthwhile. I would hope it would be everyone, but I am not naive enough to believe that we have not become arrogant and proud and scoffers of the one who granted us the great blessings in our own country. Still I realize and I now pray that God wishes that we might still return to Him in humility. I hope the message makes it through all the garbage we have placed between ourselves and God's will for us.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chrissy

    I'm really torn on giving 5 stars for this book. I will say the stars are solely based on the information in it--it is completely astounding. But the writing and storyline to convey this information is overly juvenile, extremely contrived, and just bad writing so much so that I found myself skimming most of the interaction dialogue between characters to get to the meat of the information. In other words, its a horrible book saved by the factual information and research in it that is so compellin I'm really torn on giving 5 stars for this book. I will say the stars are solely based on the information in it--it is completely astounding. But the writing and storyline to convey this information is overly juvenile, extremely contrived, and just bad writing so much so that I found myself skimming most of the interaction dialogue between characters to get to the meat of the information. In other words, its a horrible book saved by the factual information and research in it that is so compelling. If anyone wants a truly compelling indication of the state of our country, this book is it. Throughout the Bible God reveals patterns. The author shows the pattern of the destruction of Israel by the Assyrians as recorded in Isaiah 9:10 being repeated here in America. Beginning with 9/11, the author breaks down this scripture and show how America follows this pattern EXACTLY. Lest you think this is just someone's application of scripture to explain the event, there is AMAZING sourcing to prove where American leaders have stood in specific locations, quoted specific things, witnessed specific events, and circumstances that are so specific, so deliberate, and so precise that unless you believe in God, you will likely be apt to think its made up. Thankfully the author gives you all of the references so you can research it for yourself. This book convinced me that my sorrow and mourning for America over the last few years hasn't been misapplied. This nation founded upon God (and it IS true regardless of what some people desire to be true)has essentially thumbed her nose at the One who allowed her to become great. While I love my country, I love my God more. This book only confirms that I need to pray for America more--not for her greatness, but for her return to God.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Keiki Hendrix

    Knowing the enormous impact this book has had on this nation and it's position on the New York Times Bestseller list since the day it went into print, if you ask me if all the facts included in this novel are accurate or if the references are correct, I'd have to repeat a phrase repeatedly mentioned in the book, "I have no idea." All the Scripture references are indeed correct and the historical facts, well, there were far too many of them for me to research. This is novel, a work of fiction. Th Knowing the enormous impact this book has had on this nation and it's position on the New York Times Bestseller list since the day it went into print, if you ask me if all the facts included in this novel are accurate or if the references are correct, I'd have to repeat a phrase repeatedly mentioned in the book, "I have no idea." All the Scripture references are indeed correct and the historical facts, well, there were far too many of them for me to research. This is novel, a work of fiction. Though the author clearly maintains the message, the harbingers or warnings signs, are real. The story compares the judgement of Israel to modern day events beginning with 911 and the economical implosion of 2008. It's an evangelical call to repentance, a megaphone to wake the sleeping wrapped up in a parable. Is it prophetical? To me, it stirred quite a few emotions. But then, I am already of the mind that America indeed needs to return to the principles it was founded on. I have a unshakable opinion that we have (or are working towards) escorting God out the door of our culture like a pauper who crashes a posh upscale party. II Chronicles 7:14 is etched in my mind when I begin to pray. So, does that make me predisposed to like this book? I'm not a theologian, a pastor or a preacher. I'm just a Christian that yearns for America to repent. I do know that the message of this book, to return to God, is prominent. The events that it includes are relative. The description of a merciful, loving Savior clearly proclaims the message of Christianity. Can it be that 911 and subsequent events are the judgement of God on America? I've read several reviews of the book from prominent theologians which are critical of the book, however, my thoughts are that it's the message that's important here. No Christian critic of the book can rail against the overall theme, which is to repent. But, many will be critical of the comparisons of America and Israel or pick apart particular parts of the book and claim they are heretical. Are they correct? I have no idea. What I do know is that as a novel, this book was compelling. It's pace was energetic, the plot was mysterious and engaging, and the dialogue was strong. It captured my attention from the first chapter and I read it in two days. As a reviewer, that makes for a compelling, enjoyable read. Reviewed by: Keiki Hendrix Reviewed for: The Vessel Project

  14. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    The Harbinger, by author Jonathan Cahn, is in my opinion, a cross between The DaVinci Code and the script for National Treasure. While the message is a good one (America needs to return to God because judgment is coming and it ain't going to be pretty), the way the book was written should not, in my opinion, been labelled as a novel, for it lacks all the elements that make a novel great. For example, there is no character development. It simply starts with a conversation. There is very little desc The Harbinger, by author Jonathan Cahn, is in my opinion, a cross between The DaVinci Code and the script for National Treasure. While the message is a good one (America needs to return to God because judgment is coming and it ain't going to be pretty), the way the book was written should not, in my opinion, been labelled as a novel, for it lacks all the elements that make a novel great. For example, there is no character development. It simply starts with a conversation. There is very little description of the settings and the dialogue - OH! THE DIALOGUE! The author chose to have his story told through three characters, which is why the book reads like a script. The characters do more than talk though. They repeat several times over what the other character is saying. Honestly, it was like watching a tennis match! You say "potato" and I'll repeat it four times to make sure you heard me. Such was the dialogue in this book. While I believe both Old and New Testament scripture speaks to every generation, at times I wondered about Cahn's theories. He has done his research to back up his claims, there is no mistaking that, but at times he seemed to really be stretching things to make his theories fit. He does however do a good job trying to convince you that what he has to say is prophetic. In fact, he does such a good job that you might actually believe what he has written. Strangely, I hope you do believe him. Despite the bad writing, his heart is in the right place - we are all headed for judgment. Whether or not America faces another catastrophe like 9/11, the ultimate day of calamity is still to come. The question we all need to ask ourselves in light of this is - will you be ready to face Christ when He returns? Are you ready for judgment?

  15. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    If you have a reading list, you might want to put this on the top! Or forget the list and just get started on this one!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    "The Harbinger" was okay however I have a few problems, the author states that the Founding Fathers saw America as the new Israel, which they did, but America was not the new Israel. It may be true that the Founding Fathers believed we were in a covenant with God (like Israel) but we were not. When he states that our falling and/or rising would depend on our relationship with the Lord; that is actually true of any community and/or nation. America may have wanted to be a vessel of redemption, and "The Harbinger" was okay however I have a few problems, the author states that the Founding Fathers saw America as the new Israel, which they did, but America was not the new Israel. It may be true that the Founding Fathers believed we were in a covenant with God (like Israel) but we were not. When he states that our falling and/or rising would depend on our relationship with the Lord; that is actually true of any community and/or nation. America may have wanted to be a vessel of redemption, and we have done much good, more than any other nation, but we were never a vessel of redemption. We were, as a nation never promised blessings from God nor did God ever pronounce any curses on us. One can fine many parallels in scripture with many countries, circumstances etc. They can be very interesting and one can find many lessons in these. We just need to be careful that we don't state that this parallel means this or that in a dogmatic way. Cahn (the author) appears to variously overstate his case, see prophetic fulfillment where arguably none exists and presses details to draw parallels between historical events beyond what the facts reasonably support. I will just state that I do not believe that Isaiah 9:10-11 contains a hidden second prophecy directed to modern America. If one remembers that this is fiction then we are fine, although I did not find this all that well written and/or engaging.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tessa in Mid-Michigan

    Normally I skim books on prophecy and the "end of the world." Well, the nonfiction ones, anyway. I am pretty well-versed on these issues, and most nonfiction books are basic introductory knowledge and repetitive. This one isn't. Written as fiction, it is quite effective in the literary tool chosen. It immediately reminded me of Tolkien's The Hobbit, in which Gandalf needs to take all the dwarves and Bilbo to Beorn's house for help, but he knows that Beorn won't want them. So Gandalf cleverly go Normally I skim books on prophecy and the "end of the world." Well, the nonfiction ones, anyway. I am pretty well-versed on these issues, and most nonfiction books are basic introductory knowledge and repetitive. This one isn't. Written as fiction, it is quite effective in the literary tool chosen. It immediately reminded me of Tolkien's The Hobbit, in which Gandalf needs to take all the dwarves and Bilbo to Beorn's house for help, but he knows that Beorn won't want them. So Gandalf cleverly goes ahead with just Bilbo, telling the others to wait for his whistle before coming, slowly, in pairs. Meanwhile, he has started telling their story to Beorn, and he gets Beorn avidly listening. At the appropriate moment, Gandalf admits there are more than just two of them, at which he whistles and continues with their adventures. Beorn gets more intrigued, paying little attention to the dwarves, until finally all 15 have arrived. A similar tool is used here, in which the main character, Nouriel, is trying to interest a media anchorwoman in his story. He begins and, by that night, she is just as enthralled. She clears her calendar, sends everyone home, and stays late to hear him out. Nouriel's story is of a clay seal sent to him in the mail, no sender, no clues. Then he meets a man, seated on the bench Nouriel chose, who recognizes the seal and begins to tell him about it, eventually giving him a different seal in exchange for the first one. Nouriel realizes it is no coincidence he picked this bench, that someone placed them together. Through many amazing meetings, the prophet reveals what the seals mean, uncovering a series of warnings for the USA that have been drawn from Old Testament passages. Cahn makes an excellent case in this book, backing up the warnings with actual events that seem impossible, but are backed up by footnotes from extremely reliable sources. Even the White House. This extremely well-done book is highly recommended to anyone interested in Christian prophecy and America's place in the world. ~ Tessa Eger 5 out of 5 stars

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    I'm choosing not to put this on any of my shelves other than the "read" shelf. It doesn't truly fit any of the others (well possibly one of the fantasy shelves) but aspires to be political and religious. I noted another review here (which was a 2 star) that started with "full disclosure, I'm an atheist". Well, full disclosure, I'm a Christian. This book is okay on the political and religious level in some ways but walks the line so awkwardly that it sort of stumbles on both counts. I don't blame I'm choosing not to put this on any of my shelves other than the "read" shelf. It doesn't truly fit any of the others (well possibly one of the fantasy shelves) but aspires to be political and religious. I noted another review here (which was a 2 star) that started with "full disclosure, I'm an atheist". Well, full disclosure, I'm a Christian. This book is okay on the political and religious level in some ways but walks the line so awkwardly that it sort of stumbles on both counts. I don't blame the Christians here who don't care for it any more than do the atheists. There is little actual understanding in the religious side of the story, though I don't totally disagree (for example I don't find the general idea of turning from God bringing about loss of blessings) still there a holes in the story. (view spoiler)[ Spoiler mostly for Christian readers. While I don't totally disagree with the parallel between Ancient Israel and the U.S. we should not forget the Covenant that Israel failed to keep and that brought about what happened to them was the actual Old Covenant. The US was (despite what many are trying to teach now) founded on (among other things) the right to worship as one understands God. Many of the persecuted Christian groups fled here. And yes, even at the time of the Revolution most of the founders were Christian. America was not founded as a secular country. That's modern propaganda and purely political. It's not beyond the realm of belief that America has enjoyed God's blessings because of His plans and the predominantly Christian nature of the country [of course if you're not Christian you don't believe that and I understand. That's fine. Again Freedom of religion is as mentioned a corner stone of America's founding]. I think a more apt comparison from the Bible might have been that of Sodom and Gomorrah where God told Abraham that if there were still 10 righteous people in the cities they wouldn't be destroyed. America has obviously gone down hill and the book is correct to point out the continual removal of God from America's public life. (Note that the president has "uninvited" the Christian clergyman from his inauguration because he prays "in the name of Christ". He did this in the name of "tolerance". Many Christians are finding we're the one's who are supposed to be tolerant as we are one of the few minorities that can still be insulted, belittled and discriminated against publicly). So, I have no problem with the premise that America is losing God's special blessings, I just don't care for the confusion over the Old Covenant as it leads into the New Covenant under Christ. (hide spoiler)] The political part of this book is pretty much on the mark, though many will simply dismiss it out of hand because of the religious content. I'd suggest that you try to read with an open mind as there is some good stuff among the "story" This may lead to the book doing a lot of what's called "preaching to the choir" as it's primary audience may end up being people who already agree with it's basic premise. Finally I go down to a 3 star rating simply because of some of the writing. I found some of it a bit annoying, especially some of the dialogue. There's lots of "he said.....", "He answered..." and "....he asked", ...."he answered". It's what I once heard called "Tom Swift dialogue". It gets a little old. Short choppy sentences and so on. So, not too bad. A book I'd say read and at least give yourself a shot at disagreeing with it intelligently. Not great writing but not the worst I've read. A middle of the road 3 it's not down to a I barley finished it but it's not awful 2. Maybe 2.5???? See what you think.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Seger

    I have two major issues with this book. First, the entire premise of the book - that the US is reliving what Israel went thru in biblical times - is a complete misunderstanding of the Old Testament. The Old Testament was not written to show a pattern of how to live & not to live. It was written to show us that all people & nations live wrong, but God is sending a redeemer, His Son Jesus. And second, the narrative is very poorly written & redundant, which makes it hard to read. I was Mr. Cahn wou I have two major issues with this book. First, the entire premise of the book - that the US is reliving what Israel went thru in biblical times - is a complete misunderstanding of the Old Testament. The Old Testament was not written to show a pattern of how to live & not to live. It was written to show us that all people & nations live wrong, but God is sending a redeemer, His Son Jesus. And second, the narrative is very poorly written & redundant, which makes it hard to read. I was Mr. Cahn would have just laid out what he believed in 50 pages instead of taking 250 to do so. Despite these two misgivings, one summary point from the book is helpful. Repent. Whether what Mr. Cahn writes is true or not, this will always remain true. We all are in need of repentance from sin, turning from our sin to our Savior.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gwendolyn Gage

    It wasn't a non-fiction book as I had expected. Rabbi Cahn wrote it in the form of a story to make it an easier read for those who have a hard time making it through non-fiction. Don't pick this up expecting a great novel--there is no characterization, little scene movement, and the writing isn't brilliant. Most of the book is dialogue (much untagged), but then Rabbi Cahn isn't a novelist. He's a messenger with a very important message. Personally, I didn't have any problem getting through the b It wasn't a non-fiction book as I had expected. Rabbi Cahn wrote it in the form of a story to make it an easier read for those who have a hard time making it through non-fiction. Don't pick this up expecting a great novel--there is no characterization, little scene movement, and the writing isn't brilliant. Most of the book is dialogue (much untagged), but then Rabbi Cahn isn't a novelist. He's a messenger with a very important message. Personally, I didn't have any problem getting through the book, and finished it in two days--the mind-boggling revelations drove me onward. Every American should read The Harbinger. It's hard to think of 9/11 as a Divine judgement and warning, but as Rabbi Cahn compares the tragedy to Scripture and the last days of ancient Israel, the evidence becomes clear, shedding new light on America's frightening response, and the economic troubles that followed. I learned something new about our country's beginnings. Did you know that New York City was our nation's first capital (not D.C.), and the little church at Ground Zero was the place where this nation was first consecrated to God as George Washington's first act as the first President of the United States? The place where the twin towers came down really is symbolic and full of meaning in a way that no one realizes, and this is only one detail out of many presented in The Harbinger. So does America have a future? Is there hope? Not without God. We need to heed God's warning, repent, and turn back to Him as a nation. Only then will He restore the hedge of protection that has kept America safe and propserous all these years.

  21. 5 out of 5

    John Bascom

    A disappointing book, the writing was sophomoric; the dialogue flat and unconvincing; and the plot, if one can call it that, predictable, dull and an insult to the intelligence. Extraordinarily repetitive, too. It was honestly painful to read. The book was essentially the pulpit for a sermon on the author's own view that America has lost its moral compass and is being warned (punished?) by God through events such as Nine-Eleven and the recent financial/economic meltdown. Of course he fails to add A disappointing book, the writing was sophomoric; the dialogue flat and unconvincing; and the plot, if one can call it that, predictable, dull and an insult to the intelligence. Extraordinarily repetitive, too. It was honestly painful to read. The book was essentially the pulpit for a sermon on the author's own view that America has lost its moral compass and is being warned (punished?) by God through events such as Nine-Eleven and the recent financial/economic meltdown. Of course he fails to address the facts that, even in our nation's more moral days, we have always had national tragedies such as the Great Depression, the dust bowl, the burning of Washington DC during the War of 1812, the Civil War, WWI & II, race riots and on and on. I, too, cringe at the moral decay that can be observed and don't deny anyone their religious views. But if you're going to write a book, at least show some literary skill, Mr. Cahn. The only reason I didn't give it one-star was the research and imagination shown in linking Biblical and historical facts to present day circumstances. If you're a fundamentalist, born-again Christian (nothing wrong with that), you'll likely LOVE this book for its message (many rated it five-stars). But if you're looking for a good book to read, better choose something else.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Marialyce (absltmom, yaya)

    There is no way in which I could assign a star rating to a book such as this. I can urge others to read it though and that I do. It is a book that allows those who believe in God to affirm that belief and realize that the world in America has gone astray. We, who have been granted so much by God, are falling away from him and are beginning to see the warning signs of a country that is falling into ruin. The author paints a very vivid and compelling parallel to the fall of Israel and the coming fa There is no way in which I could assign a star rating to a book such as this. I can urge others to read it though and that I do. It is a book that allows those who believe in God to affirm that belief and realize that the world in America has gone astray. We, who have been granted so much by God, are falling away from him and are beginning to see the warning signs of a country that is falling into ruin. The author paints a very vivid and compelling parallel to the fall of Israel and the coming fall of America. Fascinating in its parallels and most conclusively pointing out that 9/11 was a huge call for our nation to return to the love of God. This has happened before and now it is happening to America. Of course to the naysayers, this book will not have any impact. They will argue that the existence of God is false, that there is not any afterlife, and that they are entitled to belittle and degrade those who profess a belief in a Divine Being. However, this nation was founded on Judeo Christian beliefs that allowed us to with the help, blessing, and love of God to make this the greatest nation on Earth. How we are losing that wonderful place in God's bosom is the focus of this book. Can we come back, can we be forgiven? Yes, the author contends through one word and that is love...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Theodore

    The book started out kind of rough, like the author was trying to present a concept by writing a fiction story around it and it didn't quite fit. It seemed like he was stretching things to make a point. I almost quit reading, but I am glad I stuck with it. The parallels between ancient Israel at the time of the Assyrian invasions and the US at the time of 9/11 are eerie. There couldn't possibly be that many random coincidences! I had a hard time believing some of the facts presented, but upon ch The book started out kind of rough, like the author was trying to present a concept by writing a fiction story around it and it didn't quite fit. It seemed like he was stretching things to make a point. I almost quit reading, but I am glad I stuck with it. The parallels between ancient Israel at the time of the Assyrian invasions and the US at the time of 9/11 are eerie. There couldn't possibly be that many random coincidences! I had a hard time believing some of the facts presented, but upon checking them out they all appeared to be true! The book motivated me to the need to put aside unimportant things and begin to try to bring people back to God and the Bible. Whether you agree with all the author wrote or not, we really need to pray for our nation - time is getting short.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    Wow. The ego of a book like this. Of course, America is the "new holy land". Basically, the founders of the good old U.S.A. made a covenant with God that God would make us the most wealthy, blessed, and powerful country if we helped the poor and gave hope to the oppressed. And it happened - just as the founders prophesied. (Hmmmm...tell the slaves that.) But, now we are turning from God by taking prayers out of our schools, and making the very mention of the names of God and Jesus taboo. Oh, and Wow. The ego of a book like this. Of course, America is the "new holy land". Basically, the founders of the good old U.S.A. made a covenant with God that God would make us the most wealthy, blessed, and powerful country if we helped the poor and gave hope to the oppressed. And it happened - just as the founders prophesied. (Hmmmm...tell the slaves that.) But, now we are turning from God by taking prayers out of our schools, and making the very mention of the names of God and Jesus taboo. Oh, and porn. Because then, "Children were taught of sexual immorality in public schools while the Word of God was banned." Damn. Where did this guy go to school? Oh, and abortion. Don't forget abortion. (I kept wondering when he was going to get to The Gays™.) And this gets to the point - and the name - of this book. Because teachers cannot lead Christian prayers in a public school in a country with freedom of religion, and because we are not allowed to say Jesus in public (wait, what?), and because of porn and abortion: "America's hedge [of protection] has already been removed and the Nine Harbingers have been manifested." Aw, crap. Stupid porn. Because we drove God "out of our schools, out of our government, out of our media, out of our culture, out of our public square..." we had 9/11. It's a wake up call. [Can I just take a sidebar and note how tired I am of people trying to put the idea out there that Christians are somehow persecuted? These people want you to believe that America wasn't founded on the idea of freedom of religion, but that it was founded on the idea that Christians should be free to practice their religion.] Oh, and by the way, Isaiah 9:10 predicted 9/11. When Isaiah says, “The bricks have fallen, but we will build with dressed stones; the sycamores have been cut down, but we will put cedars in their place.” This predicts that (1) America will be attacked by (2) terrorists (3) who will destroy the two towers, (4) our leaders will vow to rebuild a [Freedom] tower in defiance of God, (5) which has a great [Freedom] stone in its foundation which would be removed, (6) a sycamore tree would get knocked down when the towers fell, (7) the sycamore tree would be replaced by cedars in defiance of God, (8) the leaders would speak from Washington, D.C. (including Hillary Clinton quoting this very verse,), and, finally (9) Senate Majority Leader Daschle would quote this verse to defy God by rebuilding. These are the 9 harbingers giving the book its name. The 9 harbingers that prove that 9/11 was a wakeup call from God. What else do you need? And it even (somehow) predicted the economic crash exactly 7 years later in September 2008. (That one is a little fuzzy to me, still.) So - all we have to do to get God's blessings back, according to Isaiah 9:10, is to put prayer back in public schools. Why didn't I see that before? And we better get on that, because according to Isaiah 9:11, something worse will happen if we don't. The mental gymnastics you have to make to follow the logic in this book is insane. Of course, the narrative has someone telling a story to a skeptic that ends up a believer in the end. I think this is probably a good way to evangelize an insane idea - present it as a narrative instead of as fact - but the narrative is "true" (cf, Dan Brown). One thing I found interesting was that as a way of connecting Isaiah 9:10 to 9/11 is that the author treats commentaries at about the same level as the Biblical text, for example, comparing speeches from political leaders on 9/11 to words found in commentaries on Isaiah 9:10. I am just amazed that people can be sucked in by this stuff. Is Christianity so boring that we have to dress it up with made up prophecies to make it interesting? Oh wait - did you know that the very place the founding fathers dedicated this country to God was Ground Zero? Maybe the author is right...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dennis

    The American Dream is looking more and more like a national nightmare. Ten years since 9/11 and our nation spirals ever more downward each day with millions looking for an answer to our future. If you have been questioning currents events, The Harbinger provides the answers and a remedy. The reader is taken on a journey that begins over two thousand years ago linking it with our nation today as Jonathan Cahn unlocks an ancient mystery linked to America and her future. If you were sitting in a jury The American Dream is looking more and more like a national nightmare. Ten years since 9/11 and our nation spirals ever more downward each day with millions looking for an answer to our future. If you have been questioning currents events, The Harbinger provides the answers and a remedy. The reader is taken on a journey that begins over two thousand years ago linking it with our nation today as Jonathan Cahn unlocks an ancient mystery linked to America and her future. If you were sitting in a jury box with America on trial, and listened to the facts presented by the author,the only verdict possible is GUILTY beyond a reasonable doubt. It is not too late for our nation and its people to self-correct. The warning has been sent. Ignore it at your own peril.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marsha

    The harbinger is fiction that challenged my faith to see God at work in my life and in the life of our country. It is a wake-up call for all Americans to see how important it is to keep God in our leadership and our laws.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Our nation attacked, unawares. Many lives lost. A day that will live in infamy. This book was not what I expected in a lot of ways. I was expecting a suspenseful Christian end-times thriller since the book was listed as fiction. I started reading and waited and waited for the plot to pick up... and it didn't. I was disappointed. So then I tried to read the book as nonfiction told in story form. And I found that I could not buy the idea that God was judging us as a nation by allowing the 9/11 atta Our nation attacked, unawares. Many lives lost. A day that will live in infamy. This book was not what I expected in a lot of ways. I was expecting a suspenseful Christian end-times thriller since the book was listed as fiction. I started reading and waited and waited for the plot to pick up... and it didn't. I was disappointed. So then I tried to read the book as nonfiction told in story form. And I found that I could not buy the idea that God was judging us as a nation by allowing the 9/11 attacks to happen. I had heard that arguement at the time they happened - the Chancellor of my university was a big proponent of it. And I'm not saying it's not possible - but I would debate the logic, when you consider that our country has been attacked before in a similar way. I speak, of course, of Pearl Harbor, the original "infamous day". Our country was attacked even though we were trying to stay neutral in a world war. Was that God telling us not to close our eyes to Hitler's atrocious and systematic murders of European Jews? Perhaps the good rabbi could write a sequel explaining why the "hedge of protection" has failed us before. There must be some other obscure verse from the Bible who could explan it. I'm not being snarky, I promise. We all want to try and make sense of what was, to put it mildly, a terrible loss of life. We wonder why God allowed it to happen and we wonder if there was something we as a nation could have done. What we, as Christians could have done before then to turn our nation back to God. Which, by the way, is something I agree needs to happen - the ultimate message of the book is why I'm not writing the work off as a whole. I just don't necessarily believe it was a judgement - although it should have been a wake-up call most assuredly. A nation is made up, however, of individuals - individuals with free will. And Christians who are doing their jobs should be living their lives not only to honor God, but to testify to the truth that the rest of the nation needs to see. We don't have to stand on a corner waving a Bible and shouting at people to repent - I've found that that method rarely earns more than derisive eyerolls. Just live a godly life - I believe that's all God asks of us. I think it was St. Francis of Assisi who said "preach the Gospel - and use words if necessary". That's how I choose to live out my faith,anyway. That's just my opinion. I don't expect anyone else to agree with me, so you can take it or leave it.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    A MUST READ!!!!!! THE MOST IMPORTANT BOOK FOR OUR TIME!!!!!!!!!!!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Michael L Gowens

    A compelling read with questionable hermeneutics (the science of biblical interpretation). The author's basic premise, i.e. that America, like the northern kingdom of Israel in the 8th Century BC, is in a cultural and moral free-fall and consequently, headed for a similar judgment as other nations and cities before it, is legitimate. The author's insistence on interpreting the historical prophecy in Isaiah 9:10 as a hidden message to America, however, is unconventional and inconsistent with the A compelling read with questionable hermeneutics (the science of biblical interpretation). The author's basic premise, i.e. that America, like the northern kingdom of Israel in the 8th Century BC, is in a cultural and moral free-fall and consequently, headed for a similar judgment as other nations and cities before it, is legitimate. The author's insistence on interpreting the historical prophecy in Isaiah 9:10 as a hidden message to America, however, is unconventional and inconsistent with the principles of classical biblical interpretation. I do admit, however, that the parallels he draws between the language of Isaiah 9:10 and the repetition of that language by public officials in the aftermath of 9/11 is intriguing, as well as a number of the other connections he makes between the original prophecy and the physical circumstances surrounding the collapse of two World Trade Centers. But the entire premise of interpreting Scripture by looking for puzzles, hidden meanings, esoteric messages, and 'reading between the lines' is fundamentally contrary to classical Christian hermeneutics, for it jettisons the principle of the perspicuity, or clarity and transparency, of Scripture. As a story based on the principle that the Bible contains esoteric codes and messages, The Harbinger fits in the same genre as The Shack. Furthermore, the author assumes a connection between ancient Israel and modern America with no attempt to establish such a connection biblically. Though it is possible that 9/11 was a Divine judgment on our increasingly apostate society--another assumption the author makes-it is not possible to know for certain. It is just as possible that it was simply another terrible example of human depravity and moral antagonism toward the West. I do concur with Mr Cahn that unless we repent, we shall likewise perish. To take this book as anything more than an interesting and compelling read, however, requires the reader to conclude that Divine revelation and the prophetic office are ongoing dynamics in the post-apostolic age. Apart from certain groups with tendencies toward mysticism, I am not familiar with many mainline Christians who would countenance such an idea.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Franklin Atherton

    The Harbinger is a solid piece of work about a guy to whom a secret is revealed which is so shocking it changes the purpose of his life. A prophet appears mysteriously for a series of meetings with our guy. He commences to teach him (and us) an ancient mystery involving the Jewish civilization turning its back on God and it's resulting destruction, and how history is on the cusp of repeating itself for the precise same reasons here in the U.S. Jonathan Cahn presents a ton of information in this b The Harbinger is a solid piece of work about a guy to whom a secret is revealed which is so shocking it changes the purpose of his life. A prophet appears mysteriously for a series of meetings with our guy. He commences to teach him (and us) an ancient mystery involving the Jewish civilization turning its back on God and it's resulting destruction, and how history is on the cusp of repeating itself for the precise same reasons here in the U.S. Jonathan Cahn presents a ton of information in this book. The revelation itself is very intricate. He manages to unravel and organize a confusing maze of historical facts and occurrences so that we end up where we need to be, knowing what we need to know, as if he's done this before. Teaching is a gift that not everyone possesses. That is, just because someone knows something doesn't mean they know how to impart that knowledge to someone else. Jonathan Cahn has that ability. A more heavy-handed editor might have slashed the occasional redundancy, but I believe repetition is the best way to remember the material. So, I say this is a job well done, inspiring and terrifying at the same time. Oh, yeah. Did I mention we're all doomed? Huh. Musta forgot.

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