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Every time surgeons operate, they're betting their skills are better than the brain tumor, the faulty heart valve, the fractured femur. Sometimes, they're wrong. At Chelsea General, surgeons answer for bad outcomes at the Morbidity and Mortality conference, known as M & M. This extraordinary peek behind the curtain into what is considered the most secretive meeting in all Every time surgeons operate, they're betting their skills are better than the brain tumor, the faulty heart valve, the fractured femur. Sometimes, they're wrong. At Chelsea General, surgeons answer for bad outcomes at the Morbidity and Mortality conference, known as M & M. This extraordinary peek behind the curtain into what is considered the most secretive meeting in all of medicine is the back drop for the entire book. Monday Mornings, by Dr. Sanjay Gupta, follows the lives of five surgeons at Chelsea General as they push the limits of their abilities and confront their personal and professional failings, often in front of their peers at M & M. It is on Monday mornings that reflection and introspection occurs, usually in private. It is Monday Mornings that provides a unique look at the real method in which surgeons learn - through their mistakes. It is Monday Mornings when, if you're lucky, you have a chance at redemption.


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Every time surgeons operate, they're betting their skills are better than the brain tumor, the faulty heart valve, the fractured femur. Sometimes, they're wrong. At Chelsea General, surgeons answer for bad outcomes at the Morbidity and Mortality conference, known as M & M. This extraordinary peek behind the curtain into what is considered the most secretive meeting in all Every time surgeons operate, they're betting their skills are better than the brain tumor, the faulty heart valve, the fractured femur. Sometimes, they're wrong. At Chelsea General, surgeons answer for bad outcomes at the Morbidity and Mortality conference, known as M & M. This extraordinary peek behind the curtain into what is considered the most secretive meeting in all of medicine is the back drop for the entire book. Monday Mornings, by Dr. Sanjay Gupta, follows the lives of five surgeons at Chelsea General as they push the limits of their abilities and confront their personal and professional failings, often in front of their peers at M & M. It is on Monday mornings that reflection and introspection occurs, usually in private. It is Monday Mornings that provides a unique look at the real method in which surgeons learn - through their mistakes. It is Monday Mornings when, if you're lucky, you have a chance at redemption.

30 review for Monday Mornings

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nette

    I'm only two chapters in, but this book contains one of the funniest bad sentences I've ever come across so I want to memorialize it in case I don't finish (which is likely): "He passed...the group of obstetricians trying to coax a young fetus to stay in its mother's womb..." Are the older fetuses easier to persuade?

  2. 4 out of 5

    ☮Karen

    I enjoyed this much more than I thought I would after owning a copy for quite some time. We know Dr. Gupta from his television commentaries, but he is really a practicing neurosurgeon and also a very good writer. He wrote this with empathy and caring for both the doctors and patients, and with humor too. I would read him again.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Aoibhínn

    Set in the state of Michigan, Monday Mornings follows the lives of five surgeons at Chelsea General as they push the limits of their abilities and confront their personal and professional failings, often in front of their peers at the Morbidity and Mortality conferences held on Monday mornings. It is Monday mornings that provides a unique look at the real method in which surgeons learn – through their mistakes. It is Monday mornings when, if they're lucky, they have a chance at redemption. I dec Set in the state of Michigan, Monday Mornings follows the lives of five surgeons at Chelsea General as they push the limits of their abilities and confront their personal and professional failings, often in front of their peers at the Morbidity and Mortality conferences held on Monday mornings. It is Monday mornings that provides a unique look at the real method in which surgeons learn – through their mistakes. It is Monday mornings when, if they're lucky, they have a chance at redemption. I decided to finally read this novel after learning it is going to be turned into a TV series which will be similar to ER. I was a huge fan of ER (and most of the other medical dramas) and after I read that in a magazine I couldn't wait to read this book! I really enjoyed this novel. It is actually very similar to ER. At times during reading this book, I did feel like I was reading an ER script just with different characters! The plot was interesting, gripping, well-developed and well-written. The medical lingo was easy to understand. After years of watching ER, Grey's Anatomy and other medical TV programmes I actually understood a lot of it and the dictionary on my Kindle explained any medical terms I didn't know. The characters were interesting, vivid and well-developed. My only gripe about this novel was that I would have liked to learn more about what happened to the characters at the end of the novel. (view spoiler)[What happened to Tina Ridgeway's marriage after she left the hospital to join her father's medical practice? And what happened to Dr Park? Ty Wilson said he was "out of the picture". What did that mean? Did he die from his illness or did he survive and leave the hospital to find another less demanding job so he could spend more time with his family? What happened!! (hide spoiler)] After finishing this novel, I'm now looking forward to watching the TV show! Four stars!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    I really wanted to like this book because I really like Sanjay Gupta. I read this just after reading "When the Air Hits Your Brain" which was excellent so the comparison may be hindering my review here. But, this book badly needed a good editor first of all. There were many typos throughout and contradictions from one paragraph to the next. A tumor was benign in one sentence and cancerous in the next. The characters were not really likable or memorable. I read this book a week ago and can't real I really wanted to like this book because I really like Sanjay Gupta. I read this just after reading "When the Air Hits Your Brain" which was excellent so the comparison may be hindering my review here. But, this book badly needed a good editor first of all. There were many typos throughout and contradictions from one paragraph to the next. A tumor was benign in one sentence and cancerous in the next. The characters were not really likable or memorable. I read this book a week ago and can't really seem to remember them at all. I'm not an expert but .... the nurses don't want to take care of a gang banger who shot his grandmother? Most RN's I know view the patient as just that - their patient that they need to care for. If you don't take care of gang bangers in an inner city hospital you better look for another job. The Director of Nursing had to come and "talk" to the ICU nurses so that they would care for the patient? And the ER doctor got a transplant patient admitted upstairs without the neurologist seeing the patient? ER doctors don't usually have admitting privileges (their malpractice companies frown on that) and the patient would have had to have admitting orders. There are so many medical mistakes in this book that I can only think he did not write this book. He obviously wrote the descriptions on neuro-surgery, but the medical mistakes just don't make sense coming from a doctor. I know, I know, this is a book of fiction, but good fiction writers do research so as to be accurate. The voice of this book doesn't sound like the voice of Sanjay Guptah. Seriously disappointed. Can't forgive portraying the nurses as unprofessional.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Janet Whalen

    Ensemble cast book about surgeons at a mythical hospital outside Ann Arbor. Gupta went to school at U of M,(oddly we were in the same dorm at the same time and I'm pretty sure we had a class together)thus I presume he invented Chelsea General to avoid any possible legal issues with setting the book at University of Michigan Medical Centers. The inner lives of a variety of Docs, mainly surgeons, are explored as they struggle with multiple challenges. I wanted to like this book more than I did. Ye Ensemble cast book about surgeons at a mythical hospital outside Ann Arbor. Gupta went to school at U of M,(oddly we were in the same dorm at the same time and I'm pretty sure we had a class together)thus I presume he invented Chelsea General to avoid any possible legal issues with setting the book at University of Michigan Medical Centers. The inner lives of a variety of Docs, mainly surgeons, are explored as they struggle with multiple challenges. I wanted to like this book more than I did. Yes, famous surgeons can make mistakes that cost lives, and this is an incredible burden. Actually, everyone in health care carries this burden, including nurses, technicians and therapists of multiple stripes, and most of us aren't swimming in money. At one point in the book, a surgeon who has become emotionally paralyzed by a fatal mistake hops a flight to Miami to stay in a luxury hotel, then flies to Colorado to see his sister for a cup of tea to talk about it. I recognize that it takes incredible drive, intelligence and stamina to survive and thrive in high-powered academic medicine. I couldn't get through the years of coursework followed by marathon shifts of internships and residencies, then continued expectations of research, publications and teaching while trying to care for patients in practice. Much of the public thinks that Doctors are Gods, and Gupta shows us that they are deeply flawed gods. But he by no means undermines the idea that they are gods. Some of his characters show righteous anger at the injustices of the system. Tina, one of the doctors who's story we follow, becomes angry and complains to her boss when a resident is tossed for an error no more egregious than others committed by surgeons in the course of the book. But the resident is booted anyway. I'm not clear what point Gupta is making. He doesn't take the obvious opportunity to attack the System. The System has been very very good to Dr. Gupta, and indeed he praises its internal discipline. He appears blind to how the system itself causes errors by expecting men and women to be as Gods; hubris anyone? Most of his major characters achieve some sort of resolution by the end of the book, but I am left wanting. Gupta's characters seem blissfully unaware of their supporting cast of nurses and other healthcare providers. One nurse achieves the status of character, but only due to her relationship with a surgeon. A great deal of medical terminology is tossed about within the book. I understand it, but I would think many of his readers outside of the health professions would not. Im not certain if all the technical language is there for atmosphere or to remind people that medicine is a world apart or what. As a nurse, I did appreciate the authenticity. He did give an inside look at medicine, but I was left unsatisfied ultimately, unclear exactly what Gupta's point really was.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Britany

    The pager vibrates... "311 6" the key that unlocks the world of Chelsea General. 311 is the room number at 6am on Monday mornings that the team of doctors meet, to right their wrongs, and learn from their mistakes. Many different characters fill this book, each with their own personalities and flaws, interconnecting together, leaving the reader with snippets of the people behind the scenes in crisis, putting together the broken pieces of their patients. Cannot believe the ending! Can't say any mor The pager vibrates... "311 6" the key that unlocks the world of Chelsea General. 311 is the room number at 6am on Monday mornings that the team of doctors meet, to right their wrongs, and learn from their mistakes. Many different characters fill this book, each with their own personalities and flaws, interconnecting together, leaving the reader with snippets of the people behind the scenes in crisis, putting together the broken pieces of their patients. Cannot believe the ending! Can't say any more without giving anything away, just wasn't expecting so many things to happen all at once.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Madeline

    I couldn't write a better description of this novel, so I copied this paragraph from the cover: Monday Mornings, by Dr. Sanjay Gupta, follows the lives of five surgeons at Chelsea General as they push the limits of their abilities and confront their personal and professional failings, often in front of their peers at M & M. It is on Monday mornings that reflection and introspection occurs, usually in private. It is Monday Mornings that provides a unique look at the real method in which surgeons I couldn't write a better description of this novel, so I copied this paragraph from the cover: Monday Mornings, by Dr. Sanjay Gupta, follows the lives of five surgeons at Chelsea General as they push the limits of their abilities and confront their personal and professional failings, often in front of their peers at M & M. It is on Monday mornings that reflection and introspection occurs, usually in private. It is Monday Mornings that provides a unique look at the real method in which surgeons learn - through their mistakes. It is Monday Mornings when, if you're lucky, you have a chance at redemption. First off, I have to say that I have always loved medicine and the human body. Sanjay Gupta writes such a vivid, intense, realistic account of the emergencies and operations, that I swear I was in the room the whole time. I was about half way through the story when I read that this was FICTION. I was literally shocked and a little embarrassed at not knowing this before I started the story. Anyways, I quickly recovered and sped through the pages as fast as they could say, "code blue." I rarely give 5 stars to fiction novels, but I was very happily bumbling around after those Dr's like a newborn puppy.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Save yourself 300 pages and watch an episode of Grey's Anatomy instead. Gupta's characters are flat and the plot lacks cohesion and direction. The writing isn't that good, either. And to add insult to injury, the medicine in this book, as well as the drama of the hospital setting feels disingenuous. It feels like Gupta was working so hard to create characters with high drama and emotional affect that he forgot a hospital has plenty of that already, and he needn't add wonton affairs (at least 6 c Save yourself 300 pages and watch an episode of Grey's Anatomy instead. Gupta's characters are flat and the plot lacks cohesion and direction. The writing isn't that good, either. And to add insult to injury, the medicine in this book, as well as the drama of the hospital setting feels disingenuous. It feels like Gupta was working so hard to create characters with high drama and emotional affect that he forgot a hospital has plenty of that already, and he needn't add wonton affairs (at least 6 characters at any given time), disrespectful portrayals of nurses and hospital staff (surgeons are the only characters he respects), and stereotyped images of poor and minority characters.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    As I am a surgical trainee, the characters feel very familiar from a personality standpoint. However, some of the situations in the book smacks of a ghost writer. Example #1 - I have never heard of any teaching hospital in America where there are no residents at M&M. In fact, to be a certified residency, all hospital sites from the community affiliate to the University flagship hospital must have a regularly scheduled surgical M&M conference which residents are required to attend. Example #2 - Th As I am a surgical trainee, the characters feel very familiar from a personality standpoint. However, some of the situations in the book smacks of a ghost writer. Example #1 - I have never heard of any teaching hospital in America where there are no residents at M&M. In fact, to be a certified residency, all hospital sites from the community affiliate to the University flagship hospital must have a regularly scheduled surgical M&M conference which residents are required to attend. Example #2 - There seems to be a lot of this Grey's Anatomy style blending of specialties and surgical subspecialties where they have one attending doing head trauma one minute and then ex-laping a patient the next day. Example #3 - Having done several months of Trauma at the busiest trauma center in the midwest, I have never seen a group of health care works have to be convinced to treat a patient because of their personal beliefs about that patient. The scene with the neo-Nazi kid and the nurses who had to be cajoled into treating him is completely unrealistic and insulting to RNs. Unfortunately, I wouldn't be surprised if this scene was actually written by Sanjay Gupta. Its not like he hasn't been known to pretend not to know basic facts about medicine in America to make a buck. Or maybe that whole Michael Moore interview was just a fluke.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Katie Bananas

    From CNN's own renowned medical reporter, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, I expected so much more. With the amount of knowledge of medicine he has, I expected a more decent writing style, which this book didn't represent any of it. I didn't like the beginning chapters of the book, because of the constant use of foul language. This book is about a group of neurosurgeons and how they come about to deal with life while doctoring. Stress is very emphasized without question, the language was too strong, even thoug From CNN's own renowned medical reporter, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, I expected so much more. With the amount of knowledge of medicine he has, I expected a more decent writing style, which this book didn't represent any of it. I didn't like the beginning chapters of the book, because of the constant use of foul language. This book is about a group of neurosurgeons and how they come about to deal with life while doctoring. Stress is very emphasized without question, the language was too strong, even though each one was surrounded by his patients. Each doctor is shown to have committed a malpractice lawsuit, that puts him/her on the spot in the Monday Mornings Room 311 at 6:00 am. I didn't appreciate the book until the ending chapters and Dr. Park's chapters as well. The medical facts were good and I learned a lot from them, but I don't think being a doctor requires a foul mouth to deal with all the stress, even though each one had troubles at home. Being a doctor is a responsibility, which requires patience and strength in character to endure to study all the cases presented to properly act upon them. Although the book could have been a better one in multiple ways, I believe and understand that not everyone is born with an innate talent to write.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Sandham Mathwin

    Overall, I enjoyed "Monday Mornings." It provided an entertaining refresher on some medical conditions that I learned about in nursing school but had sort of forgotten about. It also dealt honestly and fairly with a very real issue...the fact that all medical providers-even excellent ones-make mistake sometimes. On the down side, the last third of the novel was very melodramatic-too many main characters having tragedy befall them all around the same time. It felt forced. Also, some of the main c Overall, I enjoyed "Monday Mornings." It provided an entertaining refresher on some medical conditions that I learned about in nursing school but had sort of forgotten about. It also dealt honestly and fairly with a very real issue...the fact that all medical providers-even excellent ones-make mistake sometimes. On the down side, the last third of the novel was very melodramatic-too many main characters having tragedy befall them all around the same time. It felt forced. Also, some of the main characters were not particularly well-developed and tended to be sort of one dimensional. Lastly, I wish there would have been a little more focus on the nurses. There was only one character in "Monday Mornings" who was a nurse and while thankfully she was portrayed as an intelligent person she had a comparatively very minor role. Additionally, I wasn't too happy with the way the other nurses in the book were portrayed (gawking at the handsome surgeon and giggling like little schoolgirls about how good looking he was, etc.).

  12. 5 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    3.5 This book paints a very human face on the surgeons of the prestigious teaching hospital, Chelsea General. Interesting reading on the case histories of patients presented as well as the lives of these doctors. The book follows them through illnesses, regrets, affairs, mistakes, many which are exposed and answered for during the notorious and highly stressful Monday mornings. Interesting reading about the inner workings of this hospital and some of the moments were humorous as well.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This book was not worth my time. It's a potentially interesting subject handled with the aplomb of a freshman creative writing student. The characters are cardboard cutouts of real people. While each main character has his or her own story arc, these arcs don't intersect in any meaningful way, which left me feeling pretty unsatisfied. And none of the characters is sufficiently well-rounded enough to be satisfying in their own right. While the book claims to be about Morbidity and Mortality meetin This book was not worth my time. It's a potentially interesting subject handled with the aplomb of a freshman creative writing student. The characters are cardboard cutouts of real people. While each main character has his or her own story arc, these arcs don't intersect in any meaningful way, which left me feeling pretty unsatisfied. And none of the characters is sufficiently well-rounded enough to be satisfying in their own right. While the book claims to be about Morbidity and Mortality meetings, and these meetings pop up often enough, the scenes are anticlimactic and are not really a strong focal point for the book. The meetings seem to have no significance in the story, except the scenes in which they actually take place. Then every one goes on about their business. Bummer b/c I thought it sounded interesting.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Ugh, Dr. Gupta needs to have his own M&M meeting to explain this book. A practicing neurosurgeon should not have so many mistakes in a book, even if it is a novel. He doesn't even know ACLS protocol (you can't shock a patient in asystole). Someone who doesn't know much about the medical field might enjoy this book, but I kinda doubt it. He presents too many characters and doesn't delve too deeply into any of their lives. He does try to, but he repeats a lot of each physician's story EVERY time h Ugh, Dr. Gupta needs to have his own M&M meeting to explain this book. A practicing neurosurgeon should not have so many mistakes in a book, even if it is a novel. He doesn't even know ACLS protocol (you can't shock a patient in asystole). Someone who doesn't know much about the medical field might enjoy this book, but I kinda doubt it. He presents too many characters and doesn't delve too deeply into any of their lives. He does try to, but he repeats a lot of each physician's story EVERY time he writes about that particular character. Not a memorable book at all. He even rips off "007-a license to kill" straight from an early season of Grey's Anatomy. Dr. Gupta, don't quit your multiple day jobs.

  15. 4 out of 5

    ♥ Sandi ❣

    I really enjoyed this book. It followed 5 doctors, their medical lives, their personal lives and their fear of medical mistakes. "Monday morning" refers to a text message and meeting exclusively for Drs - with one of them being chastized for a recent medical mistake - possibly a life threatening mistake. If this is not a current medical practice, it should be. I rated this book 4 stars.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Louise

    Grand Central Publishing | March 6, 2012 | Hardcover |ISBN 978-0-446-58385-5 Story Description: Every time surgeons operate, they're betting their skills are better than the brain tumor, the faulty heart valve, the fractured femur. Sometimes, they're wrong. At Chelsea General, surgeons answer for bad outcomes at the Morbidity and Mortality conference, known as M & M. This extraordinary peek behind the curtain into what is considered the most secretive meeting in all of medicine is the back drop fo Grand Central Publishing | March 6, 2012 | Hardcover |ISBN 978-0-446-58385-5 Story Description: Every time surgeons operate, they're betting their skills are better than the brain tumor, the faulty heart valve, the fractured femur. Sometimes, they're wrong. At Chelsea General, surgeons answer for bad outcomes at the Morbidity and Mortality conference, known as M & M. This extraordinary peek behind the curtain into what is considered the most secretive meeting in all of medicine is the back drop for the entire book. Monday Mornings, by Dr. Sanjay Gupta, follows the lives of five surgeons at Chelsea General as they push the limits of their abilities and confront their personal and professional failings, often in front of their peers at M & M. It is on Monday mornings that reflection and introspection occurs, usually in private. It is Monday Mornings that provides a unique look at the real method in which surgeons learn - through their mistakes. It is Monday Mornings when, if you're lucky, you have a chance at redemption. My Review: MONDAY MORNINGS reads like a drama, an adventure, a suspense, a bit of romance all rolled into one. This fast paced novel keeps you turning page after page. Five surgeons from the fictional Chelsea General Hospital take on various patients with various complaints and health conditions. Some are extremely serious, some not so serious. We all seem to forget that doctors and surgeons are humans like us, and humans make mistakes and doctors are no exception. Each Monday morning the doctors hold an M & M meeting, Mortality and Morbidity where someone is called up on the carpet in front of their peers and must admit their mistakes. These are closed meetings with no CEO’s, no lawyers, and no other administrators present. These meetings are strictly for the doctors only to hash out what went wrong and how they can prevent certain mistakes and disasters from ever happening again. One particular doctor was responsible for killing a young boy and as anyone who has a conscience would, drove this poor man into a serious state of fear and doubt over his ability to continue as a surgeon. The meetings are a way for these doctors to learn through their mistakes. Although written as fiction, this novel reads like real life and I’m pretty certain what is written in this novel is not too far from the truth of what really does go on. I can see now why doctors must purchase large and exorbitant amounts of malpractice insurance. As Samuel Shem, MD said of Monday Mornings, the novel is “filled with memorable characters and searing moments, written with a surgeon’s deftness and a healer’s heart”. Dr. Gupta has done an excellent job and gets two thumbs up from me and I’ll be recommending it to my friends for sure. Very well done!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Shari Larsen

    In this novel by neurosurgeon and CNN medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta, we get a behind the scenes peek into the high stakes profession of neurosurgery. Sometimes, things go wrong, and they have to answer for those mistakes at Morbidity and Mortality conferences, held on Monday mornings, with the chief of surgery and their colleagues. The purpose of these meetings is to make them better surgeons, and prevent those mistakes from happening again. Dr. Tyler Wilson suffers a serious crisis of c In this novel by neurosurgeon and CNN medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta, we get a behind the scenes peek into the high stakes profession of neurosurgery. Sometimes, things go wrong, and they have to answer for those mistakes at Morbidity and Mortality conferences, held on Monday mornings, with the chief of surgery and their colleagues. The purpose of these meetings is to make them better surgeons, and prevent those mistakes from happening again. Dr. Tyler Wilson suffers a serious crisis of confidence after losing a child during an operation. His fellow colleagues include George Villanueva, an NFL football player turned ER doctor; Tina Ridgeway, a meticulous neurosurgeon whose home life is a mess, Sydney Saxena, a driven surgeon who has dreams of taking over for the current chief of surgery, Dr. Harding Hooten, when he retires, and Dr. Sung Park, a Korean neurosurgeon who finds himself facing his own mortality when he learns he has a brain tumor. This is the book that the TNT TV series Monday Mornings was based on. There are a lot of parallels between the TV show and the book, but the book delves much more into their personal lives and back stories, so we really get to see what makes them "tick". There are events in the book that were not featured in the TV series, so if you watched the TV series first, it's not going to spoil any surprises in the book for you. I enjoyed the TV series, and was disappointed to learn that TNT won't be renewing it for a second season, but the book is even better. Still, there were some stories in the book that never made it into the series that would have been interesting to see played out on television, if they had at least been given another chance. I also liked that this story was set in the South East region of Michigan. I'm a Michigan girl, born here and lived her all my life, but I haven't come across a lot of fiction that is set in my home state, so I thought the fact that this book was set here was pretty cool.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Roxanne

    I am a fan of Dr. Gupta and I was pleasantly surprised with the quality of this book. I have worked in the medical field for many years and "mistakes" are nothing new to me. There has never been a better time for patients to be educated and empowered. This work of fiction revolves around several doctors who when necessary are paged for the dreaded "mistake" meeting. I thought each of the five main characters were believable and passionate in their own way to their profession of neurosurgery. Keep I am a fan of Dr. Gupta and I was pleasantly surprised with the quality of this book. I have worked in the medical field for many years and "mistakes" are nothing new to me. There has never been a better time for patients to be educated and empowered. This work of fiction revolves around several doctors who when necessary are paged for the dreaded "mistake" meeting. I thought each of the five main characters were believable and passionate in their own way to their profession of neurosurgery. Keeping that in mind, great doctors can make mistakes. And in this book they do. The best part is that as these ego filled humans, they do have to be accountable for their actions. When the chief of surgery holds the Morbidity and Mortality meeting, they are suppose to be a learning experience for everyone. An opportunity to learn and move forward. What really happens is that the seasoned surgeon who made the mistake is more of a sacrifical lamb offered in exchange for advancing the practice of medicine. As chief of surgery, Dr. Harding L. Hooten says "Everything we do here should be focused on healing". While perfection is the desired end result, nobody can always be perfect. This book read like a fast-paced adventure story filled with moments of compassion, hope, defeat, excitement and fascination. Five deserving gold stars!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    Sadly, Dr. Gupta understands a great deal about medicine but not so much about authentic dialogue or the creation of characters a reader can relate to as being "real people" to which he is able to form attahcments or generate other emotions, be they positive or negative. I was very disappointed that this novel read like a backdated rerun of "ER", right down to the identifiable personalities. Ty is the George Clooneyesque good looking playboy who has a crisis when a young patient dies in his care Sadly, Dr. Gupta understands a great deal about medicine but not so much about authentic dialogue or the creation of characters a reader can relate to as being "real people" to which he is able to form attahcments or generate other emotions, be they positive or negative. I was very disappointed that this novel read like a backdated rerun of "ER", right down to the identifiable personalities. Ty is the George Clooneyesque good looking playboy who has a crisis when a young patient dies in his care,; a father-figure, all knowing head of hospital; and several women characters that are all flat, one-dimensional parodies with storylines that are so trite the readers wants to roll his eyes.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Marcia

    I had high hopes for this due to the subject matter, but the story is badly written, badly edited, or both. We go from looking at a woman's office, then focusing in on her family photos, then focusing on one particular photo of a group of people. The people are looking at a book... oh wait, no they aren't. The antecedent of "they", it turns out, is the woman and her co-worker, not the people in the picture. Was going to push myself to finish, but the characterization of the Korean surgeon followe I had high hopes for this due to the subject matter, but the story is badly written, badly edited, or both. We go from looking at a woman's office, then focusing in on her family photos, then focusing on one particular photo of a group of people. The people are looking at a book... oh wait, no they aren't. The antecedent of "they", it turns out, is the woman and her co-worker, not the people in the picture. Was going to push myself to finish, but the characterization of the Korean surgeon followed by the highlight of another character's incredible beauty... eh, no thanks. I may give one of the author's non-fiction works a try.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dana ****Reads Alot****

    This book kept me up all night wanting to read more. It was truely fascinating and gave me such a more appreciation for doctors and surgeon's. These professionals deal with making a decision in a split second in the matter of life ir death and sometimes its the wrong call or other factors can go terribly wrong and its out of our hands and up to god. I would love to see this book become a television series.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alicia Farmer

    This was horrible. The narrator was horrible. All his men sounded like "bros" (unless they had a generic "Asian" accent) and all the women sounded like breathy seductresses (including the one with a generic "Southern" accent). He made every sentence sound like "Pigs in Space"-level melodrama. Maybe, though I doubt it, with better writing, I could have looked past the narrator. After all, this book is set in Ann Arbor, and I live in Ann Arbor. This book is set at a fictionalized University of Michi This was horrible. The narrator was horrible. All his men sounded like "bros" (unless they had a generic "Asian" accent) and all the women sounded like breathy seductresses (including the one with a generic "Southern" accent). He made every sentence sound like "Pigs in Space"-level melodrama. Maybe, though I doubt it, with better writing, I could have looked past the narrator. After all, this book is set in Ann Arbor, and I live in Ann Arbor. This book is set at a fictionalized University of Michigan Hospital, and I work half a mile from there (not to mention have been there to visit various friends). Plus, I love medical writing. Sadly, this was as dry and unimaginative as could be. I didn't keep a list, but it's the kind of book where every description was cliched and every character stereotyped. I couldn't get past Chapter 5. I've already given more time to it than I should have, so I'll stop here.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    Interesting to read about the struggles that the medical profession face.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Laura (Madsen) McLain

    Very good fictional look at how doctors think, and the current state of medicine in the United States. One quote: When [Dr. Tina Ridgeway] was growing up, doctors were revered in the community. They were healers, civic leaders, wise men. They didn’t make as much money as many specialists these days, but patients treated their words as the gospel. They didn’t Google their symptoms and arrive at the doctor’s only after the supplements or other pop remedies failed. And if something went wrong, it was Very good fictional look at how doctors think, and the current state of medicine in the United States. One quote: When [Dr. Tina Ridgeway] was growing up, doctors were revered in the community. They were healers, civic leaders, wise men. They didn’t make as much money as many specialists these days, but patients treated their words as the gospel. They didn’t Google their symptoms and arrive at the doctor’s only after the supplements or other pop remedies failed. And if something went wrong, it was God’s will, fate, or simply bad luck. Tina couldn’t remember her father facing a single malpractice suit in his forty-year career. Do you wonder why medical care is so expensive? Part of the expense is to pay for ridiculous medical lawsuits. Sure, blatant malpractice or incompetency should be investigated and prosecuted, but doctors are human. Sometimes bad things happen which no one can anticipate or prevent. Doctors do their best but sometimes patients die. The best we can do is to learn from the case and carry on, remembering the lessons and using them to improve the lives of our future patients. Another quote: Almost weekly, it seemed, large studies and new research would raise doubts about long-held beliefs and common medical practices. The efficacy of angioplasty, radical mastectomy, arthroscopic knee surgery, prostate PSA tests and surgery… the list went on and on. Medicine seemed to lurch two steps back for every three it moved forward. Even with the scientific method, [Dr. Sung Park] realized that what doctors knew—really knew—was small, and the limits to medical knowledge were vast. Biological processes don’t always follow the rules. Medicine isn’t like taking your car to the mechanic, when they can plug into the car’s computer and the car tells them it needs its thingamajig replaced. Doctors aren’t infallible. That’s the Pope. Doctors need to piece together clues about the patient’s condition with their knowledge and experience, and sometimes it’s not enough. Sometimes we still can’t figure out what’s wrong until it’s too late. And a final quote: “Live up to your ideals,” [Dr. Ty Wilson] said. More than that, Ty knew in his heart that he was human. Medicine was a human profession. He made mistakes. All doctors made mistakes. The lapses arrived unannounced. They came in broad daylight, hidden from view by hubris or pride or ignorance or stubbornness. They arrived in the shadows, creeping behind inattention or distraction or fatigue. The medical errors were always there, waiting for their moment, waiting for human frailty.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dkattean

    In his first novel, Dr. Gupta gives us a glimpse of the intimate lives - both at work and at play - of a group of elite neurosurgeons at a teaching hospital in southeast Michigan. Though they are from widely disparate backgrounds, what they have in common is extraordinary ambition, compassion, and talent. Every third Monday at 6 a.m., the chief of surgery summons them to Room 311 for the Mortality and Morbidity (M&M) conference, where one unlucky surgeon is forced to explain the decisions leadin In his first novel, Dr. Gupta gives us a glimpse of the intimate lives - both at work and at play - of a group of elite neurosurgeons at a teaching hospital in southeast Michigan. Though they are from widely disparate backgrounds, what they have in common is extraordinary ambition, compassion, and talent. Every third Monday at 6 a.m., the chief of surgery summons them to Room 311 for the Mortality and Morbidity (M&M) conference, where one unlucky surgeon is forced to explain the decisions leading up to a recent less-than-favorable patient outcome. The experience is both a source of shame for the physician in the hot seat and an opportunity to be ridiculed by his peers. It is also, hopefully, a teaching moment. I really wanted to love this book. (I am a big fan of Dr. Gupta's work on CNN and 60 Minutes.) But I only liked it. My main criticism is that he seemed to dumb down the medicine a bit too much. For example, I didn't need to be told that a cerebral aneurysm is "a small blister on the surface of an artery" in the brain. Also, there was a sense of an unfinished ending. I'd spent 300 pages really getting to know this multicultural cadre of surgeons, and though they all had certain likeable qualities, I did come to care about some more than others. To his credit, Dr. Gupta's characters were multidimensional and flawed - in other words, just like real human beings. Being told on the last page that Dr. [one of my favorites] was "out of the picture" was a disappointment. I had expected a more definitive resolution to that particular storyline. Despite its modest flaws, this was an entertaining, fast read that reflected Dr. Gupta's wealth of experience in the field of neurosurgery. I'd be inclined to read more by Dr. Gupta if he represses the urge to explain that a Foley catheter is a tube for drainage of urine.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ginger Williams

    Monday morning is when the surgeons at Chelsea General get together for Morbidity and Mortality reviews - and look out! This is a no-holds-barred session. Gee, if the average surgeon made as many huge errors as this group, I'm never getting near an OR again! This book is messy and unrealistic -- would some of the best surgeons in the world make such basic errors? Including the revered Chief of Surgery operating on the wrong side of the brain? Or a superstar neurosurgeon neglecting to order a basi Monday morning is when the surgeons at Chelsea General get together for Morbidity and Mortality reviews - and look out! This is a no-holds-barred session. Gee, if the average surgeon made as many huge errors as this group, I'm never getting near an OR again! This book is messy and unrealistic -- would some of the best surgeons in the world make such basic errors? Including the revered Chief of Surgery operating on the wrong side of the brain? Or a superstar neurosurgeon neglecting to order a basic blood test before an operation resulting in a child's death? I know it can happen but all in the same hospital within a matter of weeks? If so, these guys need not just Monday morning sessions but sessions every other day of the week too! But the author is a neurosurgeon himself and would have to know what's what -- that's the scary part! Yet- I really enjoyed this book and ended up giving it 4 stars on the Enjoyment Scale. Maybe I love to see the mighty brought low. Maybe because I liked the characters, especially the larger-than-life ER Dr. Villanueva - the 300 pound former pro football player who runs his ER like a high-functioning three ring circus. Finally, how 'bout all those doctors who are also professional writers? How do they have the time? Pretty amazing people!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Helen Dunn

    I can't decide if two stars is generous or just right for this book. The idea of a novel about high powered doctors and medical mysteries/disasters is an interesting one and I think I'd like to read a good book on the subject instead of this rushed one. I know that "Monday Mornings" is being produced as a TV show and knowing that this novel totally reads like a screenplay idea. There are tons of BIG BOLD characters with BIG BOLD traits that they keep telling us about and they are all doing BIG BOL I can't decide if two stars is generous or just right for this book. The idea of a novel about high powered doctors and medical mysteries/disasters is an interesting one and I think I'd like to read a good book on the subject instead of this rushed one. I know that "Monday Mornings" is being produced as a TV show and knowing that this novel totally reads like a screenplay idea. There are tons of BIG BOLD characters with BIG BOLD traits that they keep telling us about and they are all doing BIG BOLD things! Guess what? Did we tell you that they are SUPER SMART and NEVER MAKE MISTAKES but wait? There was a mistake? NO WAY?! Not by one of our team of heros. YAWN. If we learned about the doctors slowly and chose who to like and dislike and then became invested in some of their stories and their patient stories (like we might be able to do over a full TV season) this would probably have really entertained me. Instead I just found it annoying. Especially in the final quarter when I was actually laughing out loud at some of the ridiculous (and completely predictable) turns in the plot. OK, as I type I am revising my review down to a single star. Verdict: pretty terrible as a book but I am going to watch the episode of the TV I have taped to see if it's any better. I think it really does have some potential as a rival to Grey's Anatomy.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Pr Latta

    Gupta is the Chief Medical Correspondent for CNN and author of Cheating Death (a non-fiction title). In this book, he uses fiction to explore the realities of seeking excellence in medical care in hospitals - but in a television drama format. Monday Mornings refers to the "M&M," the Morbidity and Mortality review conference where the surgeons at the fictional Chelsea Hospital air their mistakes and hopefully learn from them. Gupta gives a clear picture of good intentions and how good doctors can Gupta is the Chief Medical Correspondent for CNN and author of Cheating Death (a non-fiction title). In this book, he uses fiction to explore the realities of seeking excellence in medical care in hospitals - but in a television drama format. Monday Mornings refers to the "M&M," the Morbidity and Mortality review conference where the surgeons at the fictional Chelsea Hospital air their mistakes and hopefully learn from them. Gupta gives a clear picture of good intentions and how good doctors can still make mistakes: the crass, crude ER doctor as a magical diagnostician whose Achilles heel is an emotional reaction (and his horrible lifestyle); the Wunderkind neurosurgeon who misses an underlying condition (that frankly, I suspect the anesthesiologist would also have picked up); the surgeon whose whole career has been built on creating a better environment so fewer errors will occur -- and then it happens to him; the driven immigrant surgeon who finds that hard work and preparation aren't everything; the focused surgeon who achieves her dream and realizes there is even more. Not great literature but a good message and a quick read: probably 3 1/2 stars -- I did enjoy the book, just felt it a bit light for someone of Gupta's stature.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rick Bavera

    Being a "fan" of Sanjay Gupta's reporting on CNN, I looked forward to reading his book, Monday Mornings. I found the story of Chelsea General Hospital, set in Michigan, to be one that held my attention. I found the story of Monday mornings, where the surgeons talked about cases that had problems, and learned from those problems, an educational one for me and for the characters. There are five main characters in the book, surgeons, who we come to care about. One, Dr. George Villanueva, is the one Being a "fan" of Sanjay Gupta's reporting on CNN, I looked forward to reading his book, Monday Mornings. I found the story of Chelsea General Hospital, set in Michigan, to be one that held my attention. I found the story of Monday mornings, where the surgeons talked about cases that had problems, and learned from those problems, an educational one for me and for the characters. There are five main characters in the book, surgeons, who we come to care about. One, Dr. George Villanueva, is the one we come to learn the most about, and therefore come to care the most about. I found myself wanting to care about the other characters as much, but the story didn't really let me get to know them as well. Also, the focus was almost entirely on the doctors at the hospital, as if they were the only ones truly involved in the care of the patients. It would have been good to have more appearances by nurses, aides, and other staff, to make things more realistic. Overall, though, I found the tale a satisfying one, and did come to care about what happened to the cast of characters.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Characters don't just clench their jaw, they flex their masseter muscle...it isn't just nerves causing nausea but epinephrine coursing through veins and constricting blood flow to the stomach...this is my kind of book! Written by a doctor it satisfied my nerdy side as well as my literary side. While there really isn't a meaty story to this book, it is filled with interesting characters in the medical field who show their humanity with mistakes, regrets and struggles that are nicely tied up by the Characters don't just clench their jaw, they flex their masseter muscle...it isn't just nerves causing nausea but epinephrine coursing through veins and constricting blood flow to the stomach...this is my kind of book! Written by a doctor it satisfied my nerdy side as well as my literary side. While there really isn't a meaty story to this book, it is filled with interesting characters in the medical field who show their humanity with mistakes, regrets and struggles that are nicely tied up by the end of the book. Great read!

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