counter create hit Education Automation: Freeing the Scholar to Return to His Studies - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Education Automation: Freeing the Scholar to Return to His Studies

Availability: Ready to download

R. Buckminster Fuller (1895a "1983) was an architect, engineer, geometrician, cartographer, philosopher, futurist, inventor of the famous geodesic dome, and one of the most brilliant thinkers of his time. For more than five decades, he set forth his comprehensive perspective on the world's problems in numerous essays, which offer an illuminating insight into the intellectu R. Buckminster Fuller (1895a "1983) was an architect, engineer, geometrician, cartographer, philosopher, futurist, inventor of the famous geodesic dome, and one of the most brilliant thinkers of his time. For more than five decades, he set forth his comprehensive perspective on the world's problems in numerous essays, which offer an illuminating insight into the intellectual universe of this "renaissance man." These texts remain surprisingly topical even today, decades after their initial publication. While Fuller wrote the works in the 1960's and 1970's, they could not be more timely: like desperately needed time-capsules of wisdom for the critical moment he foresaw, and in which we find ourselves. Long out of print, they are now being published again, together with commentary by Jaime Snyder, the grandson of Buckminster Fuller. Designed for a new generation of readers, Snyder prepared these editions with supplementary material providing background on the texts, factual updates, and interpretation of his visionary ideas. A biography of Buckminster Fuller's "thought development," Ideas and Integrities presents an intimate self-portrait of the experiences and discoveries behind his groundbreaking ideas and inventions. Through in-depth essays like "Total Thinking," "Design for Survival a " Plus," and "The Comprehensive Man," spanning the period from his earliest writings to the invention of the geodesic dome and his explosion onto the world stage, he delivers a powerful manifesto for the comprehensive design revolution he had championed: "To make man a success on earth.... we must design our way to positive effectiveness." Buckminster Fuller's prophetic 1962 book Education Automation brilliantly anticipated the need to rethink learning in light of a dawning revolution in informational technology a " "upcoming major world industry." Along with other essays on education, including "Breaking the Shell of Permitted Ignorance," "Children: the True Scientists" and "Mistake Mystique" this volume presents a powerful approach for preparing ourselves to face epochal changes on spaceship earth: "whether we are going to make it or not... is really up to each one of us; it is not something we can delegate to the politicians a " what kind of world are you really going to have?"


Compare
Ads Banner

R. Buckminster Fuller (1895a "1983) was an architect, engineer, geometrician, cartographer, philosopher, futurist, inventor of the famous geodesic dome, and one of the most brilliant thinkers of his time. For more than five decades, he set forth his comprehensive perspective on the world's problems in numerous essays, which offer an illuminating insight into the intellectu R. Buckminster Fuller (1895a "1983) was an architect, engineer, geometrician, cartographer, philosopher, futurist, inventor of the famous geodesic dome, and one of the most brilliant thinkers of his time. For more than five decades, he set forth his comprehensive perspective on the world's problems in numerous essays, which offer an illuminating insight into the intellectual universe of this "renaissance man." These texts remain surprisingly topical even today, decades after their initial publication. While Fuller wrote the works in the 1960's and 1970's, they could not be more timely: like desperately needed time-capsules of wisdom for the critical moment he foresaw, and in which we find ourselves. Long out of print, they are now being published again, together with commentary by Jaime Snyder, the grandson of Buckminster Fuller. Designed for a new generation of readers, Snyder prepared these editions with supplementary material providing background on the texts, factual updates, and interpretation of his visionary ideas. A biography of Buckminster Fuller's "thought development," Ideas and Integrities presents an intimate self-portrait of the experiences and discoveries behind his groundbreaking ideas and inventions. Through in-depth essays like "Total Thinking," "Design for Survival a " Plus," and "The Comprehensive Man," spanning the period from his earliest writings to the invention of the geodesic dome and his explosion onto the world stage, he delivers a powerful manifesto for the comprehensive design revolution he had championed: "To make man a success on earth.... we must design our way to positive effectiveness." Buckminster Fuller's prophetic 1962 book Education Automation brilliantly anticipated the need to rethink learning in light of a dawning revolution in informational technology a " "upcoming major world industry." Along with other essays on education, including "Breaking the Shell of Permitted Ignorance," "Children: the True Scientists" and "Mistake Mystique" this volume presents a powerful approach for preparing ourselves to face epochal changes on spaceship earth: "whether we are going to make it or not... is really up to each one of us; it is not something we can delegate to the politicians a " what kind of world are you really going to have?"

30 review for Education Automation: Freeing the Scholar to Return to His Studies

  1. 5 out of 5

    Willy Marz Thiessam

    He's not a "social reformer" he says, but a "new former". What this means is that he swore at some point in the 1920s that he would do some thing practical instead of taking what he saw as a theoretical political position. This book is his homage to his avoidance strategy. He imagines in this short work that if all people are educated then no one would do the wrong thing. We would do the right thing, the technically and scientifically correct thing, because we would know what to do. He endeavours He's not a "social reformer" he says, but a "new former". What this means is that he swore at some point in the 1920s that he would do some thing practical instead of taking what he saw as a theoretical political position. This book is his homage to his avoidance strategy. He imagines in this short work that if all people are educated then no one would do the wrong thing. We would do the right thing, the technically and scientifically correct thing, because we would know what to do. He endeavours to posit this as his answer to socialism, Marxism and Communism. You have to step back and realize this is the cold war when he is writing. To be safe, mentioning communism or socialism meant in the USA you had to condemn it. This safety though stood in the way of making some technical progress just in case it seemed too socialist, which for a practical guy such as Fuller he had to find a way around the ideological blockade on progressively scientific and technical advanced development. So he dispenses with ideology, planning and anything that seems to say we need to work together instead of being rugged individualists. So he says we will naturally want to do the right thing with each other if we had a good education. No particular ideology would be necessary. If you have heard the argument before its not surprising. Dickens made the argument almost exactly the same in his numerous sentimental novels. If people were just nicer to each other, more considerate and understood each other better, then we wouldn't need any more social reform than that. All the good will and education in the world will not make Fuller's argument hold water. We need to be better organized and recognize that some advanced planning processes on a mass even global scale are necessary to modern life. Call it what you will it is more than mere good will and education can provide. Still Fuller was a genius and his visions of technical advance and the future possibilities of science are both poetic and practical. Its hard not to find his optimism charming.

  2. 5 out of 5

    S. Wilson

    This book was created from the transcript of Buckminster Fuller's presentation to the Southern Illinois University's planning committee in 1961, after being invited as part of a group of experienced professionals called on as consultants for future development of the university. Reading anything by Fuller can be a heady, almost trippy experience; Fuller was an inventor and innovator whose work was always immersed in his unyielding optimism for mankind's potential and future evolution, and any pro This book was created from the transcript of Buckminster Fuller's presentation to the Southern Illinois University's planning committee in 1961, after being invited as part of a group of experienced professionals called on as consultants for future development of the university. Reading anything by Fuller can be a heady, almost trippy experience; Fuller was an inventor and innovator whose work was always immersed in his unyielding optimism for mankind's potential and future evolution, and any project undertaken by him always pointed towards this Utopian inevitability. Education Automation is no different, as it's main focus is on Fuller's wide-eyed predictions of how education would eventually become the country's (and world's) foremost business venture, with fully-funded advanced (and even lifetime) education to fulfill society's needs as the global labor-based economy gives way to a idea-based economy. It's easy enough to dismiss some of Fuller's predictions and theories as wishful thinking or delusional prognostication, if for no other reason than the real world's inability - or unwillingness - to follow the trail laid out by him. However, his prescient ability to lay out an archaic version of today's internet, and accurately describe mankind's evolutionary path to the present (complete with historically accurate examples) that leads him to believe in the brightness of it's future, are strokes of genius that cannot be ignored, even if they do feel as if seen through rose-colored glasses. If you are new to Buckminster Fuller, this is a great introduction to the man's thought process and vision, although even in this slim volume his explanations can be occasionally dense and convoluted. Be prepared to be more depressed than inspired, however, as comparing his hopeful vision of yesterday's tomorrow still bares little resemblance to the unflinching reality of today.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Leect27

    Just completed the last chapter of this book and it led me to the next book "Synergetic" to find out more about how the mind work. It made me realize what a big stage "Bucky" was really looking at. That we humans are all bickering with each other on this "seemingly limited space with scarce resources" place called Spaceship Earth, while we are not even a speck in this huge universe. So we need to be a Comprehensive Anticipatory Design Scientist and see the big picture of how the world works. We Just completed the last chapter of this book and it led me to the next book "Synergetic" to find out more about how the mind work. It made me realize what a big stage "Bucky" was really looking at. That we humans are all bickering with each other on this "seemingly limited space with scarce resources" place called Spaceship Earth, while we are not even a speck in this huge universe. So we need to be a Comprehensive Anticipatory Design Scientist and see the big picture of how the world works. We are at this juncture where we need to wake up and start to work together to make the world work for 100% humanity. When that happens, our world may expand even beyond Earth. It also taught me a lot of my children. That our children are actually here to teach us, not the other way round. They are born genius but are being "de-geniused" by us adults. And we (also genuises) might have sacrificed our abilities in the process of growing up. so now we need to provide them a safe space and make it ok for them to make lots of mistakes and encourage them to learn and correct themselves without invalidation (Mistake Mystique). We are also a role model in our words, tone, emotions for our kids, so we need to be responsible. Our children have the ability to absorb and learn a tremendous amount of information from the TV, but there's now too much toxic on the TV and not enough comprehensive learning content. Also, school may not be the ideal environment for study and comprehensive learning, but a place for social experience. All the above and more, made me reflect on how I have played my role as a father, and how true it is about my kids being a genius. It created an awareness for me, and I want to find out more about how to do better. Let us provide a conducive environment for our kids to have comprehensive learning so they will one day create a better place for everyone.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Boris

    A brilliant visionary book. Still relevant today, as we've not fully absorbed the brilliant recommendation: 1) Find the best ways to present a topic 2) Find the best person to present the topic 3) Record the presentation 4) Show it to all the students Why should crappy teachers have to figure out a way to present a topic, and then stumble through the presentation, repeat the lesson several times in a day, and repeat the performance every year? Do what the book recommends, and everyone will be better A brilliant visionary book. Still relevant today, as we've not fully absorbed the brilliant recommendation: 1) Find the best ways to present a topic 2) Find the best person to present the topic 3) Record the presentation 4) Show it to all the students Why should crappy teachers have to figure out a way to present a topic, and then stumble through the presentation, repeat the lesson several times in a day, and repeat the performance every year? Do what the book recommends, and everyone will be better off!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michael Gallagher

    It’s very interesting and very, very dated. Fuller spends maybe 20 pages of the 85-page manuscript actually talking about education, and everything else is weird tangents and him showing off his Big Beefy Brain. His ideas on remote learning are very prescient, but too much of this lecture is heresay, personal opinion and just Fuller using big words. Still, there are some good ideas lodged in it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Macfrickins

    Buckminister was for sure greate teacher. So he decided to write a little piece on education. Could be written more about education, but after understood his thinking, it's asking for impossible. He is often freestyling even in his books.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michael Jay

    Fuller gives the reader a chance to see how systemic design and an overarching vision can help add dimensions to one's perception and problem-solving ability, in the class, and in one's daily life. I appreciate the chance to view learning from Fuller's vantage.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Vinay

    Read this on openlibrary.org, A visionary document, some of the things have actually come true ...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Norman Fellows

    This book was first published in December 1962 when I was 16 and doing 'O' level studies at a comprehensive school in Wolverhampton. However, I did not read it until August 1996 when I was 49 and doing doctoral studies at the OU. Why did a book I had not read change me? Briefly, because, in August 1967, when I was studying architecture, I received a copy of Cedric Price's Potteries Thinkbelt study, but something I did not know then was that it was a response to the challenge originated by Buckmins This book was first published in December 1962 when I was 16 and doing 'O' level studies at a comprehensive school in Wolverhampton. However, I did not read it until August 1996 when I was 49 and doing doctoral studies at the OU. Why did a book I had not read change me? Briefly, because, in August 1967, when I was studying architecture, I received a copy of Cedric Price's Potteries Thinkbelt study, but something I did not know then was that it was a response to the challenge originated by Buckminster Fuller in Education Automation, namely, that the world's universities should invest in the problem of how to make the world work for 100% of humanity. This challenge had been ignored in the UK, prompting Price, famous for Joan Littlewood's Fun Palace, to design another early entry project, this time in the field of social policy. Further, in August 1996, I learned that Price's proposal that advanced education should become the new prime industry was a re-think of Fuller's original conception. Thus Education Automation is a book that changed Cedric Price before it changed me. Why? Ultimately, because it frees us all to return to our studies.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    This is my second of many of Fuller's books I'll be reading. I continue to be impressed at his vision, and what he was able to articulate in the early sixties regarding education and technology is notable. He was optimistic in his timelines, and that much of what he envisioned took longer to be realized.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Grace O'Keeffe

    Absolutely amazing!!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    A rambling but lucid presentation to the folks creating SIU's new campus. Insightful on a broad range of education topics, including an appeal for more comprehensive anticipatory design folks.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joel Spitz

    Like most of Fullers books, it was a great read. He was a visionary, full of great ideas and concepts that turned out to be true before they were accepted as such.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Reynaldo Vargas

    :)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Chee

  16. 4 out of 5

    Pcgowan

  17. 5 out of 5

    jons

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

  19. 5 out of 5

    Atao

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shaik

  21. 4 out of 5

    Medard

  22. 4 out of 5

    Duncan

  23. 5 out of 5

    Carl Gettleman

  24. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Cushing

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

  26. 5 out of 5

    Adam D. Morris

  27. 4 out of 5

    Liquidlasagna

  28. 5 out of 5

    Miguel Amaral

  29. 4 out of 5

    AE

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michael Clark

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.