counter create hit Understanding Early Childhood Mental Health: A Practical Guide for Professionals - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Understanding Early Childhood Mental Health: A Practical Guide for Professionals

Availability: Ready to download

Integrating infant mental health services into early education programs leads to better child outcomes and stronger parent–child relationships—the big question is how to do it appropriately and effectively. Clear answers are in this accessible textbook, created to prepare early childhood professionals and programs to weave best practices in mental health into their every Integrating infant mental health services into early education programs leads to better child outcomes and stronger parent–child relationships—the big question is how to do it appropriately and effectively. Clear answers are in this accessible textbook, created to prepare early childhood professionals and programs to weave best practices in mental health into their everyday work. Ideal for preservice university courses, in-service professional development, and program administrators, this introductory text combines the authoritative guidance of more than a dozen respected mental health and early childhood experts. Professionals will get a primer on infant mental health, strengthening their knowledge of key issues such as screening and assessment, attachment, emotional dysregulation and aggression, risk and resilience, maternal depression, and children's exposure to trauma. Then they'll get practical, research-based guidance they can use to recognize indicators of mental health problems in very young children, including emotional dysregulation and behavioral and developmental changes promote parents' and caregivers' mental health through direct and indirect supports, including regular mental health screening, community partnerships with mental health providers, and parent education build on child and family strengths and mitigate risk factors such as poverty and violence strengthen parent–child relationships and interactions through play and effective caregiving routines maintain their own mental health, building positive relationships with co-workers and reducing the effects of compassion fatigue and secondary stress participate in reflective supervision to sharpen their ability to think critically and solve problems conduct sound program evaluation that includes the input of families, staff, and the surrounding culture and community work effectively with outside mental health consultants when child and family needs extend beyond the program's scope With this highly readable introduction to key mental health principles, the next generation of early childhood professionals will fully understand the latest research and best practice—so they can support optimal caregiver-child relationships, enhance professional collaboration, and strengthen child development.


Compare

Integrating infant mental health services into early education programs leads to better child outcomes and stronger parent–child relationships—the big question is how to do it appropriately and effectively. Clear answers are in this accessible textbook, created to prepare early childhood professionals and programs to weave best practices in mental health into their every Integrating infant mental health services into early education programs leads to better child outcomes and stronger parent–child relationships—the big question is how to do it appropriately and effectively. Clear answers are in this accessible textbook, created to prepare early childhood professionals and programs to weave best practices in mental health into their everyday work. Ideal for preservice university courses, in-service professional development, and program administrators, this introductory text combines the authoritative guidance of more than a dozen respected mental health and early childhood experts. Professionals will get a primer on infant mental health, strengthening their knowledge of key issues such as screening and assessment, attachment, emotional dysregulation and aggression, risk and resilience, maternal depression, and children's exposure to trauma. Then they'll get practical, research-based guidance they can use to recognize indicators of mental health problems in very young children, including emotional dysregulation and behavioral and developmental changes promote parents' and caregivers' mental health through direct and indirect supports, including regular mental health screening, community partnerships with mental health providers, and parent education build on child and family strengths and mitigate risk factors such as poverty and violence strengthen parent–child relationships and interactions through play and effective caregiving routines maintain their own mental health, building positive relationships with co-workers and reducing the effects of compassion fatigue and secondary stress participate in reflective supervision to sharpen their ability to think critically and solve problems conduct sound program evaluation that includes the input of families, staff, and the surrounding culture and community work effectively with outside mental health consultants when child and family needs extend beyond the program's scope With this highly readable introduction to key mental health principles, the next generation of early childhood professionals will fully understand the latest research and best practice—so they can support optimal caregiver-child relationships, enhance professional collaboration, and strengthen child development.

30 review for Understanding Early Childhood Mental Health: A Practical Guide for Professionals

  1. 4 out of 5

    Randie D. Camp, M.S.

    I read three chapters that focused on Childhood Trauma and Attachment. It is very informative and focuses on the application of research and theories but it reads like a textbook, not very engaging.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

  4. 5 out of 5

    Robin Blue

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alba Kamal

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Carmichael

  7. 4 out of 5

    Annie

  8. 4 out of 5

    Keshia Mayrhofer

  9. 5 out of 5

    Heather

  10. 5 out of 5

    Beth Negley

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lizzy

  12. 5 out of 5

    Christine Walsh

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Sacchetti

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa Schutte

  15. 5 out of 5

    Arwa

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Audino

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mary

  18. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Wallace

  19. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Davenport

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  21. 4 out of 5

    Katrina

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dani

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  24. 5 out of 5

    Liilamaya Galvis

  25. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  26. 4 out of 5

    Yannibean

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elaine Larson

  28. 5 out of 5

    Pinar

  29. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

  30. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Singer

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.