counter create hit High Steaks: Why and How to Eat Less Meat - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

High Steaks: Why and How to Eat Less Meat

Availability: Ready to download

Each year the average North American ingests well over two hundred pounds of animal protein. Meanwhile the global appetite for meat has increased dramatically. But feeding our meat addiction comes at tremendous cost. Mainting our current level of consumption is ecologically impossible in the longterm and undermines our personal health and community well-being. High Steaks d Each year the average North American ingests well over two hundred pounds of animal protein. Meanwhile the global appetite for meat has increased dramatically. But feeding our meat addiction comes at tremendous cost. Mainting our current level of consumption is ecologically impossible in the longterm and undermines our personal health and community well-being. High Steaks documents the disastrous consequences of modern large-scale industrial meat production and excessive consumption, including: The loss of vast tracts of arable land and fresh water to intensive livestock production Increased pollution, loss of biodiversity, deforestation, and accelerating climate change The environmental and health impacts of too much animal fat, and of antibiotics and other chemicals in our food. Timely and compelling, this powerful book offers a modest, commonsense approach to a serious problem, suggesting strategies for all of us to cut back on our consumption of animal products and ensure that the meat we do consume is produced in a sustainable, ecologically responsible manner. At the same time, High Steaks describes progressive food policy shifts that will discourage factory farming and encourage people to eat in ways that support ecosystems and personal health. Eleanor Boyle has been teaching and writing for twenty-five years, with a focus on food systems and their social, environmental, and health consequences. As well as working with organizations aiming for better food policy, she holds an MSc in food policy and is an instructor at the Centre for Sustainability at the University of British Columbia.


Compare

Each year the average North American ingests well over two hundred pounds of animal protein. Meanwhile the global appetite for meat has increased dramatically. But feeding our meat addiction comes at tremendous cost. Mainting our current level of consumption is ecologically impossible in the longterm and undermines our personal health and community well-being. High Steaks d Each year the average North American ingests well over two hundred pounds of animal protein. Meanwhile the global appetite for meat has increased dramatically. But feeding our meat addiction comes at tremendous cost. Mainting our current level of consumption is ecologically impossible in the longterm and undermines our personal health and community well-being. High Steaks documents the disastrous consequences of modern large-scale industrial meat production and excessive consumption, including: The loss of vast tracts of arable land and fresh water to intensive livestock production Increased pollution, loss of biodiversity, deforestation, and accelerating climate change The environmental and health impacts of too much animal fat, and of antibiotics and other chemicals in our food. Timely and compelling, this powerful book offers a modest, commonsense approach to a serious problem, suggesting strategies for all of us to cut back on our consumption of animal products and ensure that the meat we do consume is produced in a sustainable, ecologically responsible manner. At the same time, High Steaks describes progressive food policy shifts that will discourage factory farming and encourage people to eat in ways that support ecosystems and personal health. Eleanor Boyle has been teaching and writing for twenty-five years, with a focus on food systems and their social, environmental, and health consequences. As well as working with organizations aiming for better food policy, she holds an MSc in food policy and is an instructor at the Centre for Sustainability at the University of British Columbia.

32 review for High Steaks: Why and How to Eat Less Meat

  1. 4 out of 5

    Peacegal

    The advocacy group Vegan Outreach distributes an ingenious booklet called “Even if You Like Meat.” This item, which has quickly become one of the group’s most popular, asks readers not to become strict vegans but rather to modify their diets to include less meat and eggs. Convincing many people to eat less meat actually winds up sparing more animals and environmental damage than convincing just one or two people to become vegans. That’s the premise behind this book. It’s not about becoming a veg The advocacy group Vegan Outreach distributes an ingenious booklet called “Even if You Like Meat.” This item, which has quickly become one of the group’s most popular, asks readers not to become strict vegans but rather to modify their diets to include less meat and eggs. Convincing many people to eat less meat actually winds up sparing more animals and environmental damage than convincing just one or two people to become vegans. That’s the premise behind this book. It’s not about becoming a vegan, it’s about eating fewer animal products, and being more mindful of the sources when we do choose animal-based foods. While this book is primarily about the environmental impact of our current to-the-hilt style of meat production, animal welfare is also a topic of concern. Boyle’s approach to the animal ethics issue is best summed up by this passage in the book: Most of us feel it is morally acceptable to use animals for some human purposes. But we also hope that chickens, pigs, and cows are not subjected to unnecessary discomfort or suffering. When we eat more meat or buy it more cheaply than can be produced kindly, we violate these hopes. Most Americans feel some compassion for animals and a great many self-identify as animal lovers. Simply put, the manner in which the vast majority of agricultural animals are treated violates the mores of most people. Throughout the book, Boyle visits numerous farms raising animals in a way that most omnivores would find more acceptable. These farms work with the natural surroundings rather than plundering them, and allow animals to graze and roam rather than caging them in barren pens and feedlots. To be a small organic farmer in the modern world is truly to be David going against Goliath. A farm with 40 turkeys, for instance, has a tough going against a CAFO with 40,000. However, from early childhood most people have a sense that the small farm is the natural way of things, so agribusiness has fought back by attempting to deceive consumers that things like Tyson chicken wings come from Old MacDonald’s farm. You will see images of old red barns and silos on packages of factory-farmed animal products. You will see words like “natural” (which actually means nothing at all). The current buzzword you will hear from factory farm defenders is “family farm.” Even this bucolic phrase is one you may have to watch out for: Some agribusiness executives refer to themselves in public (and to the government) as family farmers, though they raise tens of thousands of animals in factories. And some family farmers stay in business by working with (or for) integrators on various aspects of livestock production; in the process, they give up considerable control of what used to be their own operation. Contract growing is not the same as independent farming. There’s another big difference between true family farmers and factory farms: family farms are proud to show off their operations. They want to invite customers onto their property. They feel the best advertising is simply showing how things are done. Contrast this with the factory farms, which have been passing a flurry of “ag gag” laws that actually make it illegal to photograph an animal production facility. The reason, of course, is that Big Ag knows it has something to hide and even the most devoted meat eaters are unlikely to be impressed by their abused animals and huge ponds of liquid manure. While there are plenty of reasons to eat less of it, the author acknowledges that meat is everywhere. When you’re dining at mainstream eateries, it can be hard to find a sandwich or even a salad that doesn't have meat and/or cheese. That’s why the book offers up some strategies and biographical examples to reduce meat consumption. Lightening up on the chicken, beef and ham might involve trying new foods, learning new recipes or adapting some of your favorite standby dishes to use less or no meat. It might have you avoiding fast-food places and instead choosing a local restaurant that serves hamburgers made from local, pasture-raised cows. When shopping, it is just as easy to grab the organic milk, the cage-free eggs, and the box of veggieburgers, which are normally sold right alongside their factory-farmed counterparts. Most of all, Boyle emphasizes that “meat-eaters, vegans, and everyone else can be on the same team.” Meat-eaters who relentlessly bingo non-meat eaters and vegans who are on an “all or nothing” crusade are equally unhelpful. While we may disagree about the place of animals in our society, we’re all against factory farming. We all want to see a reduction senseless animal cruelty and environmental destruction. We all want to experience better overall health. All of this can be achieved by consuming less meat, and being mindful of where our food comes from.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Lozano

    The book's emphasis is on reducing consumption of animal products, and there is little talk of eliminating their use altogether. The author is enamored with the concept of organically produced 'happy meat', and I think it undermines the rest of her message. It's a good book for people who see no problem whatsoever with eating animal products. But if you understand the environmental and health consequences of an animal product based diet, I'd look for a more substantive book. The book's emphasis is on reducing consumption of animal products, and there is little talk of eliminating their use altogether. The author is enamored with the concept of organically produced 'happy meat', and I think it undermines the rest of her message. It's a good book for people who see no problem whatsoever with eating animal products. But if you understand the environmental and health consequences of an animal product based diet, I'd look for a more substantive book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Eric

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nayla

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bear

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tanner Legasse

  7. 4 out of 5

    Trevor

  8. 4 out of 5

    Heidi Madden

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ruqaiyah

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  12. 5 out of 5

    Matt Berkowitz

  13. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

  14. 4 out of 5

    Travis Martin

  15. 5 out of 5

    Buried In Print

  16. 5 out of 5

    Clarissa

  17. 4 out of 5

    CBSD Library

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nikki Mokshikki

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jessicanna

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Browne

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dina

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rachelle Ternier

  23. 5 out of 5

    Angie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Jane

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jb

  26. 4 out of 5

    L Arbour

  27. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Pond

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bastien Kirsch

  30. 4 out of 5

    Molli

  31. 4 out of 5

    Caşu Elisabeta

  32. 5 out of 5

    Tracey

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.