counter create hit The Big Kahuna: Turning Tax & Welfare In New Zealand On Its Head - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Big Kahuna: Turning Tax & Welfare In New Zealand On Its Head

Availability: Ready to download

One day, when he was contributing to the Tax and Welfare Working Group, economist Gareth Morgan made an off-the-cuff remark that the solution to all of New Zealand's tax and welfare woes lay in abolishing the present welfare system and radically overhauling the tax system. He called this idea the big kahuna. The Big Kahuna takes as its base assumption that we don't, as a One day, when he was contributing to the Tax and Welfare Working Group, economist Gareth Morgan made an off-the-cuff remark that the solution to all of New Zealand's tax and welfare woes lay in abolishing the present welfare system and radically overhauling the tax system. He called this idea the big kahuna. The Big Kahuna takes as its base assumption that we don't, as a society, accept that huge differences in income are acceptable and that we therefore choose to redistribute wealth. While they are generally regarded as separate, the tax and welfare systems are fundamentally both methods of doing just that - redistributing income from those who have plenty to those who don't. In a nutshell, The Big Kahuna seeks to show that if the job of redistributing wealth and income is worth doing, it's worth doing properly, so that the resulting system is fair to all, rich and poor alike.


Compare
Ads Banner

One day, when he was contributing to the Tax and Welfare Working Group, economist Gareth Morgan made an off-the-cuff remark that the solution to all of New Zealand's tax and welfare woes lay in abolishing the present welfare system and radically overhauling the tax system. He called this idea the big kahuna. The Big Kahuna takes as its base assumption that we don't, as a One day, when he was contributing to the Tax and Welfare Working Group, economist Gareth Morgan made an off-the-cuff remark that the solution to all of New Zealand's tax and welfare woes lay in abolishing the present welfare system and radically overhauling the tax system. He called this idea the big kahuna. The Big Kahuna takes as its base assumption that we don't, as a society, accept that huge differences in income are acceptable and that we therefore choose to redistribute wealth. While they are generally regarded as separate, the tax and welfare systems are fundamentally both methods of doing just that - redistributing income from those who have plenty to those who don't. In a nutshell, The Big Kahuna seeks to show that if the job of redistributing wealth and income is worth doing, it's worth doing properly, so that the resulting system is fair to all, rich and poor alike.

32 review for The Big Kahuna: Turning Tax & Welfare In New Zealand On Its Head

  1. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    The ideas put forward in this book are excellent and even if you don't agree with all points it is excellent to see people thinking outside the square on tax and welfare. I don;t believe the curent target welfare system is fair on any party be it beneficiary or high income earner and the idea of a universal basic income seems like a good solution. For the most part it is an easy read except for a pretty heavy duty section on taxation. If you are in NZ and you are of voting age you should be The ideas put forward in this book are excellent and even if you don't agree with all points it is excellent to see people thinking outside the square on tax and welfare. I don;t believe the curent target welfare system is fair on any party be it beneficiary or high income earner and the idea of a universal basic income seems like a good solution. For the most part it is an easy read except for a pretty heavy duty section on taxation. If you are in NZ and you are of voting age you should be reading this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    An interesting read. Although I did not agree with many of the proposals in the book, it certainly gave me a lot to think about. Well done to the authors for trying to get the public more involved in discussion of these very complex issues.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nic Ayson

    I abandoned this book about half way through. While in principle it seemed it could be an interesting read the economic detail became all too much for me after a while.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dj Southlove

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sebastian

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rochelle Rees

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Smith

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alex Wb

  9. 5 out of 5

    George Claridge

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tom

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jessi Morgan

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amiria

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nova

  14. 5 out of 5

    Gareth

  15. 5 out of 5

    Linda

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tim

  17. 5 out of 5

    John

  18. 4 out of 5

    Simon

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jimmyt

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jan Logie

  21. 4 out of 5

    Donna Blaber

  22. 4 out of 5

    Terry Woods

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mama Orangutan

  24. 5 out of 5

    Emma Nichols

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tom Logan

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jim Benson

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ross

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  29. 5 out of 5

    Johannes

  30. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  31. 5 out of 5

    Sabian Meyrick

  32. 5 out of 5

    Peronne

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.