counter create hit Three Women - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Three Women

Availability: Ready to download

Suzanne Blume has known success and disappointment in equal measure. A respected lawyer who survived two marriages and put two children through college, she now faces the disquieting prospect of her wayward older daughter moving back home. But more troubling still is the news that her mother, a woman of legendary independence who has never truly accepted her daughter nor a Suzanne Blume has known success and disappointment in equal measure. A respected lawyer who survived two marriages and put two children through college, she now faces the disquieting prospect of her wayward older daughter moving back home. But more troubling still is the news that her mother, a woman of legendary independence who has never truly accepted her daughter nor approved of her choices, has been felled by age and illness. And, for the first time in her life, she needs Suzanne's help. Intertwining the lives of three generations of contemporary women, master storyteller Marge Piercy plunges into the deepest, most elemental basics of life -- love, aging, illness, and death -- and emerges with a brave, compassionate exploration of the volatile ground between mothers and daughters.


Compare
Ads Banner

Suzanne Blume has known success and disappointment in equal measure. A respected lawyer who survived two marriages and put two children through college, she now faces the disquieting prospect of her wayward older daughter moving back home. But more troubling still is the news that her mother, a woman of legendary independence who has never truly accepted her daughter nor a Suzanne Blume has known success and disappointment in equal measure. A respected lawyer who survived two marriages and put two children through college, she now faces the disquieting prospect of her wayward older daughter moving back home. But more troubling still is the news that her mother, a woman of legendary independence who has never truly accepted her daughter nor approved of her choices, has been felled by age and illness. And, for the first time in her life, she needs Suzanne's help. Intertwining the lives of three generations of contemporary women, master storyteller Marge Piercy plunges into the deepest, most elemental basics of life -- love, aging, illness, and death -- and emerges with a brave, compassionate exploration of the volatile ground between mothers and daughters.

30 review for Three Women

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Shaw

    I was really disappointed with the way characters were written in this novel - the "three women" are all severely whiny and self-obsessed, especially Beverley and Elena, who act like spoiled and ignorant children. Elena, ironically, constantly criticizes her mother's "bourgeois" and "boring" lifestyle despite depending on her mother for all of her practical needs; in the same way, Beverley seems entirely unappreciative of the way in which the entire family unit shifted itself to accommodate and I was really disappointed with the way characters were written in this novel - the "three women" are all severely whiny and self-obsessed, especially Beverley and Elena, who act like spoiled and ignorant children. Elena, ironically, constantly criticizes her mother's "bourgeois" and "boring" lifestyle despite depending on her mother for all of her practical needs; in the same way, Beverley seems entirely unappreciative of the way in which the entire family unit shifted itself to accommodate and support her after the stroke(s), and gets angry (!?) when her family doesn't want to assist her own suicide, as though this is something any normal person would ask of their family...whaaat? My main problem with Piercy's writing (that is, of what I have read) is that the female characters require some sort of male figure (usually a deceptive lover) to "catalyze" their own self-development. Suzanne excepted, Rachel, Elena, and Marta all define themselves after and against some incident involving a man. It belies the "feminist" spirit of the novel to have each of the male characters serve as a catalyst for the "becomings" of the female protagonists. And this is another problem with the text - the male characters are written like wooden plot devices with one of two roles: they are either passionate assholes who give great sex and sweep the women off their feet, only to be later exposed as evil; or, they lack any character whatsoever and are literally shells used by Elena, Beverley, and Suzanne to have casual sex with. And Piercy makes it very clear that Elena doesn't care about Sean; she just uses him for protection and sex. Beverley disdains "love" and has purely "superficial" and sexual relationships with men, and constantly acts superior to anyone else who - heaven forbid - seeks out an emotional connection with a man. The same dichotomy is present in Suzanne's relationships: her first marriage, with Victor, is passionate and quick because, "of course," a passionate man doesn't stick around. And her second, with Sam, is "rational," less passionate, for the sake of convenience. This kind of dichotomy is present throughout, in both the female characters and the male characters, as though human beings can either be crazy bohemians with no responsibilities, out for sex and thrills (Elena, Beverley), or, they are "rational," bourgeois, etc. I detest these kind of sharp dichotomies, because I don't think they exist in reality. I wish the male characters were more believable, more than just demonized plot devices, and that the female characters were less...how shall I say this...annoying and one-dimensional.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mish Middelmann

    A pleasure to reconnect with one of my favourite authors from the 1980s. As always concerned with social justice, personal and wider politics, relationships and sex. And the author gives away something of her own bias in the final words of the book "... and as much kindness as she could muster." In spite of the exterior hardness of her characters, and a lot of scrapping between the three generations that make up the three women, there is a lot of love in action - particularly in response to the d A pleasure to reconnect with one of my favourite authors from the 1980s. As always concerned with social justice, personal and wider politics, relationships and sex. And the author gives away something of her own bias in the final words of the book "... and as much kindness as she could muster." In spite of the exterior hardness of her characters, and a lot of scrapping between the three generations that make up the three women, there is a lot of love in action - particularly in response to the debilitating strokes suffered by one of the women. And I learned a lot about strokes from reading the book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kaylie

    I read this book as fast as possible to dispose of it. Honestly, for an author who claims to be a feminist, her ideas are antiquated. Each protagonist depends on a man yet the men have shallow roles. The interwoven chapters start to all sound the same, too. For a tome thick with drama, including suicide, depression, scandalous sex, and jail time, not much happens. Author Piercy doesn't give her readers much to explore or think critically about and instead spends ample time describing clothing ch I read this book as fast as possible to dispose of it. Honestly, for an author who claims to be a feminist, her ideas are antiquated. Each protagonist depends on a man yet the men have shallow roles. The interwoven chapters start to all sound the same, too. For a tome thick with drama, including suicide, depression, scandalous sex, and jail time, not much happens. Author Piercy doesn't give her readers much to explore or think critically about and instead spends ample time describing clothing choices and careers. This is my first Piercy experience, and I'm disappointed.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alice

    Outstanding writing. Great plotting and character portrayals. Great insight to the human psyche.

  5. 5 out of 5

    PhebeAnn

    This book was really captivating, as I often find Marge Piercy's novels to be. Her characters are fully realized, richly rendered, and complex. I also love her formula here (used in a couple other novels too) of switching between three protagonists' perspectives. It challenged me as a reader to not really 'side' with any one character but to see a situation from multiple perspectives. At this point in my life I identified most with Suzanne, middle aged lawyer trying to hold everyone else togethe This book was really captivating, as I often find Marge Piercy's novels to be. Her characters are fully realized, richly rendered, and complex. I also love her formula here (used in a couple other novels too) of switching between three protagonists' perspectives. It challenged me as a reader to not really 'side' with any one character but to see a situation from multiple perspectives. At this point in my life I identified most with Suzanne, middle aged lawyer trying to hold everyone else together, but I think when I was younger I would have identified most with Elena, Suzanne's 20-something daughter who is somewhat adrift in life. In Elena's character Piercy captures well much of the anger and feeling of purposelessness that I remember feeling so acutely in my teens and early 20s. I perhaps identified the least with Beverly but nevertheless appreciated getting a real window into her experience of aging. This novel was particularly emotionally intense compared to other Piercy novels, with a lot of family drama and one character being witness to an act of terrible violence. Because of these themes it kind of felt like Marge Piercy writing as Joyce Carol Oates! But I typically enjoy Oates, too. (view spoiler)[ I really appreciated too how sensitively Piercy portrays assisted suicide. Because we get Beverly's perspective, and she is able to still write and talk somewhat, it is clear that what she wants is to end her life, so ultimately it is a good death. Beautifully portrayed, and also, as is typical of Piercy, makes a political point about the way we currently treat assistance in dying in the law. (hide spoiler)] The story was heartbreaking in some ways but also very tender, portraying in a very sensitive and authentic way how a family (biological and chosen) responds to crisis points and turning points. It was very well done.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Special Way

    Picked this up outside of Books Through Bars for free. I had the sense she is a feminist writer and that seemed compelling and I'd seen her name around so I thought I'd give it a go. The book began on an upswing sketching out a family run by single moms through two generations. As the pages turn, a variety of relationships between all the women in the family and their exterior friendships/affairs are explored. Initially, the writing seemed convincing; well put together. The first character, Suza Picked this up outside of Books Through Bars for free. I had the sense she is a feminist writer and that seemed compelling and I'd seen her name around so I thought I'd give it a go. The book began on an upswing sketching out a family run by single moms through two generations. As the pages turn, a variety of relationships between all the women in the family and their exterior friendships/affairs are explored. Initially, the writing seemed convincing; well put together. The first character, Suzanne, seemed sharp and in charge. Then Elena, one of the daughters, made her debut and it all went to shit. Elena is an almost entirely despicable character. The worst part about is that Piercy wants Elena to have grown on us by the end because of the positive transformation she's made within herself, except that Elena has done nothing redeemable. In fact, most all the characters in the book, even though I found moments of oblique identification with them, were pretty lousy people. The grandma is a self-interested tyrant whose political work and care for others does not extend to her own family (except Elena of all people). Suzanne is a lawyer who is only well assembled when she's arguing a case and displays the worst in women when she's not. Elena has wasted her life and wants her mommy to pay for it. There's a theme of accountability (or lack there of) and the law. It almost came off as if Piercy wanted to test out a few of the most contentious ways women in the book could go to prison. Murder, adultery, assault, illicit drugs, pedophilia. But these ideas are carelessly explored, tiresome and sensational by the end. I skimmed paragraphs just to find out if the book made an unexpected u-turn in the direction of brilliance. It did not. Piercy certainly has writing talent; but I felt duped as a reader, lured into a story by a ridiculous racy scandals that were not well played out. There's also the clumsiness of inserted email conversations between characters--not a fan. Elements such as these make the novel feel dated and not in a romantic way. I was also disappointed in how feminism was hinted to in various ways but how none of the female characters completely rose above their stereotypes. Although I appreciated at times the degree of candidness the writer used, I just wanted more breakthroughs, less dependance, fewer typical gendered dynamics (why do all the men have to be total losers? why do all the women have to be fundamentally alone, loveless, jaded, naive, pathetic?). It just must not be my wave of feminism--a feminism that strives to break molds, to consider the inequalities women and men are both served in a gender binary. These very interesting ideas and possibilities got thinned out and lost in a wearisome conclusion. Maybe you should just find out which Piercy book people liked the most and read that one instead.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sunflower

    New resolution: I'll get books out of the library instead of always buying them. So I go to the library, armed with my targets picked out from Goodreads, and look for "Gone to Soldiers", but it isn't currently in. So I get this one of hers instead. The title pretty much says it all. The male characters in this story are the bit parts, though their roles in the lives of the Three are important. And it does include "love, sex, betrayal, illness and death" but for me this novel didn't quite get the New resolution: I'll get books out of the library instead of always buying them. So I go to the library, armed with my targets picked out from Goodreads, and look for "Gone to Soldiers", but it isn't currently in. So I get this one of hers instead. The title pretty much says it all. The male characters in this story are the bit parts, though their roles in the lives of the Three are important. And it does include "love, sex, betrayal, illness and death" but for me this novel didn't quite get there. Of the Three, only one of them really interested me. Really only 2.5 stars.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shirley

    I read this book almost 20 years ago--and just referenced it again (forgot it was marge piercy but remembered an important plot to the book that has stayed with me). Looked it up because of situation with mother (who is mostly not like the matriarch in the book) who is completely unaware of her own living with dementia. Who cared for her own mother who starved herself to death when she was done with her life. Gave 3 stars just now but changed it up because I can still remember the book all these I read this book almost 20 years ago--and just referenced it again (forgot it was marge piercy but remembered an important plot to the book that has stayed with me). Looked it up because of situation with mother (who is mostly not like the matriarch in the book) who is completely unaware of her own living with dementia. Who cared for her own mother who starved herself to death when she was done with her life. Gave 3 stars just now but changed it up because I can still remember the book all these years later--that must matter!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    This book was what most feminist literature strives to be. I have to say it was a bit slow, but the characters were believable and touching even at their worst moments.

  10. 4 out of 5

    April

    Interesting exploration of mother-daughter relationships in an upperclass Jewish home. Suzanne, a high powered law professor, is always out of time and energy. Her unionist mother, who barely had time for her, has always been indpendent, but suffers a debilitating stroke, rendering her helpless. Suzanne's oldest daughter Elena has had a troubled childhood and adolescence, and is still struggling with living life on her terms while not damaging herself and others. Her youngest daughter has decide Interesting exploration of mother-daughter relationships in an upperclass Jewish home. Suzanne, a high powered law professor, is always out of time and energy. Her unionist mother, who barely had time for her, has always been indpendent, but suffers a debilitating stroke, rendering her helpless. Suzanne's oldest daughter Elena has had a troubled childhood and adolescence, and is still struggling with living life on her terms while not damaging herself and others. Her youngest daughter has decided, of all things in this non-religious family, to be a rabbi. Piercy details the dance that all of them weave as they struggle to deal with old wrongs and older scars while trying to make their own lives. Independence-Dependence and Trust-Suspicion were two big themes. I didn't really like this book in the beginning, especially Elena's character, but I was glad I stuck with it, as I liked the way the characters grew both together and apart. It would be a good discussion book for a women's club.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rainbowgardener

    Really 4.5 stars. She is one of my favorite authors and her writing as always is vivid with very three dimensional well-realized characters. Several reviewers here complain that the "three women" (three generations of women) are flawed characters. Yes they are, but they all grow and develop and learn through the book, heal their relationships, develop new and better relationships, start on new paths/ journeys. More that you can say about most books!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Carol Turner

    Excellent author. This book is not as good as Gone to Soldiers, but the problem is not the writing. The subject matter - three women of three generations (grandmother, mother, daughter) living together in essentially a soap opera (due to the youngest's seeming inability to care about anyone other than herself at this very moment) does not appeal to me. Thus the 4 stars for the writing/plotting. The actual story would get far less.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ellie

    I thought this book was superb. Yes the charscters are flawed and several are very self serving. That's real life. But they all grow from their experiences. This is a book about real human beings. The central character Suzanne is particularly relatable for anyone who is daily trying to please everyone they love. It's mpossible. A very powerful book: empathetic, compassionate, strong characters, always believable. Outstanding.

  14. 5 out of 5

    BumbleBrie Bourn

    I read this because I really love Marge Piercy, & the library that I go to didn’t have the book that I really wanted to get, “Summer People”, so I got this. I have to tell you, I really didn’t like what they were doing, but about halfway through the book, the tale of the character, Elena suddenly hit at track for me. BUT the ending was good. I read this because I really love Marge Piercy, & the library that I go to didn’t have the book that I really wanted to get, “Summer People”, so I got this. I have to tell you, I really didn’t like what they were doing, but about halfway through the book, the tale of the character, Elena suddenly hit at track for me. BUT the ending was good.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brown Catherine

    One of those stories you really want to know the way it'll end. Some food for thought, too, ie the mothers-daughters relationships, and the end of life choices. I know I won't reread it, but it was a good read and I suspect some of the characters will remain in my mind, at least for a while.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    Uninspiring characters, a wooden writing style...nope, couldn't finish this one.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Suzie

    One of my all time favourite novels. It's beautifully written with wonderful characterisation. A flawless and all-consuming read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mae Delgado

    This novel started our slow for me, then it took a turn and I was hooked. I don't understand the decision at the end other than it made the family closer. Over all it was a good read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Heart wrenchingly beautiful.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Joynton

    Got this as a summer read and did so during travel. I read it in short, interrupted pieces, which could be an influence of how I remember it: It had some wonderful sentences.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Barb

    I haven’t read Marge Pierce in years and so I started this book. I almost quit part way, but then decided to finish. I’m sure it was more relevant in 1999 when it was written.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    A story of three generations of women and how they interact with one another and their place in the family.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Anne Moomey

    Perhaps I would have liked it more if the sexual parts were left to the imagination. Much of the time, I didn’t like any of the characters. It certainly had drama and touched on difficult subjects.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jackie Carpenter

    Excellent and incisive.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    This is the second Marge Piercy book I have read. And I like her as an author. She is not always easy to read and I have at stages disliked characters in both her books, but she is real. The characters are rounded and full. And very real. The first three women of this title are three generation of a family. Grandmother, mother and daughter; all similar women and yet unable to see the similarities. Beverly, the grandmother and Elena, the granddaughter have a kindred spirit, but all the other relat This is the second Marge Piercy book I have read. And I like her as an author. She is not always easy to read and I have at stages disliked characters in both her books, but she is real. The characters are rounded and full. And very real. The first three women of this title are three generation of a family. Grandmother, mother and daughter; all similar women and yet unable to see the similarities. Beverly, the grandmother and Elena, the granddaughter have a kindred spirit, but all the other relationships are fraught and difficult. Suzanne, the middle woman, truly is in the middle. She struggles with her relationship with both her mother and her daughter, but loves them desperately and is unable to articulate this in a way they understand. The essential sameness between these women; their strengths and weaknesses is what keeps them apart for so much of their lives, but what joins them all together in the end. Beverly has a stroke early in the book, and Elena is fired from her job. This causes all three women to be living together in a small house and to have to finally deal with their stuff, and listen to what each actually needs. This slow realisation of each other is griping and intense and very powerful. The three women are also Suzanne, her best friend Marta, and Elena. Marta lives upstairs in the same house as Suzanne with her husband Jim. When Elena and Jim start an affair, the dynamics between these three women and their complicated interconnected relationships brings another layer to this book. This story runs easily alongside the story of the three relatives, and interweaves interestingly. The third set of three women could be seen to be Suzanna, Elena and her sister, Rachel. Rachel is away most of the book, but her character balances that of Elena. Elena is crazy, impulsive and lands up in trouble often. As she puts it she ‘has broken many people’s dishes.’ Rachel is studying to be a rabbi and in many ways is the more stable sister. Until she too realises how badly she has read someone. There are other triumvirates in the book; it is populated by strong likable women. Mothers, daughters, family responsibility and the love contained within families are the themes that run through this absorbing and lingering book. Well worth a read, but don’t expect it to be easy!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Three Women is a book that is sometimes hard to read. This is mostly because through most of the book it is very hard to like any of the major characters. They are all so deeply flawed. The three women are Suzanne, a brilliant attorney and legal professor, her mother Beverly, who is a social activist and the third is Suzanne's eldest daughter Elena. The relationships between the mothers and daughters are difficult and had been that way for as far back as any of them could remember. Suzanne is the Three Women is a book that is sometimes hard to read. This is mostly because through most of the book it is very hard to like any of the major characters. They are all so deeply flawed. The three women are Suzanne, a brilliant attorney and legal professor, her mother Beverly, who is a social activist and the third is Suzanne's eldest daughter Elena. The relationships between the mothers and daughters are difficult and had been that way for as far back as any of them could remember. Suzanne is the only child of single mother Beverly and she always felt that she disappointed her mother because she had become more like her aunt Karla than her mother. Karla had taken over some of the care taking of a young Suzanne when Beverly's work took her away from her child. Elena was the product of an affair her mother had and she has a younger half sister Rachel who is in Israel for much of the book. Circumstances bring the three women together: Elena loses her job and her apartment and invites herself to stay in her mother's home as a woman in her late 20s. Beverly soon follows when a stroke leaves her debilitated and needing much care. Suzanne is pulled in so cry many directions at once: the financial dependence of her family including Rachel who is expecting her mother to foot the bill for her wedding in Israel with her fellow rabbinical student Michael. Suzanne shares the 2-flat home with her best friend Marta and her husband Jim. They are two peripheral characters in the beginning but become much more important as the story goes on. Some of the novel is spent in flashback to Elena's teen years and it serves to demonstrate why Suzanne has so little patience and trust in her oldest daughter. Elena needs her mother support but resents it at the same time. She expects her mother to move out of her home office space so that she does not have to share a bedroom with her sister. But she is obviously hurt the it is a home that is no longer hers. So much happens in the book - and Suzanne finally getting a semblance of a love life is only a side story later in the book - that would only be a spoiler to mention here but somehow the characters become much more redeemable in the end.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    The heroine of Marge Piercy's Three Women is something of a feminist trailblazer: the first woman to teach constitutional law at her big-city university. At five feet three inches, however, Suzanne Blume feels "too small for her role in the world." To compensate, this pint-sized divorcee has transformed herself into a human dynamo, obsessively slicing and dicing the time she devotes to her mother, her two daughters, her students, and her e-mail boyfriend. Yet this rigorously arranged world is tu The heroine of Marge Piercy's Three Women is something of a feminist trailblazer: the first woman to teach constitutional law at her big-city university. At five feet three inches, however, Suzanne Blume feels "too small for her role in the world." To compensate, this pint-sized divorcee has transformed herself into a human dynamo, obsessively slicing and dicing the time she devotes to her mother, her two daughters, her students, and her e-mail boyfriend. Yet this rigorously arranged world is turned upside down when her problematic older daughter moves in, followed by her stubborn, ailing mother. Suzanne's addiction to the clock infuriates her offspring--indeed, Elena has deliberately "chosen to go to the other extreme, exalting spontaneity." And her mother, Beverly, remains a fiery, left-wing activist to the end, spurning such bourgeois amenities as the datebook. It's the ultimate challenge, then, for these three women to peacefully cohabit. What's worse, they're beset by a series of calamities, some shocking, some mundane. Yet this high-tension ménage à trois ultimately learns the value of mutual support and familial love. And along the way, Piercy plunges right into the deepest, most elemental stuff of life: sex, betrayal, aging, illness, and death. She's both brave and compassionate in her exploration of the volatile ground between mothers and daughters--but no less brave than the characters she has created. (Amazon blurb) When I read this in 2007, I neglected to write my own review. So I stole Amazon's.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Randal

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A feminist soap opera of a tale, “Three Women” focuses on the lives of a grandmother, mother, and daughter who are thrown together into the same house after many years of living apart. Each one of the characters seems to think she’s martyred for various reasons. Beverly, the grandmother, has a stroke and is upset that her daughter sells her apartment, even though she can no longer take care of herself. Suzanne, Beverly’s daughter, is under constant stress and has too much to do, never acknowledg A feminist soap opera of a tale, “Three Women” focuses on the lives of a grandmother, mother, and daughter who are thrown together into the same house after many years of living apart. Each one of the characters seems to think she’s martyred for various reasons. Beverly, the grandmother, has a stroke and is upset that her daughter sells her apartment, even though she can no longer take care of herself. Suzanne, Beverly’s daughter, is under constant stress and has too much to do, never acknowledging the choices she makes that contributes to her time dept. Elena, the granddaughter, sleeps around and is a general unrelenting fuck-up. While the grinding nature of mother-daughter relationships comes through, I just couldn’t buy into the drama of the book. Elena, for example, sleeps with her mother’s best friend’s husband while she’s working for him. Oh, did I mention that the best friend and her husband live upstairs in the same house and it turns out that the best friend is pregnant at 46? I enjoyed the tale being told from a feminist perspective, but the basic plot unrealistic and uninspiring.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Eleanor

    This novel needed more work. Eh, the ending was better than some of the rest of it. It wasn't a bad book; it just seems that either some of the characters/situations were too implausible and some of the solutions too pat. Example: instead of exploring the tension between 2 half sisters born 5 years apart, the author makes one a cartoonish rebel and the other one a cartoonish religious who goes off to Israel mostly because the author can't figure out what else to do with her. The older daughter a This novel needed more work. Eh, the ending was better than some of the rest of it. It wasn't a bad book; it just seems that either some of the characters/situations were too implausible and some of the solutions too pat. Example: instead of exploring the tension between 2 half sisters born 5 years apart, the author makes one a cartoonish rebel and the other one a cartoonish religious who goes off to Israel mostly because the author can't figure out what else to do with her. The older daughter and her mother's relationship did deepen and improve over time, which was interesting to read (but even that was implausible. People don't usually mature over night, barring war or disaster scenarios). Bottom line: characters were sketches, not fully formed, even the main one. By no means does this novel "stretch ordinary thinking" as one blurb claims.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    I am a fan of Marge Piercy's poetry, which is pretty blunt and sexual at times. But I'm not as crazy about her fiction. I can see so much of Marge Piercy in this book: feminist characters, sex, jewish, women who cannot count on their men and end up alone because the male species is such a shit. It was extreme and not likeable at times. She's a good writer, and your attention stays with the book. But I didn't care for the suicide, I didn't care for how she lived in the mind of Suzanne after her s I am a fan of Marge Piercy's poetry, which is pretty blunt and sexual at times. But I'm not as crazy about her fiction. I can see so much of Marge Piercy in this book: feminist characters, sex, jewish, women who cannot count on their men and end up alone because the male species is such a shit. It was extreme and not likeable at times. She's a good writer, and your attention stays with the book. But I didn't care for the suicide, I didn't care for how she lived in the mind of Suzanne after her stroke (who really knows what goes on in a person's mind after a stroke?) and the way she portrayed Elena.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.