counter create hit Screen Time: How Electronic Media--From Baby Videos to Educational Software--Affects Your Young Child - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Screen Time: How Electronic Media--From Baby Videos to Educational Software--Affects Your Young Child

Availability: Ready to download

As a mother, Lisa Guernsey wondered about the influence of television on her two young daughters. As a reporter, she resolved to find out. What she first encountered was tired advice, sensationalized research claims, and a rather draconian mandate from the American Association of Pediatricians: no TV at all before the age of two. But, like many parents, she wanted straight As a mother, Lisa Guernsey wondered about the influence of television on her two young daughters. As a reporter, she resolved to find out. What she first encountered was tired advice, sensationalized research claims, and a rather draconian mandate from the American Association of Pediatricians: no TV at all before the age of two. But, like many parents, she wanted straight answers and realistic advice, so she kept digging: she visited infant-perception labs and child development centers around the country. She interviewed scores of parents, psychologists, cognitive scientists, and media researchers, as well as programming executives at Noggin, Disney, Nickelodeon, Sesame Workshop, and PBS. Much of what she found flies in the face of conventional wisdom and led her to conclude that new parents will be best served by focusing on “the three C’s”: content, context, and the individual child.


Compare
Ads Banner

As a mother, Lisa Guernsey wondered about the influence of television on her two young daughters. As a reporter, she resolved to find out. What she first encountered was tired advice, sensationalized research claims, and a rather draconian mandate from the American Association of Pediatricians: no TV at all before the age of two. But, like many parents, she wanted straight As a mother, Lisa Guernsey wondered about the influence of television on her two young daughters. As a reporter, she resolved to find out. What she first encountered was tired advice, sensationalized research claims, and a rather draconian mandate from the American Association of Pediatricians: no TV at all before the age of two. But, like many parents, she wanted straight answers and realistic advice, so she kept digging: she visited infant-perception labs and child development centers around the country. She interviewed scores of parents, psychologists, cognitive scientists, and media researchers, as well as programming executives at Noggin, Disney, Nickelodeon, Sesame Workshop, and PBS. Much of what she found flies in the face of conventional wisdom and led her to conclude that new parents will be best served by focusing on “the three C’s”: content, context, and the individual child.

30 review for Screen Time: How Electronic Media--From Baby Videos to Educational Software--Affects Your Young Child

  1. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    Good summaries of the research circa 2007 on TV, videos, and early educational software for young children in a vein that's closer to The Science of Mom: A Research-Based Guide to Your Baby's First Year; a little bit of the too much personal narrative/self-justification of Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know. There's a bit at the end about the emergence of touchscreens (smartphones, tablets) but there just hasn't been enough time fo Good summaries of the research circa 2007 on TV, videos, and early educational software for young children in a vein that's closer to The Science of Mom: A Research-Based Guide to Your Baby's First Year; a little bit of the too much personal narrative/self-justification of Expecting Better: Why the Conventional Pregnancy Wisdom is Wrong - and What You Really Need to Know. There's a bit at the end about the emergence of touchscreens (smartphones, tablets) but there just hasn't been enough time for scientific research to draw much in the way of conclusions there, I think. Takeaways: * we are monkeys and therefore our small monkeys are designed to learn best from 1:1 interactions with an adult that's paying attention to them, as well as physical world cause-and-effect. Most other methods don't improve on that but some can be decent substitutes since it's unlikely there are the resources for adult caregivers to optimize for learning all the time. * there's a thing called the "video deficit" where kids get more from observing the same instruction live than the same instruction as a video. * a lot of media we take for granted as adults actually requires a fair amount of abstract thinking capabilities. For example, just playing audio tapes won't do that much since it isn't connected to anything going on around the kid at present, and videos with cuts in them are pretty confusing. * just narrating what's going on and what you and the kid are looking at is most effective for language development * get into the habit of more intentional and engaged media viewing (aka don't have TV just on in the background) * screen-based educational media before age 2-2.5 is pretty unlikely to be effective, and after that age is only effective when well-designed to meet kids where they're at, which means simple narrative structures and lots of reinforcement * kids can't really tell that commercials have a particular intent behind them until 7 or 8, so videos are likely better than straight TV * kids also can't tell what's real or not very well, so reassuring frightened young kids with "don't worry, it's not real" is not very helpful or meaningful to them. Better to avoid scary media until after 5 and when exposure happens, move away from the screen entirely to a different activity.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carol Park

    Electronic media is exploding so why wouldn't you want your child to be part of the current trend and technology savvy at a young age? You might think it will give him/her an advantage in the future. Well, reading this book will give you something to think about and you just might reconsider your position. If you're a parent, this is worth the read!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Au

    Educational. Made me think differently about my preliminary thoughts about screen time - not all what's shown on the screen is bad... Things to consider when evaluating screen time: context, content, and child.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Danica Abisror

    I appreciated the overall thesis of the author in this book. Contrary to what I thought from the title, the author was not about giving guilt trips to parents for letting their kids watch tv. She explains a lot of studies (at times this gets long but some are pretty interesting and helpful) about kids and tech, specifically for kids under 5. And then she basically comes down to, parents need to be smart, interact with their kids and use technology wisely in light of studies and common sense. A b I appreciated the overall thesis of the author in this book. Contrary to what I thought from the title, the author was not about giving guilt trips to parents for letting their kids watch tv. She explains a lot of studies (at times this gets long but some are pretty interesting and helpful) about kids and tech, specifically for kids under 5. And then she basically comes down to, parents need to be smart, interact with their kids and use technology wisely in light of studies and common sense. A balance and informed perspective.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bardees

    I think this book taught me a lot about how kids respond to TV and what gets their attention at what age. I enjoyed reading it although it took me a while to finish it. having the epilogue with some insights on touchscreens was really beneficial and a needed addition to the book as Lisa highlighted key points to remember about screentime. Her new book studying screentime in relation to reading is coming out soon and I think I won't miss reading it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Susie Cameron

    To some extent this book was preaching to the converted. Great to have some research to support the damage being done to Gen S. the implications for the future of the human race and our 'humanity' - quite profound. (Always a fan of Blue's Clues)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nella

    2007 book with 2012 supplement. Very USA focussed (as to be expected) - some pragmatic comments and does "forgive" parents who use TV as an occasional babysitter. Preaching to the converted?

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dan Vinson

    Discussed in an April 2013 Atlantic cover story.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Good but not yet updated for apps

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jenn Z

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  12. 5 out of 5

    Woollythinker

  13. 4 out of 5

    Judy

  14. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

  15. 4 out of 5

    Eitan

  16. 5 out of 5

    Christine

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Cleland

  19. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  20. 4 out of 5

    Wen Xiang

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Sharpe

  22. 5 out of 5

    Laurieanne

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jason

  24. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jillian

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kim

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sunita

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gillian R.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Brian

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.