counter create hit Politics and the Arts: Letter to M. d'Alembert on the Theatre - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Politics and the Arts: Letter to M. d'Alembert on the Theatre

Availability: Ready to download

This excellent translation makes available a classic work central to one of the most interesting controversies of the eighteenth century: the quarrel between Rousseau and Voltaire. Besides containing some of the most sensitive literary criticism ever written (especially of Moli�re), the book is an excellent introduction to the principles of classical political thought. It This excellent translation makes available a classic work central to one of the most interesting controversies of the eighteenth century: the quarrel between Rousseau and Voltaire. Besides containing some of the most sensitive literary criticism ever written (especially of Moli�re), the book is an excellent introduction to the principles of classical political thought. It demonstrates the paradoxes of Rousseau's thought and clearly displays the temperament that led him to repudiate the hopes of the Enlightenment.


Compare

This excellent translation makes available a classic work central to one of the most interesting controversies of the eighteenth century: the quarrel between Rousseau and Voltaire. Besides containing some of the most sensitive literary criticism ever written (especially of Moli�re), the book is an excellent introduction to the principles of classical political thought. It This excellent translation makes available a classic work central to one of the most interesting controversies of the eighteenth century: the quarrel between Rousseau and Voltaire. Besides containing some of the most sensitive literary criticism ever written (especially of Moli�re), the book is an excellent introduction to the principles of classical political thought. It demonstrates the paradoxes of Rousseau's thought and clearly displays the temperament that led him to repudiate the hopes of the Enlightenment.

30 review for Politics and the Arts: Letter to M. d'Alembert on the Theatre

  1. 5 out of 5

    Varad

    This is a crucial yet neglected work by Rousseau, which stands midway between the Second Discourse and the Social Contract. Much of what Rousseau says about the theater and the role of women is anathema to our liberal values, yet it is essential to understanding Rousseau's republicanism and his conception of society and the common good. It is also a critical document for assessing his tempestuous relationship to Geneva, his homeland. One of the most interesting things in the book is the last sec This is a crucial yet neglected work by Rousseau, which stands midway between the Second Discourse and the Social Contract. Much of what Rousseau says about the theater and the role of women is anathema to our liberal values, yet it is essential to understanding Rousseau's republicanism and his conception of society and the common good. It is also a critical document for assessing his tempestuous relationship to Geneva, his homeland. One of the most interesting things in the book is the last section, which contains what might be Rousseau's most fulsome praise of ancient Sparta. Rousseau was the eighteenth-century's greateast admirer, even idolator, of Sparta. Yet in the Letter his encomia cross from enthusiastic to the fervid. Because that praise exemplifies so much of what was fundamental in Rousseau's thinking, both it and the Letter as a whole are mandatory reading for anyone who wishes to understand him. Published Friday, 15 June 2012

  2. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Hawco

    I don't always agree with what he says, but damn do I like the way he says it. I don't always agree with what he says, but damn do I like the way he says it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Nobody knows the trouble Rousseau’s seen. As much as I treasure and esteem the systematic work of Hegel and Kant, neither of them have the passion that R evinces upon this or that page. His insights are so profound ... one of my mentors would say of Kant that he had no idea how far his investigations would take him. I think of Rousseau it can be said that his insights were so profound that he could not hold to them. He had to betray his own realizations. Here is a book about the theatre, ostensi Nobody knows the trouble Rousseau’s seen. As much as I treasure and esteem the systematic work of Hegel and Kant, neither of them have the passion that R evinces upon this or that page. His insights are so profound ... one of my mentors would say of Kant that he had no idea how far his investigations would take him. I think of Rousseau it can be said that his insights were so profound that he could not hold to them. He had to betray his own realizations. Here is a book about the theatre, ostensibly, but what it really addresses is the power and danger of mass culture. It foresees television and film long before the inventions making them possible had been conceived. Right now my favorite section is the seventh part, in which among other things Rousseau states the dangers of populism. Yet his comments on the power of the imagination are also telling.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    An amusing idea at first, former philosophic colleagues battling over a paragraph one entered into the encyclopedia, with Rousseau taking the austere path of morality and finding fault with every aspect of the proposed civic theatre. Yet the more he looks into the assumed wonton immorality of actors (especially actresses) and their craft, the more he reveals his unenlightened (by today’s standards) view of gender politics. As much as he invokes the Spartan lifestyle for his little republic, he n An amusing idea at first, former philosophic colleagues battling over a paragraph one entered into the encyclopedia, with Rousseau taking the austere path of morality and finding fault with every aspect of the proposed civic theatre. Yet the more he looks into the assumed wonton immorality of actors (especially actresses) and their craft, the more he reveals his unenlightened (by today’s standards) view of gender politics. As much as he invokes the Spartan lifestyle for his little republic, he negatively influences a true appreciation of the dramatic arts as the vehicle of a empathetic community. No doubt d’Alembert rolled his eyes at the flood of ignorance pouring forth from the future author of the Social Contract.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alice Domenis

    I love passion and quarrels!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Brilliant.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rose

    I disagree with almost all of it (between Rousseau's attitude to women, and his vehement disapproval of theatre and emotive tales, we we're never going to agree here), but it has been helpful to read nonetheless, and has been, in terms of writing style, an easy read. I disagree with almost all of it (between Rousseau's attitude to women, and his vehement disapproval of theatre and emotive tales, we we're never going to agree here), but it has been helpful to read nonetheless, and has been, in terms of writing style, an easy read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Lamp

    I tried my hardest to finish this slog of a treatise, but I simply couldn't get through it all. "Politics and the Arts" is Rousseau's response to Monsieur D'Alembert's public letter explaining the need for the establishment of a theatre in Geneva. Rousseau responded with a lengthy explanation as to why this was a bad idea, offering up a stew of just-so reasonings, half-remembered explications of the moral and aesthetic content of Moliere's most famous plays, complaints about women's political em I tried my hardest to finish this slog of a treatise, but I simply couldn't get through it all. "Politics and the Arts" is Rousseau's response to Monsieur D'Alembert's public letter explaining the need for the establishment of a theatre in Geneva. Rousseau responded with a lengthy explanation as to why this was a bad idea, offering up a stew of just-so reasonings, half-remembered explications of the moral and aesthetic content of Moliere's most famous plays, complaints about women's political empowerment, and fallacious claims about authenticity to make his argument. It is, to put it simply, a mess of contradictions, oversimplifications, and biases masquerading as facts. The translation, however, is clear and good, as are Bloom's extensive footnotes, warranting a two-star rating instead of a one-star rating.

  9. 4 out of 5

    dameolga

    Finally finished it!!--not that it's a difficult text to read. In fact, of all the texts I had to read for my Enlightenment and Critics class, Politics and the Arts is one of the more straightforward ones. Though I certainly don't agree with some of Rousseau's beliefs (especially as I'm female), Rousseau does offer wonderful insights into the negative effects of the "modern public" and the culture of theater. He both seems like a conservative, old man by today's standards yet also very liberal, Finally finished it!!--not that it's a difficult text to read. In fact, of all the texts I had to read for my Enlightenment and Critics class, Politics and the Arts is one of the more straightforward ones. Though I certainly don't agree with some of Rousseau's beliefs (especially as I'm female), Rousseau does offer wonderful insights into the negative effects of the "modern public" and the culture of theater. He both seems like a conservative, old man by today's standards yet also very liberal, especially with regards to the subject of sex. Can't say I would like Rousseau personally if I met him, but pretty interesting read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Rouseau's justification of censorship. He reviews most of the standard arguments: uncensored material undermines the morals of citizens, women and minors. For Rousseau, the enemy to be censored is theatrical performance rather than political writing. However, the basic premise is the same: we need to be protected from ourselves. Rouseau's justification of censorship. He reviews most of the standard arguments: uncensored material undermines the morals of citizens, women and minors. For Rousseau, the enemy to be censored is theatrical performance rather than political writing. However, the basic premise is the same: we need to be protected from ourselves.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ginger Price

    Maybe it's because I read this after Plato's _Republic_ and Aristotle's _Poetics_, but this was a breath of fresh air. Bloom's translation is wonderful; this text was very accessible. The section about women is pretty offensive and antiquated, but that was really only a relatively small section of the discourse. Maybe it's because I read this after Plato's _Republic_ and Aristotle's _Poetics_, but this was a breath of fresh air. Bloom's translation is wonderful; this text was very accessible. The section about women is pretty offensive and antiquated, but that was really only a relatively small section of the discourse.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joe Sacksteder

    I like the part where Rousseau scandalously endorses dancing by unmarried youngsters under strict, collective surveillance. (I mean, he's crazy, but not Puritan crazy.) And the part where, to reinforce creepy gender roles, he offers as supporting evidence his current vantage of pigeons fucking. I like the part where Rousseau scandalously endorses dancing by unmarried youngsters under strict, collective surveillance. (I mean, he's crazy, but not Puritan crazy.) And the part where, to reinforce creepy gender roles, he offers as supporting evidence his current vantage of pigeons fucking.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nina Pezz

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay Williams

  15. 4 out of 5

    Luis

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

  17. 4 out of 5

    Yelda Basar Moers

  18. 4 out of 5

    Leyla

  19. 4 out of 5

    Julian

  20. 4 out of 5

    John Ervin

  21. 4 out of 5

    McKay Holland

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca LeMoine

  23. 5 out of 5

    Giorgi

  24. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Simons

  25. 5 out of 5

    Melisa Atay

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  27. 5 out of 5

    Heather Hamilton

  28. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Bergen

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bradley Lllllllll

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.