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The Black Campus Movement: Black Students and the Racial Reconstitution of Higher Education, 1965-1972

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Between 1965 and 1972, African American students at upwards of a thousand historically black and white American colleges and universities organized, demanded, and protested for Black Studies, Black universities, new faces, new ideas—a relevant, diverse higher education. Black power inspired these black students, who were supported by white, Latino, Chicana, Asian American, Between 1965 and 1972, African American students at upwards of a thousand historically black and white American colleges and universities organized, demanded, and protested for Black Studies, Black universities, new faces, new ideas—a relevant, diverse higher education. Black power inspired these black students, who were supported by white, Latino, Chicana, Asian American, and Native American students.The Black Campus Movement provides the first national study of this intense and challenging struggle which disrupted and refashioned institutions in almost every state. This book also illuminates the complex context for one of the most transformative educational movements in American history through a history of black higher education and black student activism before 1965.


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Between 1965 and 1972, African American students at upwards of a thousand historically black and white American colleges and universities organized, demanded, and protested for Black Studies, Black universities, new faces, new ideas—a relevant, diverse higher education. Black power inspired these black students, who were supported by white, Latino, Chicana, Asian American, Between 1965 and 1972, African American students at upwards of a thousand historically black and white American colleges and universities organized, demanded, and protested for Black Studies, Black universities, new faces, new ideas—a relevant, diverse higher education. Black power inspired these black students, who were supported by white, Latino, Chicana, Asian American, and Native American students.The Black Campus Movement provides the first national study of this intense and challenging struggle which disrupted and refashioned institutions in almost every state. This book also illuminates the complex context for one of the most transformative educational movements in American history through a history of black higher education and black student activism before 1965.

30 review for The Black Campus Movement: Black Students and the Racial Reconstitution of Higher Education, 1965-1972

  1. 5 out of 5

    Zach

    "The Black Campus Movement" makes several important and exciting contributions to the study of student movements, universities, and black radicalism in the 20th century. Ibram X. Kendi dramatically extends the timeline of black student activism backward into the early 20th century, chronicling the self-activity of The New Negro College Movement as well as similarly understudied black student activism in the 1930s and 1940s. This alone would make this text a valuable one, but Kendi also offers a "The Black Campus Movement" makes several important and exciting contributions to the study of student movements, universities, and black radicalism in the 20th century. Ibram X. Kendi dramatically extends the timeline of black student activism backward into the early 20th century, chronicling the self-activity of The New Negro College Movement as well as similarly understudied black student activism in the 1930s and 1940s. This alone would make this text a valuable one, but Kendi also offers a deeply researched account of black student organizing in its more conventionally recognized high-water mark, from the mid-1950s through the early 1970s, with an impressive breadth and depth of archival research. I do have several criticisms of this book. Some are merely stylistic - at only 169 pages of text, (itself a feat,) one would hope that there would be room to avoid the idiosyncratic and distracting acronym system that the text adopts, rarely spelling out school names in full and instead relying upon a strange system of proper name plus hyphenation plus first initial of the type of institution, e.g., Cornell-U, Spellman-C, etc. There are also some problems with word choice, as when the author several times uses the word "rampage" to refer to black student protests. (This is problematic because of the racialized and animalized etymology of the phrase.). Both of these seem to me to be editorially-induced problems, and I hesitate to raise them here for that reason. Kendi outlines four pillars against which the black campus movements organized - the "moralized contraption," the "normalized mask of whiteness", the standardization of exclusion, and "ladder altruism." While the underlying concepts here are strong and helpful, the nomenclature is at times counterintuitive. Why altruism? Why contraption? Whether these were terms students themselves used or terms Kendi has himself fashioned is unclear in the text. Assuming the latter, the decision to go with "moralized contraption" over "moralizing ideology" remains curious. Kendi uses "ladder altruism" to describe an ideology of trickle-down leadership and hierarchy that conservative HBCUs sought to instill in students. He transposes ladder altruism against the "grassroots altruism" of student It's an important and useful concept, but again there is no explanation of why "altruism" is the relevant idea here and where this converges and where it breaks with other such ideologies of leadership, service, and power. There are other, more theoretical questions -- the relationship between revolutionary nationalism and Marxism-Leninism/Maoism and Cedric Robinson's Black Radical Tradition, that might have been taken up more as well. However, this remains an important and impressive work of historical scholarship, particularly exciting for its highlighting of the long black campus movement's roots in the early decades of the 20th century.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    I read this in 2018 for my history class--I'm afraid when I deleted my "grad school readings" shelf, I deleted a lot of books. Ugh. This was the first text by Kendi I'd read, and this book is important, because the Black Campus Movement was an important part of the larger Black Power Movement. I learned a lot, and it was great to see a mention of my alma mater, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, and its role in the movement.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Took a whole to read because he gets bogged down in some strange abbreviations and repetition. Solid, though depressing, point about the origins of campus activism going back to the 1920s and tying into current problems that linger. M

  4. 4 out of 5

    Hong

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dee Em

  6. 4 out of 5

    Gregory Jones

  7. 4 out of 5

    Crazyarms777

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alexis Johnson

  10. 5 out of 5

    Magdalena

  11. 4 out of 5

    Zuzia

  12. 4 out of 5

    Janae Uribe

  13. 4 out of 5

    Omowale Jabali

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jihad Uhuru

  15. 5 out of 5

    Keith Wood

  16. 4 out of 5

    Malik Newton

  17. 5 out of 5

    Renee Leehim

  18. 5 out of 5

    S.byndom

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

  20. 4 out of 5

    Grace

  21. 4 out of 5

    Philip

  22. 5 out of 5

    Zach

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brett Doze

  24. 5 out of 5

    Fra692

  25. 4 out of 5

    Maxine

  26. 5 out of 5

    Weckea

  27. 4 out of 5

    Allison

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tim

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chris Garcia-Wilde

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

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