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Charter Schools and the Corporate Makeover of Public Education: What's at Stake?

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This book will reset the discourse on charter schooling by systematically exploring the gap between the promise and the performance of charter schools. The authors do not defend the public school system, which for decades has failed primarily poor children of color. Instead, they use empirical evidence to determine whether charter schooling offers an authentic alternative This book will reset the discourse on charter schooling by systematically exploring the gap between the promise and the performance of charter schools. The authors do not defend the public school system, which for decades has failed primarily poor children of color. Instead, they use empirical evidence to determine whether charter schooling offers an authentic alternative for these children. In concise chapters, they address a series of important questions related to the recent ascent of charter schools and the radical restructuring of public education. This essential introduction includes a detailed history of the charter movement, an analysis of the politics and economics driving the movement, documentation of actual student outcomes, and alternative images of transforming public education to serve all children. Book Features: An overview of the key issues surrounding the charter school movement. A reframing of the recent discourse on public school reform A comprehensive comparison examining the promises of charter schooling against the empirical evidence. An examination of how charter schools impact communities of color and larger public school systems in poor urban areas. An exploration of the relationships among the rapid ascendance of charter reform, economic decline, and fiscal austerity.


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This book will reset the discourse on charter schooling by systematically exploring the gap between the promise and the performance of charter schools. The authors do not defend the public school system, which for decades has failed primarily poor children of color. Instead, they use empirical evidence to determine whether charter schooling offers an authentic alternative This book will reset the discourse on charter schooling by systematically exploring the gap between the promise and the performance of charter schools. The authors do not defend the public school system, which for decades has failed primarily poor children of color. Instead, they use empirical evidence to determine whether charter schooling offers an authentic alternative for these children. In concise chapters, they address a series of important questions related to the recent ascent of charter schools and the radical restructuring of public education. This essential introduction includes a detailed history of the charter movement, an analysis of the politics and economics driving the movement, documentation of actual student outcomes, and alternative images of transforming public education to serve all children. Book Features: An overview of the key issues surrounding the charter school movement. A reframing of the recent discourse on public school reform A comprehensive comparison examining the promises of charter schooling against the empirical evidence. An examination of how charter schools impact communities of color and larger public school systems in poor urban areas. An exploration of the relationships among the rapid ascendance of charter reform, economic decline, and fiscal austerity.

52 review for Charter Schools and the Corporate Makeover of Public Education: What's at Stake?

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gregg

    One of those tomes that makes you grit your teeth, the writers sift through the damning evidence of corporations' endorsement of charter schools, at the expense of the public system and at odds with empirical, convincing evidence. Little new here for anyone closely following the debate; anyone not following it isn't likely to pick up and read 130 pages of academic prose on the subject, which makes one grit the teeth even harder. The authors are careful to point out that charters can be incredibl One of those tomes that makes you grit your teeth, the writers sift through the damning evidence of corporations' endorsement of charter schools, at the expense of the public system and at odds with empirical, convincing evidence. Little new here for anyone closely following the debate; anyone not following it isn't likely to pick up and read 130 pages of academic prose on the subject, which makes one grit the teeth even harder. The authors are careful to point out that charters can be incredible tools for innovation and have done wonders for students--the problem is, charters like this are the exception, not the rule (17% of them, according to the Stanford CREDO study, but that's old news). The book ends with a call to action. It advocates organization, and greater outreach to the community and parents by unions. I second that. Be in my basement for the first teach-in this weekend. There'll be beer to drink. And academic studies to read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Britta

    Charter Schools and the Corporate Makeover of Public Education was an enlightening read for me; it validated and supported many of my own concerns about the charter school movement that has been overtaking America, particularly in cities, and helped me to understand my own concerns more fully. Charter schools aren't inherently terrible (though there are and have been some charter schools that are actually terrible), but investing in charter schools instead of public school districts is a starry- Charter Schools and the Corporate Makeover of Public Education was an enlightening read for me; it validated and supported many of my own concerns about the charter school movement that has been overtaking America, particularly in cities, and helped me to understand my own concerns more fully. Charter schools aren't inherently terrible (though there are and have been some charter schools that are actually terrible), but investing in charter schools instead of public school districts is a starry-eyed and short-sighted reform move. Public education reform in America should start by investing in American public schools and districts. Stating that our public schools are failing and believing that brand new charter schools and the concept of school choice will fix anything is a simplistic, quick fix to a complex, complicated public education system. Fabricant and Fine show how the expansion of charter schools has lead to not just higher in-school student segregation by race, but also an incredible lack of resources for the at-risk students who need the most help (as these students are often pushed out of the many charter schools with stringent behavior expectations, and are further left in the dust if their neighborhood public school closed down due to poor performance). I currently work at a charter, and admire all the work my charter school is doing to continuously become a better place for teachers to come work and for students to come learn. Yet, I have, for a long time now, intuitively thought that charter's aren't the best answer. Fabricant and Fine put into words so much of what I've come to believe about charter school education. We can't rely on these constantly popping up charter schools to reform American education. While individual charter schools are undoubtedly doing good work to help students succeed, the charter sector is, across the board, inconsistent and unreliable. Expecting charters to single handedly transform American education is a disservice to American children and the future of this country.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    I started this book with an opinion on the charter school movement, and it was confirmed. Charter schools have been lauded as the saving grace for impoverished urban and suburban areas. However, they have had mixed results, and there is no conclusive evidence that charter schools are better than public schools. In fact, according to Fabricant and Fine charter schools on average do worse than public schools in testing. Charter schools also expel high need students and those with disabilities.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    371.05097 F126 2012

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    Erendira

    1 copy being processed for Main. 5/15/12

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