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Bob Powell's Terror (The Chilling Archives of Horror Comics!, #2)

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Cult favorite Bob Powell was a master 1950s horror cartoonist delineating some of the most imaginative and incredibly drawn comics in the genre. His terrifying ghouls were as gruesome as his tantalizing girls were gorgeous The introduction is by Eisner winner Craig Yoe and details Powell's comics career with extensive and revealing quotes from a recently discovered manuscr Cult favorite Bob Powell was a master 1950s horror cartoonist delineating some of the most imaginative and incredibly drawn comics in the genre. His terrifying ghouls were as gruesome as his tantalizing girls were gorgeous The introduction is by Eisner winner Craig Yoe and details Powell's comics career with extensive and revealing quotes from a recently discovered manuscript about his work penned by Powell himself. The front matter is profusely illustrated with rare ephemera and flawless reproductions of Powell's original art. Bob Powell's Terror prints a generous amount of horror comics stories carefully scanned and reproduced from vintage horror-era comics, many of them quite rare and expensive - if you could find them This beautifully designed, 148-page, library-quality, full-color hardback book is Volume 2 in The Chilling Archives of Horror Comics series. The first volume, still available, was Dick Briefer's Frankenstein, published last Halloween to great acclaim. As with the entire line of Yoe Books, the reproduction techniques employed strive to preserve the look and feel of expensive vintage comics. Painstakingly remastered, enjoy the closest possible recreation of reading these comics when first released.


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Cult favorite Bob Powell was a master 1950s horror cartoonist delineating some of the most imaginative and incredibly drawn comics in the genre. His terrifying ghouls were as gruesome as his tantalizing girls were gorgeous The introduction is by Eisner winner Craig Yoe and details Powell's comics career with extensive and revealing quotes from a recently discovered manuscr Cult favorite Bob Powell was a master 1950s horror cartoonist delineating some of the most imaginative and incredibly drawn comics in the genre. His terrifying ghouls were as gruesome as his tantalizing girls were gorgeous The introduction is by Eisner winner Craig Yoe and details Powell's comics career with extensive and revealing quotes from a recently discovered manuscript about his work penned by Powell himself. The front matter is profusely illustrated with rare ephemera and flawless reproductions of Powell's original art. Bob Powell's Terror prints a generous amount of horror comics stories carefully scanned and reproduced from vintage horror-era comics, many of them quite rare and expensive - if you could find them This beautifully designed, 148-page, library-quality, full-color hardback book is Volume 2 in The Chilling Archives of Horror Comics series. The first volume, still available, was Dick Briefer's Frankenstein, published last Halloween to great acclaim. As with the entire line of Yoe Books, the reproduction techniques employed strive to preserve the look and feel of expensive vintage comics. Painstakingly remastered, enjoy the closest possible recreation of reading these comics when first released.

30 review for Bob Powell's Terror (The Chilling Archives of Horror Comics!, #2)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    I wasn't familiar with Bob Powell's work before picking up this volume, but I'm a fan of this Archives series so I was pretty sure I'd enjoy it. I did enjoy it. It contains precode horror stories from books such as Black Cat, This Magazine is Haunted, Chamber of Chills and others. It's very much a snapshot of horror comics of the 1950s. While I never agreed with the idea comics were turning kids into delinquents, I could see some things that may have alarmed adults in these comics. (The severed I wasn't familiar with Bob Powell's work before picking up this volume, but I'm a fan of this Archives series so I was pretty sure I'd enjoy it. I did enjoy it. It contains precode horror stories from books such as Black Cat, This Magazine is Haunted, Chamber of Chills and others. It's very much a snapshot of horror comics of the 1950s. While I never agreed with the idea comics were turning kids into delinquents, I could see some things that may have alarmed adults in these comics. (The severed heads impaled on the pikes come to mind.) If you are a fan of Golden Age Horror Comics, then you will love this volume. Some of the stories are a bit scary, others are too silly but they are all entertaining. The art is also very good. Not quite EC quality, but then again, no one was. Overall I recommend this one to any fans of horror comics, especially if you don't mind some silliness mixed in.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ralph Carlson

    A nice collection of horror comics from the early fifties. Before the Comics Code.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Perry Lake

    A good friend sent me this book last Xmas. I vaguely recall seeing one or two of these stories, and Powell's art is familiar. You can really tell the man was having fun with these wild, imaginative stories. Later artists might be more refined, but this man loved horror and he loved making comics.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Some of the stories are fun and some are a bit grim and depressing. But all are nicely drawn. One of the stories included features scans of the original uncolored art before any of the garish 50s comics coloring was done. This gives us a better look at what Powell's art and lines really looked like. I wish the stories were written a little better, would make me want to read this collection more than once.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Williwaw

    I bought this when it first came out, but it got lost in a pile of other books. Now that I've organized my shelves somewhat, it beckons to me. Judging by the beautifully illustrated and very informative introduction, and also by the very first story ("The Wall of Flesh," from This Magazine is Haunted, 1953), this book is going to be loads of fun! This is another Craig Yoe production. (I previously read his archival celebration of Steve Ditko: "The Art of Ditko," which is probably the best single v I bought this when it first came out, but it got lost in a pile of other books. Now that I've organized my shelves somewhat, it beckons to me. Judging by the beautifully illustrated and very informative introduction, and also by the very first story ("The Wall of Flesh," from This Magazine is Haunted, 1953), this book is going to be loads of fun! This is another Craig Yoe production. (I previously read his archival celebration of Steve Ditko: "The Art of Ditko," which is probably the best single volume of Ditko reprints available.) I'm thankful to Yoe for bringing lost comic book gems back to life, and for doing it in a way that's true to the originals. To put it bluntly, many of the comic book reprint volumes that publishers are cranking out these days do not actually reprint the original material. Instead, what one gets is a highly modified version of the original, which has been re-colored and re-inked to look more like a modern comic book. To make matters worse, most publishers favor paper with a glossy finish (think magazine paper), which not only looks totally unlike cheap, old comic book paper, but is also hard on the eyes because of its reflective properties. I'm not interested in "updated" versions of archival material. I'm far more interested in something that gives me a feeling of history and authenticity. And that's exactly what you get when you purchase (or borrow a copy) of a Yoe Book. Hooray for Yoe! -*-*-*-*-* Final notes: the most interesting thing about this book for me was the repeated theme of protoplasmic, "blob" type monsters. The opening story, "The Wall of Flesh" (August, 1953) illustrates this theme: a mad medical researcher develops a sort of flesh bank. It's a room full of living flesh that feeds on humans by engulfing and digesting them. The mad doctor falls in love with a nurse, who rejects his advances on the day that her fiance is due to return from the armed services. Enraged by rejection, the doctor lures the nurse into the mass of flesh, and it begins to consume her. Meanwhile, the nurse's fiance arrives, seeks her out, and barely manages to save her. He grasps her hand and pulls, just as she is about to be completely enveloped by the "wall of flesh." Out she comes. An altercation ensues, during which the mad doctor is consumed by his creation. Bob Powell's art, which is excellent throughout this book, is at its best in this first story. He enhances the suspense with a repeated image that superimposes the half-engulfed nurse and the blob onto a clock. It's a clever way of emphasizing the nurse's agonizing struggle, with the hands of the clock showing us that time is running out. I had always thought that the first example of a "blob" story was Joseph Payne Brennan's "Slime" (Weird Tales, 1953). Two of the Powell stories in "Chilling Archives," however,("Jelly of Death" and "It") saw publication in 1952. How about it, anyone? When did the first story about a menacing, protoplasmic mass appear in literature or mass media of any kind? It seems like a cliche now, but that's because of Steve McQueen's famous appearance in the cult film, "The Blob" (1958). (One possible answer: it could have been "Ooze," by Anthony M. Rud. Weird Tales, 1923.)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dominick

    Another of Craig Yoe's oddball collections of old comics, this time horror tales drawn by Bob Powell. Powell is an interesting artist,fond of oddly-proportioned and distorted physiques and gestures, and of interesting shifts in layout and colouring choices--he reminds me a bit of Ditko. Some of the stories, notably the last one presented, have some deliciously creepy moments (e.g. that story ends with the reveal that the protagonist's mouth has been completely sealed over, leaving him a blank ex Another of Craig Yoe's oddball collections of old comics, this time horror tales drawn by Bob Powell. Powell is an interesting artist,fond of oddly-proportioned and distorted physiques and gestures, and of interesting shifts in layout and colouring choices--he reminds me a bit of Ditko. Some of the stories, notably the last one presented, have some deliciously creepy moments (e.g. that story ends with the reveal that the protagonist's mouth has been completely sealed over, leaving him a blank expanse of skin below the nose). Most, however, are pretty generic 1950s horror fodder, and typically, Yoe does little to contextualize them, nor does there seem to be a coherent ordering principle (not as incoherent as some of his other books, mind you). Also, I know there are different views on whether such projects should preserve the originals warts and all, or engage in "restoration" (e.g. cleaning up colour or redoing it, using photoshop to remove or sharpen blurry stuff etc.). I'm sympathetic to both approaches, and I do appreciate Yoe's commitment to showing us the comics as they first appeared--seeing this stuff otherwise would be a challenge, and in this case especially, he does provide some dandy scans of original art. However, when the originals he's scanning have fairly serious legibility problems due to the crappy original printing process, I think some sort of minor tweaking would be in order. Several of the text boxes are hard to read here, given the blurring of the lettering and the over-heaviness of the colour. Such imperfections were certainly part of the original reading experience, but I don't think fixing them is any more of a compromise of the original than is, say, correcting typographical errors in a new edition of a novel. Anyway, horror comics enthusiasts will probably find this a nice volume.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    Bob Powell's rare horror comics are presented for the first time in a lovingly curated and edited collection by Craig Yoe. A brief biographical note on Powell greets the reader so as to ground his graphic work for those unfamiliar with his horror comics and other work. The comics presented span Powell's horror comic career as well as his various recurring titles. For the most part, the stories are horrifying in a way similar to old episodes of "The Twilight Zone". There is some relatively graphi Bob Powell's rare horror comics are presented for the first time in a lovingly curated and edited collection by Craig Yoe. A brief biographical note on Powell greets the reader so as to ground his graphic work for those unfamiliar with his horror comics and other work. The comics presented span Powell's horror comic career as well as his various recurring titles. For the most part, the stories are horrifying in a way similar to old episodes of "The Twilight Zone". There is some relatively graphic gore and Powell certainly had an imagination for forming and rendering various ghouls and monsters. However, I found his stories about the horror of mankind's failings (greed, lust, jealousy, etc.) to be the most interesting, artfully rendered and thought-provoking. It's worth reading for those interested in the (vintage) horror genre, comic book history and pulp fiction. However, I'm not sure how much it would appeal to the casual reader.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    Bob Powell was one of the great unknowns in comics...until now. He was an artist at the Eisner-Iger studios, wrote and drew his own horror stories - compiled here for your enjoyment, was one of the original artists for Sick Magazine and pencilled all those gory Civil War and Batman bubblegum cards for Topps. So far this comp is nothing short of amazing and Craig Yoe should be applauded for putting out so many great obscure comics classics for our enjoyment. The reproductions in the book are excel Bob Powell was one of the great unknowns in comics...until now. He was an artist at the Eisner-Iger studios, wrote and drew his own horror stories - compiled here for your enjoyment, was one of the original artists for Sick Magazine and pencilled all those gory Civil War and Batman bubblegum cards for Topps. So far this comp is nothing short of amazing and Craig Yoe should be applauded for putting out so many great obscure comics classics for our enjoyment. The reproductions in the book are excellent given the age of the works. Although every story's a winner the standout works are "Sewer Monsters" a slimy and gruesome take on Les Miserables, "The Blind The Doomed and The Dead" where Powell stretches out with some excellent Dali-esque surrealism, and "The Devil's Prize" which explores some farflung existentialism. There's some pretty sophisticated takes on horror here by Mister Powell. Highly recommended.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    The second release under Craig Yoe's "Chilling Archives of Horror" banner, Bob Powell's Terror is solid, but never great. The stories – EC Comics-esque in their melodramatic writing and cruel ironies – are rarely coherent. And, while the scanning and presentation are first rate, the sourced materials are often muddy and faded, although two stories are scanned from nearly pristine art boards. For those with a strong stomach for retro weaknesses, the gruesome artwork and imaginative plots are wort The second release under Craig Yoe's "Chilling Archives of Horror" banner, Bob Powell's Terror is solid, but never great. The stories – EC Comics-esque in their melodramatic writing and cruel ironies – are rarely coherent. And, while the scanning and presentation are first rate, the sourced materials are often muddy and faded, although two stories are scanned from nearly pristine art boards. For those with a strong stomach for retro weaknesses, the gruesome artwork and imaginative plots are worth the modest price tag.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Matt Piechocinski

    Awesome. I love classic horror comics with their O Henrian twists. It's a shame that they were subjected to Wertham's witchhunt, because it would have been really interesting to see how they would have evolved if not censored.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Slattery

  12. 5 out of 5

    Onorio Catenacci

  13. 5 out of 5

    Molly

  14. 5 out of 5

    Maplebaroverlord

  15. 4 out of 5

    kevin clark

  16. 4 out of 5

    Richard Humberstone

  17. 5 out of 5

    Shane Green

  18. 5 out of 5

    Josh Dormammu

  19. 5 out of 5

    Viktoria Tomcheva

  20. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ben

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Spaulding

  23. 4 out of 5

    Justin

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ted Faxe

  25. 4 out of 5

    Camhayden

  26. 4 out of 5

    Aidan Fortner

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bill

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ray

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jason Radak

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