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Dave Ramsey knows what it's like to have it all. By age twenty-six, he had established a four-million-dollar real estate portfolio, only to lose it by age thirty. He has since rebuilt his financial life and, through his workshops and his New York Times business bestsellers Financial Peace and More than Enough, he has helped hundreds of thousands of people to understand the Dave Ramsey knows what it's like to have it all. By age twenty-six, he had established a four-million-dollar real estate portfolio, only to lose it by age thirty. He has since rebuilt his financial life and, through his workshops and his New York Times business bestsellers Financial Peace and More than Enough, he has helped hundreds of thousands of people to understand the forces behind their financial distress and how to set things right-financially, emotionally, and spiritually.In this new edition of Financial Peace, Ramsey has updated his tactics and philosophy to show even more readers: how to get out of debt and stay out the KISS rule of investing—"Keep It Simple, Stupid" how to use the principle of contentment to guide financial decision making how the flow of money can revolutionize relationships With practical and easy to follow methods and personal anecdotes, Financial Peace is the road map to personal control, financial security, a new, vital family dynamic, and lifetime peace.


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Dave Ramsey knows what it's like to have it all. By age twenty-six, he had established a four-million-dollar real estate portfolio, only to lose it by age thirty. He has since rebuilt his financial life and, through his workshops and his New York Times business bestsellers Financial Peace and More than Enough, he has helped hundreds of thousands of people to understand the Dave Ramsey knows what it's like to have it all. By age twenty-six, he had established a four-million-dollar real estate portfolio, only to lose it by age thirty. He has since rebuilt his financial life and, through his workshops and his New York Times business bestsellers Financial Peace and More than Enough, he has helped hundreds of thousands of people to understand the forces behind their financial distress and how to set things right-financially, emotionally, and spiritually.In this new edition of Financial Peace, Ramsey has updated his tactics and philosophy to show even more readers: how to get out of debt and stay out the KISS rule of investing—"Keep It Simple, Stupid" how to use the principle of contentment to guide financial decision making how the flow of money can revolutionize relationships With practical and easy to follow methods and personal anecdotes, Financial Peace is the road map to personal control, financial security, a new, vital family dynamic, and lifetime peace.

30 review for Financial Peace Revisited

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    Since I've been in the middle of a lot of money trouble, a friend of mine lent me this book as well as a little cash to make it through my next set of bills. I figured I owed him enough to at least read the book. I can't tell you how annoying it was to read this thing, which is clearly just a collection of transcribed parts of Ramsey's seminars and radio shows from the 1990s. So he gives us some moderately sound financial advice: Get out of debt, or better yet, don't go into it. Save where you ca Since I've been in the middle of a lot of money trouble, a friend of mine lent me this book as well as a little cash to make it through my next set of bills. I figured I owed him enough to at least read the book. I can't tell you how annoying it was to read this thing, which is clearly just a collection of transcribed parts of Ramsey's seminars and radio shows from the 1990s. So he gives us some moderately sound financial advice: Get out of debt, or better yet, don't go into it. Save where you can. Invest in mutual funds once you've saved. Beyond those few points, this guy is both irrelevant and dangerously stereotypical. The book doesn't even mention the Internet or housing boom/busts or financial problems of the current economy. He talks about looking for deals as if we've never heard of craigslist (and then proceeds to act like it doesn't exist). I would be okay with this, as the book seems to have been written about 20 years ago, but this is the updated, revisited edition. This man has had time to update things. He blathers about how everyone can save and stay out of debt, and yet makes the assumption that everyone is going to find work all the time that will pay at least $30,000 a year, which he classifies as really low-end income. I got news for you, Dave. I (barely) made it on about half that last year, and I am working three jobs. I have more than a half-dozen friends who are in similar situations. He has the nerve to question the maturity of 20-somethings who are still living with their parents or with friends, because they just "aren't working hard enough," and classifies it as a problem with my generation. A great deal of his suggestions will only work if you don't have to continue to go into debt to survive or are even just cutting it close. Saving money and paying toward debt only ever works when something can be cut somewhere to save. And the part that made even these socioeconomic gaffs is his ridiculous stereotypical worldview in which everyone is going to get married. The men are going to go and earn money. The women could go out and work, but in some situations should just stay home and take care of kids. They are going to buy a house and have 2.5 kids. He is going to want a car and a boat and she is going to want a kitchen set. He jokes that when he sells houses, he sells women the kitchen and men the basement. You know what, Dave? I'm renting where I am because I like my kitchen and basement. Every chapter is clearly aimed at men, and techniques are sold in the same way. Each chapter is followed by a short, couple-paragraph summary from Ramsey's wife Sharon, who breaks down the ideas for the ladies. In one pretty straightforward chapter about investing, Sharon's section explicitly tells women to ask their husbands to explain it to them. I was sputtering at some of the tripe I read. The sidelong jokes about "Social Insecurity" probably make better seminar quip fodder, and they certainly didn't help me through this book. Except for one or two good points, this was absolute drivel, and I didn't even understand some of it. Maybe I should ask my husband to explain it to me.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Madison

    This book is incredibly outdated (I read a 2003 edition in 2019 so it is possible my library did not have a newer edition). The examples used and the audience he is speaking to have not been updated and felt out of sync. Also, multiple times throughout the book there would be a sentence or phrase that was very poorly phrased and I kept asking myself how this got past the editor. For example at the beginning of Chapter Twenty One: Baby Steps he states "The end of our large day-long seminars leave This book is incredibly outdated (I read a 2003 edition in 2019 so it is possible my library did not have a newer edition). The examples used and the audience he is speaking to have not been updated and felt out of sync. Also, multiple times throughout the book there would be a sentence or phrase that was very poorly phrased and I kept asking myself how this got past the editor. For example at the beginning of Chapter Twenty One: Baby Steps he states "The end of our large day-long seminars leaves people feeling like this book, a bit overwhelmed." Is he trying to say the book is overwhelmed? Or that people leaving a long seminar are similar to people reading this book, which is still not a good thing to say about your writing. It was distracting. The Peace Puppies at the end of most chapters should have been in a list at the end with the newest puppies at the end of each chapter. It would have saved so many pages. We also could have done without Thoughts from Sharon at the end of each chapter as they were fluff that usually was loosely related to the chapter. I did however like that we were given templates or "work sheets" at the end of the book to guide the reader and that it was referenced occasionally throughout the book but not overly so. I also liked the reference notes at the end of the book which I did use to look up some articles the author referenced. This is a very Christian view heavy book which is fine as most Christians think they should talk about their faith and let others know about it. But at times it was sexist and heteronormative. Again this may partially be due to how old the version I was reading is. The majority of the book is focused on talking about the husband and the wife and while we did get a chapter devoted to different types of singles it felt very narrow minded. Dave Ramsey was one of the first names I came upon when starting to learn about money on my own. I watched his radio show on Youtube and found many of his teachings online. While I like his no nonsense "suck it up and change what you are doing" attitude that motivates many people, I do not necessarily agree with everything he says. Maybe I was spoiled by reading Broke Millennial by Erin Lowery a few weeks before picking up this book, but I do not think I will be reading another book by Dave Ramsey as I don't want to waste my time or be disappointed again. Overall this book is outdated, has poor editing, and has several components that should just be cut. You may want to flip to the end and look at the templates in the very back if you happen upon this book, but each of those you could find on Google. I suppose the only good thing about using the ones at the back of this book is that they come with detailed instructions and you won't waste time flipping through all of the options online.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Timothy S.

    I loved every part of it. I like how Dave covered everything from getting out of debt, to staying out of debt, to money for singles, married, divorced, etc., to building wealth. My favorite things about this book were how Dave explained The power of compound interest and mutual funds when they're working for you. I know I'll be putting large amounts of money into savings and mutual funds. I also know I will be very tight on enjoyment spending during college so I don't need to get student loans. I loved every part of it. I like how Dave covered everything from getting out of debt, to staying out of debt, to money for singles, married, divorced, etc., to building wealth. My favorite things about this book were how Dave explained The power of compound interest and mutual funds when they're working for you. I know I'll be putting large amounts of money into savings and mutual funds. I also know I will be very tight on enjoyment spending during college so I don't need to get student loans. This is one of the top ten books I would recommend every teen read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Great read! Lots of tips and tricks about handling money. Definitely a good follow up to Total money makeover.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    Common sense and practical financial information and advice that most people already know , but don't always follow. The back of the book contains a myriad of worksheets to help you after you read. Dave's wife, Sharon, comments at the end of every chapter, which wasn't very informative or interesting. Otherwise, a decent primer for the average Joe to refresh his financial saavy or learn it new.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    While some info in this is slightly dated the advice remains relevant. While we have slowly and admittedly inconsistently practiced the advice offered, already it has helped me be aware of money like never before. Definitely something or everyone in this book, from the struggling millennial to the baby boomer unable to retire. Financial Peace offers everything in the title and more.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Craig a.k.a Meatstack

    Dave Ramsey has taken a tested and true set of principles, threw some scripture quotes in, and called it "Financial Peace." And that's fine, because if it helps to get people to get their cash flow under control, more power to him. As a representative of the genre this book belongs to, it really is not bad. Usually in books of this nature the author will attempt to establish his credibility by telling you, in 1/2 the book, his story. (For extreme examples of this, please see the "4 hour" series b Dave Ramsey has taken a tested and true set of principles, threw some scripture quotes in, and called it "Financial Peace." And that's fine, because if it helps to get people to get their cash flow under control, more power to him. As a representative of the genre this book belongs to, it really is not bad. Usually in books of this nature the author will attempt to establish his credibility by telling you, in 1/2 the book, his story. (For extreme examples of this, please see the "4 hour" series by Tim Farris) But Mr. Ramsey does not dwell longer than what is needed. Here's my story, now on to the meat. But this meat does come with a big stack of fluff. First off, the "Thoughts from Sharon" (his wife) is pointless, and in some cases demeaning toward women. Maybe because I've married and have lived with a very strong woman for 12 years, I was embarrassed by some of what she said. "We women love to shop, don't we?!" And the "Peace puppies" is just a list of his take-aways from each chapter, but the list continues to contain all the previous notes, so by the end, this list takes up 3 pages. In the end though - none of that matters. What matters is that the author puts in front of the reader a clear plan and reasons on how his system works. He's done that. Its up to the reader to decide if he/she chooses to follow it, and how devoted to the system that person will be. And that is the true rating of this kind of book. Not whatever star count I place in this review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Indy Hart

    "I get it. Thanks." That was my overall feeling while reading Financial Peace Revisited. This book is a near copy of the other books pushed out by Dave Ramsey. His book "Total Money Makeover" had been suggested to me and then read and reviewed before. Financial Peace Revisited had a few extra insights in it that I enjoyed, but I probably wouldn't have done anything more than flipped through it were it not for my reading group. I might reference his categorical generalizations of the financial decis "I get it. Thanks." That was my overall feeling while reading Financial Peace Revisited. This book is a near copy of the other books pushed out by Dave Ramsey. His book "Total Money Makeover" had been suggested to me and then read and reviewed before. Financial Peace Revisited had a few extra insights in it that I enjoyed, but I probably wouldn't have done anything more than flipped through it were it not for my reading group. I might reference his categorical generalizations of the financial decisions people tend to make throughout life, simply as a way to remind myself what to be aware of. Other than that, my overall advice regarding this advice-giving book: if you've read one of his books you've read them all. Take a look at the table of contents, see if there's anything that catches your eye, skim it, and then put it back on the shelf. Who knows, maybe the simple act of not buying the book will empower you with a little extra "financial peace".

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jermaine Gayle

    Found the author's podcast recently during one of my long trips on the road. After listening I was determined to get a hold of this book. Now that I've read it, I do see the need for proper management of what God has given to us in the form of money. Money is a gift and the principles outlined here are a good guide to managing your finances. This is a must have if you are; trying to stay out of debt, trying to build wealth, and ultimately trying to serve God with what He has allowed you to have.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Suzie

    I read this book in 2005 while attending "Financial Peace University" at my church. The combination helped me change the direction of my financial life, motivated me to pay off all my debts, helped me become a much better saver, and equipped me with the knowledge to help several of my friends become debt-free too! I highly recommend this book and the FPU course to anyone that does not have a financial plan for their life, and I am more than willing to share what I have learned and help you get t I read this book in 2005 while attending "Financial Peace University" at my church. The combination helped me change the direction of my financial life, motivated me to pay off all my debts, helped me become a much better saver, and equipped me with the knowledge to help several of my friends become debt-free too! I highly recommend this book and the FPU course to anyone that does not have a financial plan for their life, and I am more than willing to share what I have learned and help you get to FREEEEEDOM too. : )

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lorelei

    I assume that there is a need for a book such as this - in fact I'm sure of it, given how many copies have been sold. But I am not the target audience. There is nothing here that is new to me, and I found it tedious, repetitive and unhelpful. I don't like being this harsh, but it is the truth.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Chad Simons

    I read a Ramsey book a few years ago, and it was really good financial advice, so I decided to give this one a listen, to refresh my mind on some of his principles. He has great ideas, some are very extreme though. His money saving stuff is good advice for all of us, but when he says to sale the car and pay off the loan and then buy a junker that you do not have to have payments for, I have a hard time. Junkers, in my experience, have been money pits for me. Basically, I listened to his book and I read a Ramsey book a few years ago, and it was really good financial advice, so I decided to give this one a listen, to refresh my mind on some of his principles. He has great ideas, some are very extreme though. His money saving stuff is good advice for all of us, but when he says to sale the car and pay off the loan and then buy a junker that you do not have to have payments for, I have a hard time. Junkers, in my experience, have been money pits for me. Basically, I listened to his book and I have piecemealed some of his principles that will work best for me. With his pointers, those who struggle with money should be able to get a handle on it. If you are like me and feel like you are good with money, you can still pick up some good practices from this and his other books!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Omgema Dut

    It was a quick and easy read. I liked that he kept the concepts simple and instructions are easy to follow, lots of great advices for novices like myself.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Maddy B

    I had to read this for school but I really enjoyed it. It's definitely a book that has helped me understand money a little better and I HIGHLY recommend that every person read it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Non-fiction. Review of the money practices laid forth in the Total Money Makeover, which I read first. How to rid yourself of debt. Solid financial advice. Debt snowball. Budgeting.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Carol Blakeman

    Not a lot I hadn't heard before, but a good review and written in a way that is engaging with good real-life examples.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Great information with scriptures. Definitely a reread for me..

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rebeca Amich

    Such great practical advice on how to handle my finance. I felt stuck after debt I accumulated. This reassured me I have a way out that will take time and discipline but that it’s something that’s doable

  19. 4 out of 5

    Camryn Hays

    More detailed than money makeover I have already read the Money Makeover. While this book was informative in a different way I feel the differences were covered in only a few chapters. I'm glad to have read them both, but I probably won't do so again. The chapter I appreciated here was about negotiation and mutual funds. Those were things not discussed in the other text.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jayde Schwerin

    Dave Ramsey is truly a brilliant author. Another excellent book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Angela Powell

    Good, but very similar to Total Money Makeover.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    I really do love this program..I need to figure out a way to manage this and do all of the financial things that are really necessary when we all die.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Logan Hughes

    This is one of the classic layman personal finance manuals, focusing on getting out of debt, reducing spending, saving for a rainy day, and building a retirement nest egg. Ramsey's advice is for the most part solid, although he can be extreme with his anti-debt stance (he even wants you to pay off your mortgage ASAP). His investment advice is iffier and betrays some basic but common misunderstandings of the way the stock market works, but is mostly harmless. I would be comfortable recommending t This is one of the classic layman personal finance manuals, focusing on getting out of debt, reducing spending, saving for a rainy day, and building a retirement nest egg. Ramsey's advice is for the most part solid, although he can be extreme with his anti-debt stance (he even wants you to pay off your mortgage ASAP). His investment advice is iffier and betrays some basic but common misunderstandings of the way the stock market works, but is mostly harmless. I would be comfortable recommending this book to someone who might find it helpful: a decent, salt-of-the-earth, financially struggling, Christian conservative. What Ramsey gets especially right is the attitude. He gets you ANGRY at debt. Angry at waste. Angry at anyone who wants to make a sucker out of you. This is what gets people going. Even if his advice isn't the most 100% mathematically correct, it's much more likely to light a fire under a reader's butt and get them to actually SAVE and CHANGE than a dry, mathematical manual would. Dave Ramsey is an interesting character. He has helped many, many people get out of debt and get control of their finances. I have spoken to people who find him incredibly inspirational. I have no doubt that he has improved a lot of lives. His advice is simple and common-sense; for the most part, I do agree with him, which is surprising considering that I'm normally completely alienated within two sentences out of the mouth of a fundamentalist Christian Republican. I listened to his radio show for awhile, and I can see how it's motivational to hear people give their "debt free scream" and to hear him gently talk some freaking out single mom through her situation. He actually gets into politics fairly rarely, but I had to stop listening because it's often enough that it makes me feel upset and ill. The book is fairly apolitical; it does bring in the Christian stuff a little more than the show usually does. He quotes scripture a few times, but it's actually pretty okay. I actually found the relationship advice more bothersome because it assumed a heteronormative, Men are from Mars paradigm, but at the same time, if you can get past that, it is pretty good advice. Ramsey suggests ways to get both members of a couple involved in finances and pulling on the same side. What does skeeve me out sometimes is the feeling that Ramsey is trying to get you to buy a product. He has this vast empire built out of his classes, books, programs, and from working with a network of approved vendors--anyone from investment brokers to insurance salespeople to home inspectors. I don't believe there's anything necessarily wrong with making money off of your skill and your passion, and he doesn't need to do his counseling for free to do good, I do have to wonder if some of his advice is driven by a profit motive--if he plays down the danger of high expense ratios because he gets a cut from his approved brokers, for example. Actually, Dave Ramsey is a lot of like Suze Orman. Both give mostly good advice that is clear, easy to follow, motivational, sub-optimal but probably mostly harmless when it comes to the stock market, and potentially infused with creepy conflicts of interest. But Suze has gays on her show and Dave doesn't, so I listen to Suze.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Lubin

    I got introduced to Dave Ramsey with "The Total Money Makeover" audiobook and I thought it was fantastic. It left me wanting more and I immediately started Financial Peace. Financial peace is a good book, it has solid financial advice and if someone can incorporate the principals in their life then they will be better off. Although the principals are simple and straightforward they are hard to consistently practice... at least they are for me. Unfortunately for me, this book is not nearly as goo I got introduced to Dave Ramsey with "The Total Money Makeover" audiobook and I thought it was fantastic. It left me wanting more and I immediately started Financial Peace. Financial peace is a good book, it has solid financial advice and if someone can incorporate the principals in their life then they will be better off. Although the principals are simple and straightforward they are hard to consistently practice... at least they are for me. Unfortunately for me, this book is not nearly as good as "The Total Money Makeover" Dave Ramsey narrates TMM and he crushes it. He skips a lot of extra detail and delivers the main points succinctly and well. In Financial Peace the narrator does a bad Dave Ramsey impression and there is a lot of extra fluff and it's a slog to get through. I really like Dave Ramsey and will continue to consume his content but I'm very glad I don't have to read Financial Peace anymore.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ana

    Overall this was okay, but you can really tell it was written in the '90s (Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus, urgh!), but the principles are sound. But I recommend either listening to the podcast or just watching the Financial Peace course online since that's more 21-century friendly. Overall this was okay, but you can really tell it was written in the '90s (Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus, urgh!), but the principles are sound. But I recommend either listening to the podcast or just watching the Financial Peace course online since that's more 21-century friendly.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Leisha Wharfield

    I would like to list here the "baby steps" toward financial peace listed in chapter 21, because that's really all anyone needs to read of this book to get started, but I'm afraid that would violate Mr. Ramsey's copyright, and I won't do that to anyone, especially Mr. Ramsey and his wife, who I respect. Yes, the entire program is founded on Christian belief, which includes tithing to one's church. If you're a pagan like me, you may choose to tithe to charities that provide food, clothing, shelter I would like to list here the "baby steps" toward financial peace listed in chapter 21, because that's really all anyone needs to read of this book to get started, but I'm afraid that would violate Mr. Ramsey's copyright, and I won't do that to anyone, especially Mr. Ramsey and his wife, who I respect. Yes, the entire program is founded on Christian belief, which includes tithing to one's church. If you're a pagan like me, you may choose to tithe to charities that provide food, clothing, shelter, education, and health care to those more or less rich than you, to the panhandler on your street, some Kickstarter, Giveforward, or impoverished friend or relative you know is in need. Tithing is a good idea and religious specifics don't matter. Regarding the book's sexism, widely castigated on GoodReads: it's obvious to everyone, so what can I say? I don't want to ask, "What do you expect from someone who worships a male god whose first two human villains -- Lilith and Eve -- are women, and whose worshipers invented original sin to keep us down?" because obviously we all know Christians who aren't sexist pigs. The Christian bias of Mr. and Mrs. Ramsey doesn't bother me. I wouldn't not read a book from any religious point of view simply because it's faith-based. I was brought up Lutheran, I'm familiar with scripture, and I gained a lot of wisdom via the vehicle of my church and understand it has no monopoly on the truth. Similarly, we must call out sexism when it arises, but that does not negate whatever positive lesson may arise from the work. For the majority of U.S. consumers who buy a lot of crap we don't need and can't afford, the advice in this book may be tough to take, and that's a good thing. Ramsey's right: we should live within our means, erase debt, not worship stuff, and generally put money in its place and focus on living a compassionate life in which we take better care of ourselves and each other.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    If someone is in dire straits financially, this book is invaluable for tips, strategy and plain common sense for savings and dumping debt. His baby steps for financial peace are applicable to anyone in any circumstance, especially the emergency fund in a money market account and the debt snowball. However, I do believe that he is legalistic in some of the minute details of those steps. For someone who has never paid a penny of credit card interest in 12 years, but who enjoys free money from the If someone is in dire straits financially, this book is invaluable for tips, strategy and plain common sense for savings and dumping debt. His baby steps for financial peace are applicable to anyone in any circumstance, especially the emergency fund in a money market account and the debt snowball. However, I do believe that he is legalistic in some of the minute details of those steps. For someone who has never paid a penny of credit card interest in 12 years, but who enjoys free money from the credit card company every year, then cutting up my credit cards makes no financial sense. I curbed my spending without paying cash for everything, just by being more conscious and working a budget (which he also teaches very well). However, most people do in fact spend more when using credit cards, so this tip is essential for them. It's just not a one-size-fits-all plan. And Dave Ramsey is not a licensed financial planner, so you have to take his investment advice with a grain of salt, depending on your personal circumstances and goals (e.g., he doesn't explain the full benefits of whole life, and prefers term life insurance). I would review his preferences with someone you trust, who is successful financially. And I also enjoy his show on Fox Business Network. Check it out.

  28. 5 out of 5

    David

    Dave Ramsey knows what it's like to have it all. By age twenty-six, he had established a four-million-dollar real estate portfolio, only to lose it by age thirty. He has since rebuilt his financial life and, through his workshops and his New York Times business bestsellers Financial Peace and More than Enough, he has helped hundreds of thousands of people to understand the forces behind their financial distress and how to set things right-financially, emotionally, and spiritually.In this new edi Dave Ramsey knows what it's like to have it all. By age twenty-six, he had established a four-million-dollar real estate portfolio, only to lose it by age thirty. He has since rebuilt his financial life and, through his workshops and his New York Times business bestsellers Financial Peace and More than Enough, he has helped hundreds of thousands of people to understand the forces behind their financial distress and how to set things right-financially, emotionally, and spiritually.In this new edition of Financial Peace, Ramsey has updated his tactics and philosophy to show even more readers: how to get out of debt and stay out the KISS rule of investing—"Keep It Simple, Stupid" how to use the principle of contentment to guide financial decision making how the flow of money can revolutionize relationships With practical and easy to follow methods and personal anecdotes, Financial Peace is the road map to personal control, financial security, a new, vital family dynamic, and lifetime peace.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Talia

    About a decade ago, my dad went to the Financial Peace classes and learned about Dave Ramsey's ideas about money. He talked about it and we as a family began to listen to the idea that things could be done differently. Fast forward, and here I am reading this book. I've listened to a lot of Dave Ramsey's radio show and YouTube videos on top of hearing what others had to say about going debt-free and being able to still live. Because of all this background, and seeing my family go through stupid About a decade ago, my dad went to the Financial Peace classes and learned about Dave Ramsey's ideas about money. He talked about it and we as a family began to listen to the idea that things could be done differently. Fast forward, and here I am reading this book. I've listened to a lot of Dave Ramsey's radio show and YouTube videos on top of hearing what others had to say about going debt-free and being able to still live. Because of all this background, and seeing my family go through stupid nonsense over credit, I'm very interested in the debt-free lifestyle and that's why I wanted to read this book and dig a little deeper. Some of the questions that I either hear on Dave's radio show or see in YouTube comments are addressed in this book. For example: What if I'm self-employed or don't have a way to predict my income each month? What about single parents? If you want to know more about Dave's whole system and answers to these questions, get this book. I've been paying attention to this for a long time and didn't know the answers to some of these questions either. This book also mentions finding what you're great at so you don't have to work a crappy job your whole life. This is one area that I think is so important for people, if they can, to strive towards. Sometimes you don't get the opportunity to have a job you love for a few years or maybe it's just not plausible yet, but it makes your job feel so much more like an enjoyable process instead of a waste of life. Dave also brought up some good points about people wanting to reach their parents' levels of wealth so quickly after getting married, but instead acquiring so much debt. Many of us forget that our parents worked a long time to get what they have, and many if us just think we'd like to have it now instead. Some reviewers also mentioned that Dave was being sexist towards women. However, in every area so far into the book where Dave has discussed the differences between male and female, have been quoted from other sources. I don't agree with a lot of these "blanket statements," but I don't necessarily think they're sexist. Men and women are different but we as a society think its bogus to dare point it out because of "sexism." It's fine that we're all different! What comes across as sexist to me personally is acting like other people are stupid or insignificant because of their chromosomes. That's sexist. None of this comes across as that to me as I'm reading this book. Further into the book, Dave gives a few generalized ideas for men communicating with women and women communicating with men. These are generalized and may tick off some people because "everyone's not like that," and I agree. The point is to get your wheels turning on how to get a spouse on board with living a better life financially. You don't need to do everything Dave says to the letter. Dave also mentions that it's sexist to leave the woman in the relationship out of financial matters "because she's a woman" just as it's sexist to leave it all with the woman to deal with because she's "modern" or whatever. It's a joint effort. One thing people don't seem to think about is having Blow Money. Dave says you're gonna do it anyways, so you might as well plan for it. I think that's a great idea, that way if doesn't always feel like you're working for free if you're just saving, saving, saving. He also dives into Mutual Funds, ESAs, etc. but he is not overly descriptive with these and I still don't totally understand all of it as it's new to me. However, these can be learned about from other sources and this book is not totally about mutual funds, etc. It's more about getting your money as a whole under control. Dave has a section dedicated to the Baby Steps, which I appreciated because it went deep into what each step should look like. Personally, I hesitate to jump on board with all the steps (anything that involves a bank as we know that they do not keep your cash on hand and this was a big problem during the Depression), however, I'm not quite willing to say it's totally wrong either. I think spreading your wealth to non-banking areas like land, seeds, gold, etc. should be looked at too. If we look back in history, in Germany, money was so worthless that it was cheaper to use it for the fireplace than to use it to buy anything. So that is why I hesitate in putting all the eggs in one basket. Towards the end of the book, there are forms to fill out to help you get your finances together. These forms include: • Healthy Financial Plan -- this covers Insurance, Giving, Teaching Your Children (about money management), Emergency Funding, Will/Estate Plan, etc. and the dates you want to have these things taken care of. • Consumer Equity sheet -- this covers Real Estate you own, Cars, Accounts, Stocks and Bonds, Jewelry, Debts, etc. • Income Sources • Lump Sum Payment Planning -- similar to Sinking Funds • Monthly Cash Flow Plan forms • Irregular Income Planning • Breakdown of Savings Among others. Do I think this is the end-all, be-all? Not necessarily. But it's a great financial resource to have. It's kind of like the beginner, basic book for getting your feet wet. I like how it has a simple plan to get you going. I also recommend checking out the Dave Ramsey Show on YouTube and Rachel Cruz's (his daughter) channel as well. Many times, they'll talk about different scenarios and problems that you and I might be dealing with as far as finances. Their channels are more up-to-date than this book, which was published in 2003 and talked about using checks at the grocery store -- we all know that isn't really happening anymore! A great resource and very helpful for beginning a money-management journey. 4 stars.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jared Kessler

    There are few books that are as straight and to the point about money, and getting out of debt as this one. I read A LOT of books on how to get out of debt, but honestly, this is the only one that worked. More importantly, Dave Ramsey has the personal experience in applying what he teaches, and although there aren't any "smoke and mirrors," if you do what he says, I think you will agree that this is by far the best book on building wealth, paying off debts AND living on a cash only system. From There are few books that are as straight and to the point about money, and getting out of debt as this one. I read A LOT of books on how to get out of debt, but honestly, this is the only one that worked. More importantly, Dave Ramsey has the personal experience in applying what he teaches, and although there aren't any "smoke and mirrors," if you do what he says, I think you will agree that this is by far the best book on building wealth, paying off debts AND living on a cash only system. From this, I had personally paid off close to $20,000 in credit card debt with a zero balance on all cards (which I cut up a few years ago). I honest don't know any other book to recommend on building TRUE wealth, other than his. Like Dave says, "The quickest way to get rich quick is to NOT get rich quick."

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