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From the Golden Age of comics a special volume collecting the early individual adventures of the members of the Justice Society of America from ALL STAR COMICS #1 and #2 at a special price! While ALL STAR COMICS #3 was unquestionably one of comics' greatest milestones, issues #1 and #2 were also impressive in their own right. Virtually every founding member of the (yet-to-d From the Golden Age of comics a special volume collecting the early individual adventures of the members of the Justice Society of America from ALL STAR COMICS #1 and #2 at a special price! While ALL STAR COMICS #3 was unquestionably one of comics' greatest milestones, issues #1 and #2 were also impressive in their own right. Virtually every founding member of the (yet-to-debut) original JSA lineup minus Superman and Batman was represented in these individual adventures, and most of the stories are written and drawn by their original creators. ALL STAR ARCHIVES Vol. 0 is the perfect preface to the 11-volume complete reprinting of every JSA adventure from the Golden Age. Now the entire body of these "All Star" exploits is in print and available to all those who were there when they were published the first time around or wish they had been!


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From the Golden Age of comics a special volume collecting the early individual adventures of the members of the Justice Society of America from ALL STAR COMICS #1 and #2 at a special price! While ALL STAR COMICS #3 was unquestionably one of comics' greatest milestones, issues #1 and #2 were also impressive in their own right. Virtually every founding member of the (yet-to-d From the Golden Age of comics a special volume collecting the early individual adventures of the members of the Justice Society of America from ALL STAR COMICS #1 and #2 at a special price! While ALL STAR COMICS #3 was unquestionably one of comics' greatest milestones, issues #1 and #2 were also impressive in their own right. Virtually every founding member of the (yet-to-debut) original JSA lineup minus Superman and Batman was represented in these individual adventures, and most of the stories are written and drawn by their original creators. ALL STAR ARCHIVES Vol. 0 is the perfect preface to the 11-volume complete reprinting of every JSA adventure from the Golden Age. Now the entire body of these "All Star" exploits is in print and available to all those who were there when they were published the first time around or wish they had been!

56 review for All Star Comics Archives, Vol. 0

  1. 5 out of 5

    TK

    I'm a sucker for the history of comics. There's something so fascinating about the comics from this era. I love watching fashion, language and themes change as characters walk, run and fly through the decades. The 40's in particular have a distinct vision of what's right, what's wrong and what the future holds. At the same time the golden era also chooses to completely ignore whole realities and experiences. These stories come from a very limited perspective and it's impossible to ignore the bla I'm a sucker for the history of comics. There's something so fascinating about the comics from this era. I love watching fashion, language and themes change as characters walk, run and fly through the decades. The 40's in particular have a distinct vision of what's right, what's wrong and what the future holds. At the same time the golden era also chooses to completely ignore whole realities and experiences. These stories come from a very limited perspective and it's impossible to ignore the blatant sexism and racism bleeding through the pages. Rating stories from this era are a struggle, do you accept them at face value understanding the period they originate from? Or do you hold them to the standards of the modern era? Perhaps it's a combination of both? Reading these stories lets me wonder if the world has really changed all that much? How much of our storytelling is still limited to a handful of perspectives? Are we still afraid of the same things? Do we still have the same fantasies and dreams?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dimitris Papastergiou

    If you like any of the stories here, you're either a time traveling kid from the 40s or you were a kid reading these back then and you like remembering what it was to read silly stories. If you like any of the stories here, you're either a time traveling kid from the 40s or you were a kid reading these back then and you like remembering what it was to read silly stories.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    All Star Comics was a series that DC Comics introduced in 1940, designed to showcase various characters who didn't have a series of their own. (E.g. Batman in Detective Comics or Superman in Adventure Comics). The series included characters like The Spectre, The Sandman, Hawkman, Flash, and Green Lantern. Some of these characters, of course, went on to become DC staples. This volume includes all stories from the first two issues of All Star Comics, from the Summer and Fall 1940 editions. The storie All Star Comics was a series that DC Comics introduced in 1940, designed to showcase various characters who didn't have a series of their own. (E.g. Batman in Detective Comics or Superman in Adventure Comics). The series included characters like The Spectre, The Sandman, Hawkman, Flash, and Green Lantern. Some of these characters, of course, went on to become DC staples. This volume includes all stories from the first two issues of All Star Comics, from the Summer and Fall 1940 editions. The stories are all fairly entertaining and it's fun to see some of these characters in their earliest adventures. The stories may seem a bit dated and silly, but the artwork is gorgeous and the colors in this printing bright.

  4. 5 out of 5

    M.

    All-Star Comics is best known for being the title where the first super-team in comics - the Justice Society of America - made its debut. That was the third issue of the series. This book contains the first two issues, which, it turns out, were published as a test run to see which rising stars in the DC Comics universe should graduate to solo titles of their own. The stories in this volume are truly from the earliest days of super-hero comics, before the idea of a cohesive universe took hold and All-Star Comics is best known for being the title where the first super-team in comics - the Justice Society of America - made its debut. That was the third issue of the series. This book contains the first two issues, which, it turns out, were published as a test run to see which rising stars in the DC Comics universe should graduate to solo titles of their own. The stories in this volume are truly from the earliest days of super-hero comics, before the idea of a cohesive universe took hold and when the characters were not seen as intellectual property that had to be carefully managed. They are full of plot holes and often rushed at the end, but it is still a thrill to see the formative years of characters that would thrive in the Golden Age of comics and be revived, celebrated and grow in ages to come. The standouts in this book for me were the Spectre tales. They were drawn nicely by Bernard Baily and written by Jerry Siegel (one of the two creators of a certain mild-mannered reporter from Smallville, Kansas). Siegel's stories showed the most imagination, verve and thought. I see the roots of how the Spectre became the fearsome character he did in later years, and can't wait to tackle his Archive edition. Siegel also wrote the "Red, White and Blue" stories in this volume, and those were also quite enjoyable and nicely plotted. Having "known" many of these characters since the 1970s, it was quite a pleasure to see them in their earliest days.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    This archive volume was printed after the 55 issues starring the Justice Society were collected. The first 2 issues of All-Star Comics, they featured a collection of 7-9 page stories starring many of DC's and AA's less popular heroes, such as Flash, Hour-Man, Spectre, Green Lantern, Hawkmam, Johnny Thunder, Sandman, and some strips previously unknown to me: Ultra-Man, Red White & Blue, and Biff Bronson. These stories were to gauge interest in solo titles for the heroes, and the editors actually s This archive volume was printed after the 55 issues starring the Justice Society were collected. The first 2 issues of All-Star Comics, they featured a collection of 7-9 page stories starring many of DC's and AA's less popular heroes, such as Flash, Hour-Man, Spectre, Green Lantern, Hawkmam, Johnny Thunder, Sandman, and some strips previously unknown to me: Ultra-Man, Red White & Blue, and Biff Bronson. These stories were to gauge interest in solo titles for the heroes, and the editors actually solicited from the readers who they wanted to see in their own series. DC reprinted those editorials, as well as two-page ads that highlighted many of the DC anthology books these characters appeared in. There is also a two page prose science fiction story by Elizabeth Gaines, neice of MC Gaines, who published All-American comics with DC publisher Donenfield. Most of these stories are pretty tame stuff with the usual crude Golden Age art but they are fast paced tales and the artists generally seem to have fun with what they do. There is art by Joe Kubert and Bill Finger as well as Bernard Bailey. Great stuff of you're interested in comics history and early depictions of DC's JSA members.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tony Calder

    I have long been a fan of the JSA, and this 12-volume series (from 0-11) reprints their Golden Age adventures, from issue 1 in 1940 through to issue 57 in 1951, which was the final issue before the series was revived in 1976. This first volume in the series reprints the first two issues of All-Star Comics (each one 68 pages). The JSA doesn't appear in either of these issues. These issues contain stories of individual characters, many of whom would form the starting roster of the JSA. To readers of I have long been a fan of the JSA, and this 12-volume series (from 0-11) reprints their Golden Age adventures, from issue 1 in 1940 through to issue 57 in 1951, which was the final issue before the series was revived in 1976. This first volume in the series reprints the first two issues of All-Star Comics (each one 68 pages). The JSA doesn't appear in either of these issues. These issues contain stories of individual characters, many of whom would form the starting roster of the JSA. To readers of modern era comics, the stories and artwork may seem quite basic, and some of the characters may be unfamiliar even to those who are fans of Earth 2, as they were to me, but most of the featured characters should be familiar - Flash, Green Lantern, Spectre, Hour-Man, Sandman, and Hawkman. Overall, this is a fascinating look at the early era of superhero comics.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Schmitt

    I've been a fan of the Golden Age DC Superheroes since the day I discovered them, all living out their days on Earth 2. Dunno why that particular group struck such a chord with me, but they did...especially the group that would ultimately form The Justice Society of America. This book reprints the first two issues of All-Star Comics before the JSA took over that title. The stories are short (anywhere from six to ten pages each), crudely drawn, and complete within themselves (multiple-entry stories I've been a fan of the Golden Age DC Superheroes since the day I discovered them, all living out their days on Earth 2. Dunno why that particular group struck such a chord with me, but they did...especially the group that would ultimately form The Justice Society of America. This book reprints the first two issues of All-Star Comics before the JSA took over that title. The stories are short (anywhere from six to ten pages each), crudely drawn, and complete within themselves (multiple-entry stories spanning month and sometimes even different titles were still in the future). But they're quaint. Definitely a fun read for the DC historian in me. Now, on to Archive collections 1 and 2 (All three Christmas 2014 gifts from my son)...let the meetings begin!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    Written nearly 2 decades before my own reading of DC's Silver Age Comics, these 1940 issues are a real treat to watch earlier incarnations of characters who would survive and be transformed by the 1960's. Also included are strips which didn't outlast the 40's, some with good reason. Still, a worthwhile glimpse at the barely pre-war era in the U.S. and how violent the comics of that era could be. Written nearly 2 decades before my own reading of DC's Silver Age Comics, these 1940 issues are a real treat to watch earlier incarnations of characters who would survive and be transformed by the 1960's. Also included are strips which didn't outlast the 40's, some with good reason. Still, a worthwhile glimpse at the barely pre-war era in the U.S. and how violent the comics of that era could be.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Better than average Golden Age fare, as long as you don't expect anything more than that. This volume reprints All Star Comics 1-2; the look at All Star prior to the formation of the JSA is worth the time spent reading the book. Better than average Golden Age fare, as long as you don't expect anything more than that. This volume reprints All Star Comics 1-2; the look at All Star prior to the formation of the JSA is worth the time spent reading the book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Thurston

    historically interesting....but a tough read.....early comics were still evolving.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Adam Reed

  12. 5 out of 5

    Steven Wilson

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jack Holt

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lukas

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bookworm Meg

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Petretich

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rex

  18. 4 out of 5

    Donald Kirch

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tanu

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mik

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tym

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chris Wallace

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tsuna

  24. 4 out of 5

    Adam

  25. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Harr

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nicolas

  27. 5 out of 5

    Reyna

  28. 5 out of 5

    Trevor Kidd

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

  30. 4 out of 5

    Steven

  31. 4 out of 5

    Keith

  32. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  33. 4 out of 5

    Damon Williams

  34. 5 out of 5

    Joshlynn

  35. 4 out of 5

    Jack

  36. 5 out of 5

    Wt

  37. 5 out of 5

    David

  38. 5 out of 5

    Timothy

  39. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  40. 5 out of 5

    Brent

  41. 5 out of 5

    James Hamilton

  42. 4 out of 5

    Richard Mellaart

  43. 4 out of 5

    Shubham

  44. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

  45. 4 out of 5

    Ted Kord

  46. 5 out of 5

    Rowan

  47. 5 out of 5

    John

  48. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

  49. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

  50. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

  51. 5 out of 5

    Jason Manford

  52. 5 out of 5

    Yinzadi

  53. 5 out of 5

    Joe

  54. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  55. 4 out of 5

    Robert Jaz

  56. 4 out of 5

    Cunyean

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