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Elliot lost her first husband to murder in the South American jungle and her second to the ravages of cancer. In The Path of Loneliness she gives hope to the lonely through reflections on God's love and his blessings. Elliot lost her first husband to murder in the South American jungle and her second to the ravages of cancer. In The Path of Loneliness she gives hope to the lonely through reflections on God's love and his blessings.


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Elliot lost her first husband to murder in the South American jungle and her second to the ravages of cancer. In The Path of Loneliness she gives hope to the lonely through reflections on God's love and his blessings. Elliot lost her first husband to murder in the South American jungle and her second to the ravages of cancer. In The Path of Loneliness she gives hope to the lonely through reflections on God's love and his blessings.

30 review for The Path of Loneliness: Finding Your Way Through the Wilderness to God

  1. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Rollins

    Excellent treatise on trusting God when you feel all alone. Short chapters, perfect for daily devotional readings. The beautiful thing about Elisabeth Elliot is that she is very comfortable in her belief system and bold in speech.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Trace

    VERY STRONG 4.5 STAR RATING! I wish there were more female Christian writers that are cut from the same cloth as Elisabeth Elliot. She always says it like it is. She is not shy about holding to her traditional, biblical values - and she'll challenge you to do the same. She doesn't feel the need to be "politically correct" or overly accommodating in her thoughts. At times, she may even make you squirm. But you will forgive her, or at least I do because you know its coming from a place of personal VERY STRONG 4.5 STAR RATING! I wish there were more female Christian writers that are cut from the same cloth as Elisabeth Elliot. She always says it like it is. She is not shy about holding to her traditional, biblical values - and she'll challenge you to do the same. She doesn't feel the need to be "politically correct" or overly accommodating in her thoughts. At times, she may even make you squirm. But you will forgive her, or at least I do because you know its coming from a place of personal experience. One knows that she's not asking you to walk where she hasn't herself walked. Plus, she just has a way about her...a way with her words that inspires respect while she's holding you to higher standards. Like a pithy, but very loving grandmother! :) I wrote more than 5 pages of notes and quotes from this book, and this was just from my first reading. She gives you a LOT to think about on the topic of loneliness. I finished the book feeling enlightened and content. Just SOME of the quotes that gave me food for thought: "Turn your loneliness into solitude and your solitude into prayer." “Loneliness is a wilderness, but through receiving it as a gift, accepting it from the hand of God and offering it back to him with thanksgiving, it may become a pathway to holiness, to glory and to God himself.” “God has promised to supply our needs. What we don’t have now we don’t need now.” "Even loneliness may be a form of selfishness. One can reject friendship when it is not offered on the terms one chooses. One can reject the grace of God as Naaman the leper came perilously close to doing because it was not offered with the kind of ceremony he felt befitted his station. One can magnify his loneliness out of all proportion, as though he suffered something that is not common to man, forgetting that "this is life"- not more, not less. One can draw about himself a thick quilt of self- pity and isolate himself in other ways, but if one turns the loneliness into solitude and the solitude into prayer, there is release. " "To walk with Him is to walk the Way of the Cross. If the cross we are asked to take up is not presented to us in the form of martyrdom, heroic action of some kind, dragons or labyrinths or even "ministry"---at least something that looks spiritual---are we to conclude that He has waived the requirement? He never waives the requirement. There is a pot of gold, there is a king's reward, but it comes at the end of the journey. Yet all along the way there are countless joys if only we will taste and see that the Lord is good."

  3. 5 out of 5

    Marian

    I really wanted to like this book more than I did. There is some good guidance on living a full life in the midst of loneliness and committing yourself to God. I appreciated the various poetry, literature, and hymn references - these were my favorite parts. I think as someone who has already spent many years in gifting loneliness to God, and is still struggling with it, there was not a lot here that brought me comfort. Things that have helped me recently: 1) getting out of a "waiting" mindset - p I really wanted to like this book more than I did. There is some good guidance on living a full life in the midst of loneliness and committing yourself to God. I appreciated the various poetry, literature, and hymn references - these were my favorite parts. I think as someone who has already spent many years in gifting loneliness to God, and is still struggling with it, there was not a lot here that brought me comfort. Things that have helped me recently: 1) getting out of a "waiting" mindset - perpetually waiting or expecting something to happen can be really harmful 2) embracing stoicism and existentialism from a Christian perspective (i.e. reading Kierkegaard, Seneca) 3) understanding the role of free will in the world, free will which God gives to all people and which He often allows to run its course (good or bad) 4) remembering Christ's own life of suffering, which Elliot does talk about (a highlight of the book) Lastly I was personally a bit troubled by her views on dating...according to her, women should wait not seek, arranged marriages are better (?!). I lean conservative myself, but I don't think this is healthy advice. This is not a book on dating, but just a heads up in case you are giving it to teenagers.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    We all become lonely at some point in our lives. It's a painful journey wandering through the wilderness. The author points the reader to God who satisfies all our needs. She reminds us to turn our loneliness into solitude and our solitude into prayer. We all become lonely at some point in our lives. It's a painful journey wandering through the wilderness. The author points the reader to God who satisfies all our needs. She reminds us to turn our loneliness into solitude and our solitude into prayer.

  5. 5 out of 5

    E.G. Bella

    I have such admiration and respect for Elisabeth Elliot, and this book was just what I hoped it would be. Her accounts of her single and waiting days, being widowed (twice), and all the lessons God's taught her through those events are a very needed reminder that - no matter where we are in life - it's okay. God is there, God is working, and God has a plan. Even when we're unsure and lonely, we can trust that this moment serves a greater purpose. We may not know what the future holds, but we kno I have such admiration and respect for Elisabeth Elliot, and this book was just what I hoped it would be. Her accounts of her single and waiting days, being widowed (twice), and all the lessons God's taught her through those events are a very needed reminder that - no matter where we are in life - it's okay. God is there, God is working, and God has a plan. Even when we're unsure and lonely, we can trust that this moment serves a greater purpose. We may not know what the future holds, but we know Who holds the future. This book served as timely encouragement to keep the faith and simply focus on walking with God day by day, not being anxious or allowing loneliness to swallow us - but to offer it to God as a sacrifice and trust Him to bring blessings from it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mary Rachel Fenrick

    I’d give this book 6 out of 5 stars if I could. I just finished reading it and already want to start from the beginning and read the entire thing again. So much wisdom and hope in its pages!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Debbi

    Tremendous book. Written not to tickle your ears, but to reflect His truth and demonstrate more clearly our choice every circumstance. Highly recommend. "In circumstances for which there is no final answer in the world, we have two choices: accept them as God’s wise and loving choices for our blessing (this is called faith) or resent them as reproof of His indifference, His carelessness, even His nonexistence (this is unbelief)…although as the world looks at things, we may be solo, we are not, a Tremendous book. Written not to tickle your ears, but to reflect His truth and demonstrate more clearly our choice every circumstance. Highly recommend. "In circumstances for which there is no final answer in the world, we have two choices: accept them as God’s wise and loving choices for our blessing (this is called faith) or resent them as reproof of His indifference, His carelessness, even His nonexistence (this is unbelief)…although as the world looks at things, we may be solo, we are not, as God looks at things, solitary instruments. We belong to an orchestra and make harmony by playing our particular part of the score on the instrument given to us…The heart which has no agenda but God’s is the heart at leisure from itself. Its emptiness is filled with the Love of God. Its solitude can be turned into prayer…seeing loneliness as a gift – to be received, and to be offered back to God for His use." We have this promise, “I will woo her, I will go with her into the wilderness and comfort her: there I will restore her vineyards, turning the Vale of Trouble into the Gate of Hope” Hosea 2:14-15

  8. 5 out of 5

    Clara Roberts

    I did not know that Elisabeth Elliot was married only two years to husband number one before he was killed and four years to husband number two before he died of cancer. The book shows she had a deep love for all three of her husbands. My takeaway from this book is that many people marry thinking that a spouse will fill their every need. Some needs can only be filled by God. Many married people are among the most lonely.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Trisha

    Nothing less than an "amazing" rating for this book by Elliot, even though I would quibble with just a few of her points. One of Elliot's gifts is her knack for offering something to every reader who visits her writings, such as the long-time married woman who reads her book on Passion and Purity or the no-I'm-not-lonely person who reads this book on loneliness. So much encouragement and wisdom here. Nothing less than an "amazing" rating for this book by Elliot, even though I would quibble with just a few of her points. One of Elliot's gifts is her knack for offering something to every reader who visits her writings, such as the long-time married woman who reads her book on Passion and Purity or the no-I'm-not-lonely person who reads this book on loneliness. So much encouragement and wisdom here.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Emanuela

    It was an excellent book written with the heart, not only ink. Elisabeth Elliot shares her experience and others` as well concerning the struggle with loneliness and what to do with it, you should consider it as a gift and offer it to God so that He might do the best with what you have, you should turn it into solitude and solitude into prayer. I gladly recommend it to anyone seeking God`s will. It was an excellent book written with the heart, not only ink. Elisabeth Elliot shares her experience and others` as well concerning the struggle with loneliness and what to do with it, you should consider it as a gift and offer it to God so that He might do the best with what you have, you should turn it into solitude and solitude into prayer. I gladly recommend it to anyone seeking God`s will.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cassie

    Encouraging and useful for people in any stage of life.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Erin Simoni

    Wow! This book is amazing! The title might seem sad but the tone of the book is victorious. So far my favorite book of 2020. Everyone experiences loneliness. We might feel alone and misunderstood or just far away from those who know and love us. Or perhaps we’ve lost someone. Even though we feel and/or are alone we can experience peace and joy. Below are some of my favorite quotes: “Usually we love to too little and too sentimentally. Our love, God-given though it be, is usually iced up with pos Wow! This book is amazing! The title might seem sad but the tone of the book is victorious. So far my favorite book of 2020. Everyone experiences loneliness. We might feel alone and misunderstood or just far away from those who know and love us. Or perhaps we’ve lost someone. Even though we feel and/or are alone we can experience peace and joy. Below are some of my favorite quotes: “Usually we love to too little and too sentimentally. Our love, God-given though it be, is usually iced up with possessiveness and selfishness. It needs strengthening and purifying.” “There is no hope for any of us until we confess our helplessness. Then we are in a position to receive grace” “Our loneliness cannot always be fixed, but it can always be accepted as the very will of God for now, and that turns it into something beautiful. Perhaps it is like the field wherein lies the valuable treasure. We must buy the fried. It is no sun-drenched meadow embroidered with wildflowers. It is a bleak and empty place, but once we know it contains a jewel the whole picture changes. The empty scrap of forgotten land suddenly teams with possibilities. Here is something we can not only accept, but something worth selling everything to buy. In my case, ‘selling everything’ meant giving up the self-pity and the bitter questions. I do not mean we are to go out looking for chances to be lonely as possible. I am talking about acceptance of the inevitable. And when, through a willed act we receive this thing we do not want, them Loneliness, the name of the field nobody wants, is transformed into a place of hidden treasure”. “We don’t have now what we don’t need now” “Make God’s gift to you your oblation to Him. Lift up your hands. This is a physical act denoting your love, your acceptance, your thanksgiving, and your trust that the Lord will make something redemptive for the wholeness off the Body, even for the life of the world. Do not look for dramatic effects. There may be no discernible result...’it is a mistake to measure such things by introspection. He heard and answered. That is all there is to be. Let the answer be manifested in His own time and way’”.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Although the book addresses loneliness, I believe it speaks more to suffering and death (not just physical, but spiritual death). The content of this book kept drawing me back to believe in the God of all Love. The God who is in control; the God who is transforming my pain. I’m called back to faith, back to hope, back to Him, and who He said He really is. No longer to writhe, but to trust in pain, seeing Him create life out of death. He did it for His Son; watch Him do it in you. I am realizing Although the book addresses loneliness, I believe it speaks more to suffering and death (not just physical, but spiritual death). The content of this book kept drawing me back to believe in the God of all Love. The God who is in control; the God who is transforming my pain. I’m called back to faith, back to hope, back to Him, and who He said He really is. No longer to writhe, but to trust in pain, seeing Him create life out of death. He did it for His Son; watch Him do it in you. I am realizing as I walk with Him the kind of relationship He’s called me to—-not holding back anything. But He gave me all in His Son, so it’s an all-all exchange (60). It’s beyond me to do this. And yet, in the dying, it’s so full of grace…”first, last, and always” (63). I love how this book rehearses “distilled acts of faith and acceptance” (as Maud Monahan is quoted pg. 83). Look at Jesus—-look at how He learned obedience (92). Look at how He offered all, and now gives me something to offer, too, like a child a father has given money for which to buy a gift (95). Suffering, loneliness, death are all gifts. This is why the Gospel holds my soul's attention-—it is the reality of Jesus’ showing me God’s economy. Reversing EVERYTHING from suffering and death and rejection and shame and loss to “every knee will bow and tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord.” Will I go with Him? That is the invitation of the book (112). Favorite Quotes: “Those who only watch and pray and try to put themselves in the place of the bereaved find it almost unendurable. Sometimes they weep uncontrollably, for their imaginations never include the grace.” pgs. 12-13 “But safety, as the Cross shows, does not exclude suffering…trust in those strong arms means that even our suffering is under control. We are not doomed to meaninglessness. A loving Purpose is behind it all, a great tenderness even in the fierceness.” pg. 18 “Jesus knew that His joy lay in only one direction: the will of the Father. And so does ours. […] We may be earnestly desiring to be obedient and holy. But we may be missing the fact that it is here, where we happen to be at this moment and not in another place or another time, that we may learn to love Him—here where it seems He is not at work, where His will seems obscure or frightening, where He is not doing what we expected Him to do, where He is most absent. Here and nowhere else is the appointed place. If faith does not go to work here, it will not go to work at all. pg. 22 “The power of the Cross is not exemption from suffering but the very transformation of suffering.” pg. 26 “The coming of this transcendent authority into one’s life is bound to be an active thing, an immense disruption at times.” pg. 36 “At the Cross of Jesus our crosses are changed into gifts.” pg. 37 “My joy is becoming less dependent upon my own immediate circumstances and more attached to what He is doing.” Bonnie’s letter, pg. 45 “Deeper and deeper must be the dying, for wider and fuller is the lifetide that it is to liberate—no longer limited by the narrow range of our own being, but with endless powers of multiplying in other souls. Death must reach the very springs of our nature to set it free: it is not this thing or that thing that must go now: it is blindly, helplessly, recklessly, our very selves. A dying must come upon all that would hinder God’s working through us—all interests, all impulses, all energies that are ‘born of the flesh’—all that is merely human and apart from His Spirit.” Lilias Trotter, Parables of the Cross, pgs. 54-55 “We have been shown the way of acceptance on every page of the life of Jesus. It sprang from love and from trust. He set His face like a flint toward Jerusalem. He took up the Cross of His own will. No one could take His life from Him. He deliberately laid it down. He calls us to take up our crosses. That is a different thing from capitulation or resignation. It is a glad and voluntary YES to the conditions we meet on our journey with Him, because these are the conditions He wants us to share with Him. Events are the sacraments of the Will of God—-that is, they are visible signs of an invisible Reality. These provide the very place where we may learn to love and trust.” pg. 82 “In circumstances for which there is no final answer in the world, we have two choices: accept them as God’s wise and loving choice for our blessing (this is called faith), or resent them as proof of His indifference, His carelessness, even His non-existence (this is unbelief).” pg. 89 “When a man or woman, a boy or girl, accepts the way of loneliness for Christ’s sake, there are cosmic ramifications. That person, in a secret transaction with God, actually does something for the life of the world. This seems almost inconceivable, yet it is true, for it is one part of the mystery of suffering which has been revealed to us. […] Each time my heart in love to Christ says YES when my human nature says NO, there the Cross is taken up. There I become a little more like my Master, there I live in Him, there I participate in His work of fulfilling the Father’s will on earth.” pg. 108 “…He knows that spiritual stamina cannot develop without conflict. We must take with both hands the thing given, submissively, humbly, sometimes courageously, or even, as one friend put it, ‘defiantly’—saying to ourselves, This is part of the story, the story of the love of God for me and of my love for Him. This is acceptance in the truest sense.” pg. 114 “My theme is oblation—the offering up of ourselves, all we are, have, do, and suffer. Sacrifice means something received and something offered.” pg. 117 “The heart which has no agenda but God’s is the heart at leisure from itself. Its emptiness is filled with the Love of God. Its solitude can be turned into prayer.” pg. 131 “When waiting is an act of obedience it is of course an invisible one. Only the One waited on sees it for what it is, but we must resist the temptation to defend and explain to our critics, and simply go on trusting.” pg. 133 “Take it honestly to Him…He will understand…Waiting on God is an act of faith—the greatest thing ever required of us humans. Not faith in the outcome we are dictating to God, but faith in His character, faith in Himself. It is resting in the perfect confidence that He will guide in the right way, at the right time. He will supply our need. He will fulfill His word. He will give us the very best if we trust Him.” pg. 139 “Waiting is an offering and a sacrifice. We may lift up our very waiting to Him as a daily oblation, in a spirit of expectancy—like Linda’s, who asks daily only for God’s agenda. Waiting on God in this way is true faith—no agenda of one’s own, no deadlines, no demands on what God must do. Simply an open heart and open hands ready to receive that which God shall choose, and a perfect confidence that what He chooses will be better than our best.” pg. 140

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jenni D

    “For every look at self—take ten looks at Christ! Live near to Jesus—and all things will appear little to you in comparison with eternal realities.” Robert Murray McCheyne This is the Path of Loneliness!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kyleigh Dunn

    This book isn't just about loneliness; it was one of the most helpful things I read while trying to make sense of my suffering with postpartum depression. She focuses on loneliness, but most of what she says can be applied more broadly to suffering in general. First read 2018, re-read 2021. This book isn't just about loneliness; it was one of the most helpful things I read while trying to make sense of my suffering with postpartum depression. She focuses on loneliness, but most of what she says can be applied more broadly to suffering in general. First read 2018, re-read 2021.

  16. 5 out of 5

    The-vault

    By:Elisabeth Elliot Grade: A+ Lonliness comes over us sometimes as a sudden tide. It is one of the terms of humanness, and, in a sense, therefore, incurable. Yet I have found peace in my lonliest times not only through acceptance of the situation, but through making it an offering to God, who can transfigure it into something good for others. -Elisabeth Elliot What I really like about this author is that she had been in two marriages that both ended with death and when she wrote this book she was i By:Elisabeth Elliot Grade: A+ Lonliness comes over us sometimes as a sudden tide. It is one of the terms of humanness, and, in a sense, therefore, incurable. Yet I have found peace in my lonliest times not only through acceptance of the situation, but through making it an offering to God, who can transfigure it into something good for others. -Elisabeth Elliot What I really like about this author is that she had been in two marriages that both ended with death and when she wrote this book she was in her third marriage. So first, she wasn’t talking to a crowd that was experiencing something she hadn’t been through. She made sure she didn’t even talk of types of loneliness she hadn’t experienced. And second, she is a testemant that things can get better. For those who might not be familliar with Elisabeth Elliot, her first husband, Jim Elliot, was a missionary who was killed while trying to witness to Waodani Indians in Ecuador. Years later Elisabeth returned and witnessed those same Indians. This all helps me to believe that when she says she has gone through terrible loneliness, she has indeed. Elliot presents the book in short manageble chapters. The whole book isn’t very thick itself but an honest and heartlfelt message that could fill the thickest volume is written in an easy to understand manner. She would say certain things that surprised me. Even though there is a bit of a time and age difference between me and the date of publication and the age of the author, she seems to understand the lonliness that people go through, even today. And it made me feel that people who are lonely aren’t alone in their suffering. One thing I really liked about this book, and I kind of alluded to it earlier, was that she told stories of her life and also wrote in letters she has recieved from others asking her how to deal with loneliness. One particular thing that struck with me about the letters was that they were recent to the publication of the book and that we, the readers, didn’t necessarily know how it turned out for those people. And I think some of us really value it when people don’t try to fix things or give us stories of triumphs. Sometimes we just want company when we’re sad and nothing more. Elisabeth Elliot also used examples from some religous historical figures like St. Teresa of Jesus, poems – like the ones by Amy Charmichael – and Bible references to illustrate how there can be peace in loneliness through God. How depravity, bitterness, and an over all sick and weak spirit is not the only option when dealing with loneliness. She said that we need to accept the position we’ve been put in and expect, believe, and have faith that God’s plan is only for our good and is better than anything we’ve got planned. But you have got to read the book to see how she showed how our loneliness can be transformed into something great for God. All of the examples, the applications, the implications. I don’t feel I have the authority or rhetoric that can effectively communicate it to a wide audience like Elliot has. I’m still mulling over it all myself. She just really touched on how suffering seems to be linked with glory. And I can see that. Because if you look at the people who have done great things in this world they have usually endured some type of suffering. If you want an insightful read or want the story of your own life to have a progressing plot in the midst of lonliness I implore you to read this book. It’s a game changer even if you aren’t coming from a Christian background like Elisabeth Elliot. Originally reviewed at : www.the-vault.co.cc

  17. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Everyone faces the reality of loneliness now and again In this book, Elliot speaks from her place of widowhood into the loneliness that any and everyone has encountered at one point or another in life. Elliot draws out examples in Scripture where God uses loneliness, and she elaborates on the vague phrase "gift of singleness," in a way that many writers for young-adults fail to explain. This is, I think, one of Elisabeth Elliot's lesser known works. You might be more familiar with Through Gates Everyone faces the reality of loneliness now and again In this book, Elliot speaks from her place of widowhood into the loneliness that any and everyone has encountered at one point or another in life. Elliot draws out examples in Scripture where God uses loneliness, and she elaborates on the vague phrase "gift of singleness," in a way that many writers for young-adults fail to explain. This is, I think, one of Elisabeth Elliot's lesser known works. You might be more familiar with Through Gates of Splendor, or Shadow of the Almighty: The Life and Testament of Jim Elliot. The best thing about Elliot addressing this subject is that she identifies. If it were coming off as a survey of what Scripture has to say, minus the real-life examples she uses, and her personal struggles, I wouldn't have gotten the same kind of connection. Good read! It encouraged me.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jaclynn

    “It can be a wilderness. It can be a pathway to God.” “Loneliness comes over us sometimes as a sudden tide. It is one of the terms of our humanness, and, in a sense, therefore, incurable. Yet I have found peace in my loneliest times not only through acceptance of the situation, but through making it an offering to God, who can transfigure it into something for the good of others.” Loneliness is something that hits everyone at one time or another, those who are single, those who are married, those “It can be a wilderness. It can be a pathway to God.” “Loneliness comes over us sometimes as a sudden tide. It is one of the terms of our humanness, and, in a sense, therefore, incurable. Yet I have found peace in my loneliest times not only through acceptance of the situation, but through making it an offering to God, who can transfigure it into something for the good of others.” Loneliness is something that hits everyone at one time or another, those who are single, those who are married, those who are widowed. But Elisabeth shows us how we can turn our solitude into prayer, how we can go on in our waiting, and the beauty in the sacrifice. This was a book that I could fully relate to. We have the Lord’s promise, even in our loneliness that, “ I will woo her, I will go with her into the wilderness and comfort her: there I will restore her vineyards, turning the Vale of Trouble into the Gate of Hope.” Hosea 2:14-15

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    First reading: sometime in fall 2008 Second reading: May/June 2010 This is a really good book--honest, but full of truth. It talks about being lonely, but also about what to do with your loneliness. Here's my 2008 review: "One of the best Elliot books I have read so far. With kindness and honesty, Mrs. Elliot brings out the importance of offering whatever we are going through--be it loneliness or suffering or whatever--as a sacrifice to God and letting Him do what He will with it. She says "...my u First reading: sometime in fall 2008 Second reading: May/June 2010 This is a really good book--honest, but full of truth. It talks about being lonely, but also about what to do with your loneliness. Here's my 2008 review: "One of the best Elliot books I have read so far. With kindness and honesty, Mrs. Elliot brings out the importance of offering whatever we are going through--be it loneliness or suffering or whatever--as a sacrifice to God and letting Him do what He will with it. She says "...my understanding of sacrifice has been transformed. It has also transformed my life. The emphasis now is not on loss, privation, or a price to be paid. I see it as an act of intelligent worship, and as a gift God has given me to give back to Him in order that He may make something of it." "

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    A good example of Elisabeth Elliot at her best-this work offers honest answers to life's tough questions, even the ones that most Christians are afraid to ask. Elliot offers hope despite suffering, which she defines as having something we don't want or wanting something we don't have. According to this definition, we've all suffered, and have asked ourselves if there is a purpose in any of it and if it will ever go away. Elliot's response-there's a purpose if we give our pain to God and allow Hi A good example of Elisabeth Elliot at her best-this work offers honest answers to life's tough questions, even the ones that most Christians are afraid to ask. Elliot offers hope despite suffering, which she defines as having something we don't want or wanting something we don't have. According to this definition, we've all suffered, and have asked ourselves if there is a purpose in any of it and if it will ever go away. Elliot's response-there's a purpose if we give our pain to God and allow Him to use it to our own advantage by using it as an opportunity to exercise our faith, mature our understanding of Him, and give us fruit to bear so that we may impact other people's lives. As always, the work is sprinkled with many examples of real people, real pain, and real answers (not necessarily the theological ones you'd expect).

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Loneliness is hard. I like Elisabeth Elliot's analogy of a wilderness. It fits. The author is not afraid to share from her many and varied experiences of the pain of loneliness, and the solution that she found in offering the loneliness up to God. Make loneliness solitude, and solitude prayer, she says, but only after you have received God's gracious gift and offered back to Him yourself in whatever place and relationships (or lack of them) you are. I think her treatment of the subject is thorou Loneliness is hard. I like Elisabeth Elliot's analogy of a wilderness. It fits. The author is not afraid to share from her many and varied experiences of the pain of loneliness, and the solution that she found in offering the loneliness up to God. Make loneliness solitude, and solitude prayer, she says, but only after you have received God's gracious gift and offered back to Him yourself in whatever place and relationships (or lack of them) you are. I think her treatment of the subject is thorough. She gives from her experience and draws from the experience of some who have written to her. While she doesn't promise immediate release from pain and struggle, she points to the only genuine solution: trust in God and acceptance of His plan for each of us.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jeannie

    If you are struggling with a season of loneliness in your life, consider reading this book. Elisabeth Elliot writes of how giving the pain of loneliness over to God results in us being used by God to love and minister to others. I chose this book for my Lenten reading this year. It has helped me so much. The book closes with a description of a widow and how God powerfully used her to help others: "Her Valley of Baca (weeping) has been made a place of springs... She stands as irrefutable proof th If you are struggling with a season of loneliness in your life, consider reading this book. Elisabeth Elliot writes of how giving the pain of loneliness over to God results in us being used by God to love and minister to others. I chose this book for my Lenten reading this year. It has helped me so much. The book closes with a description of a widow and how God powerfully used her to help others: "Her Valley of Baca (weeping) has been made a place of springs... She stands as irrefutable proof that the answer to our loneliness is love- not our finding someone to love us, bur our surrendering to the God who has always loved us with an everlasting love. Loving Him is then expressed in a happy and full-hearted pouring out of ourselves in love to others."

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ami

    This book was given to me by a friend who has experienced similar grief, and she passed it on to me about a month after my husband died. The book is saturated with Scripture, and ministered to my heart in very specific ways. Ellisabeth Elliot, of course, relates perfectly to my thoughts and emotions having been widowed twice herself. She does a great job pointing out that in our various paths of loneliness, Christ is the answer and the One who truly satisfies. The Gospel is woven throughout. Thi This book was given to me by a friend who has experienced similar grief, and she passed it on to me about a month after my husband died. The book is saturated with Scripture, and ministered to my heart in very specific ways. Ellisabeth Elliot, of course, relates perfectly to my thoughts and emotions having been widowed twice herself. She does a great job pointing out that in our various paths of loneliness, Christ is the answer and the One who truly satisfies. The Gospel is woven throughout. This book would be a blessing to any Christian, for we all experience loneliness. God has definitely used this book to help me process thoughts and emotions in my roller coaster of grief.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Ng

    July 5, 2016 Who better than twice-widowed Elisabeth Elliot to expound on this wilderness that is loneliness? Reading this little book a second time was a balm to my soul, not only because I identify so keenly with these honest struggles - which she very clearly articulates - but also because every chapter points upward. She reminds us, also with the help of others who had reminded her, to fill the emptiness of our hearts with love for God and our neighbours. True waiting on God is not "doing not July 5, 2016 Who better than twice-widowed Elisabeth Elliot to expound on this wilderness that is loneliness? Reading this little book a second time was a balm to my soul, not only because I identify so keenly with these honest struggles - which she very clearly articulates - but also because every chapter points upward. She reminds us, also with the help of others who had reminded her, to fill the emptiness of our hearts with love for God and our neighbours. True waiting on God is not "doing nothing", it is an act of faith, not in the outcome we desire, but faith in God Himself.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Bielick

    In true Elisabeth Elliot form, this book served as a great reminder that our lives are not our own, and that our greatest happiness and fulfillment will be found in the pursuit of God's will over our own. That being said, there are many kinds of loneliness I hoped Elliot would address here. Instead, the book was primarily about the loneliness of being a single woman hoping for a husband. Perhaps if this were my personal circumstance, I woud have appreciated the narrowed focus more. In true Elisabeth Elliot form, this book served as a great reminder that our lives are not our own, and that our greatest happiness and fulfillment will be found in the pursuit of God's will over our own. That being said, there are many kinds of loneliness I hoped Elliot would address here. Instead, the book was primarily about the loneliness of being a single woman hoping for a husband. Perhaps if this were my personal circumstance, I woud have appreciated the narrowed focus more.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Corey

    A rare insight into the spiritual and personal challenges loneliness brings. Akin to Lewis' "Grief Observed," where he explores his own loss and loneliness, Mrs. Elliot studies the brokenness and opportunities within which loneliness operates. She also describes a humbler, higher way to tread the darker paths. In all a rich and invaluable read. A rare insight into the spiritual and personal challenges loneliness brings. Akin to Lewis' "Grief Observed," where he explores his own loss and loneliness, Mrs. Elliot studies the brokenness and opportunities within which loneliness operates. She also describes a humbler, higher way to tread the darker paths. In all a rich and invaluable read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Peyton

    As always; I love Elisabeth! She encourages and brings you down to earth! Love this book! Merged review: WOW!!! What a book! I read it in less than one day!!!;)This book talks about loneliness and how to give your loneliness to God! Thanks, Brittany for suggesting it! I enjoyed and and it gave me lots to think on!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Julianne Bell

    Excellent book that I'd recommend to anybody. Elisabeth Elliot communicates and teaches that you can make an oblation out of anything the Lord has given you, whether a joyous blessing or a sorrowful suffering. What matters is offering everything back to God to let him use it as He wills in your life. It's about God's agenda, not yours. Excellent book that I'd recommend to anybody. Elisabeth Elliot communicates and teaches that you can make an oblation out of anything the Lord has given you, whether a joyous blessing or a sorrowful suffering. What matters is offering everything back to God to let him use it as He wills in your life. It's about God's agenda, not yours.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    I read/perused this for my thesis paper. This book is easy to read and offers valuable counsel for those who have suffer from loneliness due to loss or due to singlehood. Elliot is points the lonely to God, showing that satisfaction must be found in Him (this holds true for all--not just the lonely). She also shows how God can use even your "gifting" of singleness to bless others. I read/perused this for my thesis paper. This book is easy to read and offers valuable counsel for those who have suffer from loneliness due to loss or due to singlehood. Elliot is points the lonely to God, showing that satisfaction must be found in Him (this holds true for all--not just the lonely). She also shows how God can use even your "gifting" of singleness to bless others.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stephaniequalls

    AMAZING read for those going through dark places. This was written by one of my favorite authors about the time following her husband's martyrdom. However it spoke to me at a chosen lonely time in my life and added such balm to my broken heart at the time. AMAZING read for those going through dark places. This was written by one of my favorite authors about the time following her husband's martyrdom. However it spoke to me at a chosen lonely time in my life and added such balm to my broken heart at the time.

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