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Supreme Court in the Intimate Lives of Americans: Birth, Sex, Marriage, Childrearing, and Death

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Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2003 Personal rights, such as the right to procreate--or not--and the right to die generate endless debate. This book maps out the legal, political, and ethical issues swirling around personal rights. Howard Ball shows how the Supreme Court has grappled with the right to reproduce and to abort, and takes on the issue of auto-euthanasia and Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2003 Personal rights, such as the right to procreate--or not--and the right to die generate endless debate. This book maps out the legal, political, and ethical issues swirling around personal rights. Howard Ball shows how the Supreme Court has grappled with the right to reproduce and to abort, and takes on the issue of auto-euthanasia and assisted suicide, from Karen Ann Quinlan through Kevorkian and just recently to the Florida case of the woman who was paralyzed by a gunshot from her mother and who had the plug pulled on herself. For the last half of the twentieth century, the justices of the Supreme Court have had to wrestle with new and difficult life and death questions for them as well as for doctors and their patients, medical ethicists, sociologists, medical practitioners, clergy, philosophers, law makers, and judges. The Supreme Court in the Intimate Lives of Americans offers a look at these issues as they emerged and examines the manner in which the men and women of the U.S. Supreme Court addressed them.


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Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2003 Personal rights, such as the right to procreate--or not--and the right to die generate endless debate. This book maps out the legal, political, and ethical issues swirling around personal rights. Howard Ball shows how the Supreme Court has grappled with the right to reproduce and to abort, and takes on the issue of auto-euthanasia and Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2003 Personal rights, such as the right to procreate--or not--and the right to die generate endless debate. This book maps out the legal, political, and ethical issues swirling around personal rights. Howard Ball shows how the Supreme Court has grappled with the right to reproduce and to abort, and takes on the issue of auto-euthanasia and assisted suicide, from Karen Ann Quinlan through Kevorkian and just recently to the Florida case of the woman who was paralyzed by a gunshot from her mother and who had the plug pulled on herself. For the last half of the twentieth century, the justices of the Supreme Court have had to wrestle with new and difficult life and death questions for them as well as for doctors and their patients, medical ethicists, sociologists, medical practitioners, clergy, philosophers, law makers, and judges. The Supreme Court in the Intimate Lives of Americans offers a look at these issues as they emerged and examines the manner in which the men and women of the U.S. Supreme Court addressed them.

15 review for Supreme Court in the Intimate Lives of Americans: Birth, Sex, Marriage, Childrearing, and Death

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lightreads

    A review of SCOTUS privacy cases, heavy on the interpersonal back-and-forth between the Justices in closed conference, and light on legal analysis beyond the merely descriptive. Which might make this a good book for the lay reader, but I have my doubts – there's an awful lot of procedural knowledge assumed, and the quick two-step through first principles (substantive due process, the transition from Lochner to West Coast Hotel, etc.) might actually be more confusing than anything. Then again, on A review of SCOTUS privacy cases, heavy on the interpersonal back-and-forth between the Justices in closed conference, and light on legal analysis beyond the merely descriptive. Which might make this a good book for the lay reader, but I have my doubts – there's an awful lot of procedural knowledge assumed, and the quick two-step through first principles (substantive due process, the transition from Lochner to West Coast Hotel, etc.) might actually be more confusing than anything. Then again, one thing law school has done to me is make it very difficult to remember how nonlawyers think, so I could be completely wrong on that. Anyway, nice enough presentation of highly topical issues, with a very simple argument about the personal nature of decision-making in privacy cases. Most interesting for those eras where judicial papers have been unsealed, and less so for the more recent cases.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tina

  3. 4 out of 5

    Drpsychorat

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amy Higgins

  5. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Call-morin

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tami Guo

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brooks

  8. 5 out of 5

    K.O.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jayakrishnan

  10. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jess B

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Van Wart

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sonya

  14. 4 out of 5

    asunshine

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mander Pander

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