counter create hit The Lees of Virginia: Seven Generations of an American Family - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Lees of Virginia: Seven Generations of an American Family

Availability: Ready to download

There are few American families that feature such a collection of characters, both heroic and ignoble, who have made such a mark on history as the Lees. In The Lees of Virginia, Paul Nagel chronicles seven generations of Lees, covering over two hundred years of accolades and scandals. We meet Thomas Lee, who dreamed of America as a continental empire, and his son, Arthur L There are few American families that feature such a collection of characters, both heroic and ignoble, who have made such a mark on history as the Lees. In The Lees of Virginia, Paul Nagel chronicles seven generations of Lees, covering over two hundred years of accolades and scandals. We meet Thomas Lee, who dreamed of America as a continental empire, and his son, Arthur Lee, who created a political storm with his accusations against Benjamin Franklin. Arthur's cousin was Light-Horse Harry Lee, a controversial cavalry officer in the Revolutionary War, whose wild real estate speculation led to imprisonment for debt and finally self-exile in the Caribbean. One of Harry's sons, Henry Lee, further disgraced the family by seducing his sister-in-law and frittering away Stratford, the Lees' ancestral home. It was a third son, Robert E. Lee, who would become the family's redeeming figure, a brilliant tactician still revered for his lofty character and military success. In these and numerous other portraits, Nagel discloses how, from 1640 to 1870, a family spirit united the Lees, making them a force in Virginian and American affairs. This Bicentennial Edition, celebrating the birth of Robert E. Lee in 1807, features a new Preface by the author in which he discusses the ways in which family biographies can contribute to the ongoing debate about what constitutes "family values." Paul Nagel is a leading chronicler of families prominent in our history. His Descent from Glory, a masterful narrative account of four generations of Adamses, was hailed by Chicago Sun-Times as "a magnificent embarrassment of biographical riches." Now, in The Lees of Virginia, Nagel brings his skills to bear on another major American family, taking readers inside the great estates of the Old Dominion and the turbulent lives of the Lee men and women.


Compare

There are few American families that feature such a collection of characters, both heroic and ignoble, who have made such a mark on history as the Lees. In The Lees of Virginia, Paul Nagel chronicles seven generations of Lees, covering over two hundred years of accolades and scandals. We meet Thomas Lee, who dreamed of America as a continental empire, and his son, Arthur L There are few American families that feature such a collection of characters, both heroic and ignoble, who have made such a mark on history as the Lees. In The Lees of Virginia, Paul Nagel chronicles seven generations of Lees, covering over two hundred years of accolades and scandals. We meet Thomas Lee, who dreamed of America as a continental empire, and his son, Arthur Lee, who created a political storm with his accusations against Benjamin Franklin. Arthur's cousin was Light-Horse Harry Lee, a controversial cavalry officer in the Revolutionary War, whose wild real estate speculation led to imprisonment for debt and finally self-exile in the Caribbean. One of Harry's sons, Henry Lee, further disgraced the family by seducing his sister-in-law and frittering away Stratford, the Lees' ancestral home. It was a third son, Robert E. Lee, who would become the family's redeeming figure, a brilliant tactician still revered for his lofty character and military success. In these and numerous other portraits, Nagel discloses how, from 1640 to 1870, a family spirit united the Lees, making them a force in Virginian and American affairs. This Bicentennial Edition, celebrating the birth of Robert E. Lee in 1807, features a new Preface by the author in which he discusses the ways in which family biographies can contribute to the ongoing debate about what constitutes "family values." Paul Nagel is a leading chronicler of families prominent in our history. His Descent from Glory, a masterful narrative account of four generations of Adamses, was hailed by Chicago Sun-Times as "a magnificent embarrassment of biographical riches." Now, in The Lees of Virginia, Nagel brings his skills to bear on another major American family, taking readers inside the great estates of the Old Dominion and the turbulent lives of the Lee men and women.

30 review for The Lees of Virginia: Seven Generations of an American Family

  1. 5 out of 5

    Darlene palmer

    This is about several generations of Lees up to General Lee. It is a genealogists paradise combined with great stories,history and british and new World traditions.

  2. 5 out of 5

    David Medders

    A very fascinating account of one of America's most influential families from the time of the American Revolution through the Civil War. Tales of brilliance and brokenness. Honor and valor co-mingled with melancholy and depression. Self-sacrifice in one, avarice in other. The linage includes scholars, soldiers, politicians, gentleman farmers, and statesmen. From significant wealth to bankruptcy. You will be impressed with the thread of piety in many of the family and the exceptional role of wive A very fascinating account of one of America's most influential families from the time of the American Revolution through the Civil War. Tales of brilliance and brokenness. Honor and valor co-mingled with melancholy and depression. Self-sacrifice in one, avarice in other. The linage includes scholars, soldiers, politicians, gentleman farmers, and statesmen. From significant wealth to bankruptcy. You will be impressed with the thread of piety in many of the family and the exceptional role of wives who were much more than ballast for the fast-sailing careers of of their mates; bright, articulate, pious, courageous, and resolute, especially through the sadness of broken health, loneliness and death. All in all, this is a remarkable study of trans-generational character traits and the positive versus negative influence of growing up within the powerful sphere of a leading American family. Quite the legacy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    This was such a good book I really enjoyed it. Robert E Lee is my fifth cousin on my dads side of the family so I felt like I was reading about a family member though many years ago. It was a fascinating history of the Lee family in Virginia from the 1600 through Robert E Lee. The last four chapters are about him. I would highly recommend to anyone who loves history as I do.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    Accurate and up to date on current genealogical research.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    Not a bad book. Nothing earth shattering. A good overview. A couple things struck me: 1. The author takes great pains to bring "Light Horse" Harry Lee down to earth, spending alot of time on his financial troubles, his treatment of his wife and children, and even calling into question the usually acknowledged excellence of his military service. He often criticizes Lee's well known flaws without presenting any contravening information. Conversely, when talking about areas in which it is usually ack Not a bad book. Nothing earth shattering. A good overview. A couple things struck me: 1. The author takes great pains to bring "Light Horse" Harry Lee down to earth, spending alot of time on his financial troubles, his treatment of his wife and children, and even calling into question the usually acknowledged excellence of his military service. He often criticizes Lee's well known flaws without presenting any contravening information. Conversely, when talking about areas in which it is usually acknowledged Lee excelled the author would take great pains to try and develop caveats to almost all of it. In some cases this becomes very strained and not entirely believable. 2. The authors treatment of Harry Lee's son Robert E. Lee however, borders on the hagiographic. There is much to criticize in Robert E. Lee's life, including his military judgment, but little of that was presented. Disappointing that with the large number of quotations used throughtout the text the author didn't believe footnotes would be helpful. A real lack in my opinion. Despite that however, the book is well worth a read if the Lee family is of interest to you.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Gerry

    I found it boring. While good to know of the Lee family’s from its origins in Virginia to the fourth generation, the one which produced Richard Henry, Francis Lightfoot, and Arthur Lee, I grew less interested as the story moved on. Much of the book details property, finances, and family relationships, it being a biography of a family rather than of one person. Well, one of the good things about growing older is that you don’t have to answer to your teacher as to why you didn’t finish a book!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I picked this book up when genealogy research on ancestry.com revealed a Lee ancestor. Interesting family showing all the disfunction families can have. Great cast of characters.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Keiron

    Am reading by dipping into it on occasions...very funny so far...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    An interesting portrayal of over 200 years of the Lee family's history. An interesting portrayal of over 200 years of the Lee family's history.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lawrence Knorr

  11. 4 out of 5

    Annie

  12. 5 out of 5

    George

  13. 5 out of 5

    Beth

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michael Grogan

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Dael

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bob Harshbarger

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jen

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bobbie

  20. 5 out of 5

    Don

  21. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn Geary

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Taylor

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jim Joyce

  25. 5 out of 5

    Anshul Dhanuka

  26. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Fugate

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michael Ray

  28. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Workman

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bottlegirl

  30. 5 out of 5

    Smith Powell

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.