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Politically Correct Holiday Stories: For an Enlightened Yuletide Season

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Whether your favorite holiday story is A Christmas Carol, The Story of Hanukkah, or 'Twas the Night Before Christmas, you'll find it transformed to reflect current sensibilities in Politically Correct Holiday Stories. Injecting our popular holiday fables with a modern perspective is no easy task, but someone had to do it -- and who better than the proven master of cultural Whether your favorite holiday story is A Christmas Carol, The Story of Hanukkah, or 'Twas the Night Before Christmas, you'll find it transformed to reflect current sensibilities in Politically Correct Holiday Stories. Injecting our popular holiday fables with a modern perspective is no easy task, but someone had to do it -- and who better than the proven master of cultural sensitivity? James Finn Garner joyfully frees these holiday tales from sexism, ageism, religious imperialism, and every other sorry vestige of our flawed, low-consciousness past. So gather the family (whether traditional, dysfunctional, co-dependent, or otherwise) around the hearth, and read aloud these tales as they should have been told the first time.


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Whether your favorite holiday story is A Christmas Carol, The Story of Hanukkah, or 'Twas the Night Before Christmas, you'll find it transformed to reflect current sensibilities in Politically Correct Holiday Stories. Injecting our popular holiday fables with a modern perspective is no easy task, but someone had to do it -- and who better than the proven master of cultural Whether your favorite holiday story is A Christmas Carol, The Story of Hanukkah, or 'Twas the Night Before Christmas, you'll find it transformed to reflect current sensibilities in Politically Correct Holiday Stories. Injecting our popular holiday fables with a modern perspective is no easy task, but someone had to do it -- and who better than the proven master of cultural sensitivity? James Finn Garner joyfully frees these holiday tales from sexism, ageism, religious imperialism, and every other sorry vestige of our flawed, low-consciousness past. So gather the family (whether traditional, dysfunctional, co-dependent, or otherwise) around the hearth, and read aloud these tales as they should have been told the first time.

30 review for Politically Correct Holiday Stories: For an Enlightened Yuletide Season

  1. 4 out of 5

    Melki

    One winter day, their frustrated caregiver sent them outside to play. A layer of fresh snow had fallen the previous night, the first of the season, and the world outside looked as heavily frosted as a matrimonial enslavement cake. As everything around them glistened, Bobby and Betty tried to agree on what games to play. Should they make a snow fort? Too militaristic, said Betty. How about snow angels? No, commented Bobby, they had been raised agnostic. Besides, such a public display of religious f One winter day, their frustrated caregiver sent them outside to play. A layer of fresh snow had fallen the previous night, the first of the season, and the world outside looked as heavily frosted as a matrimonial enslavement cake. As everything around them glistened, Bobby and Betty tried to agree on what games to play. Should they make a snow fort? Too militaristic, said Betty. How about snow angels? No, commented Bobby, they had been raised agnostic. Besides, such a public display of religious figures might make others uncomfortable.* Ah, political correctness . . sucking the joy out of the holidays for decades now. In an attempt to please (and include) everyone, we've somehow declared a War on Christmas. Store clerks quiver, trying to find parting words that will NOT set off a customer. Party hosts shiver, wondering if offering eggnog to the lactose intolerant will cause a scene. The best thing to do would be to turn off all lights and hide under the covers until January 2nd, but since that's not an option for most of us, feel free to use Garner's book as a guide to not offending ANYONE, other than Fox News(?) watchers, who will surely take offense at, well, everything. Here are the proper versions of moldy holiday chestnuts like The Nutcracker and a certain antlered critter, who shall henceforth be known as Rudolph the Nasally Empowered Reindeer. The highlight of this brief book is undoubtedly the updated version of A Christmas Carol in which Scrooge undergoes Intercessory Therapeutics. Here, the Spiritual Facilitator of Christmas Retrospective takes the old weasel for a visit to his past: A horde of people in gaudy and disheveled clothing surged and careened around them, while disco music pulsed loudly and incessantly. In this elegant, crowded hotel ballroom, the holiday cheer spilled as much from the hearts of the celebrants as out of the numerous glasses held aloft. "And where are we now?" the Spirit asked as he shoved the mike in Scrooge's face. Scrooge yelled over the din, "My gosh! This is one of the office parties that old Fezziwig used to throw, before the feds got him. It's good to see it all again -- it was so hard to remember the morning after." Later Scrooge forgets himself and tries to join in the "Soul Train" line. Not all of the tales are winners, but this could be a pretty fun addition to whatever sort of traditional or non-denominational celebration you may be participating in this year. Or, in the words of a certain "reindeer enslaver and exploiter of elves" - "Happy Christmas to all, but get over yourselves!"** *from Frosty the Persun of Snow **from T'was the Night Before Solstice

  2. 4 out of 5

    M0rfeus

    Political Correctness has turned "the language of Kings James and Lear" (quote courtesy of Jay McInerney) into a hodgepodge of meaningless yet trendy words worthy of Orwell's 1984. This book satirizes the PC movement in regard to some of our traditional Christmas (pardon me, "Holiday") stories. My personal favorite is the PC "A Christmas Carol". The immortal first line of the original - "Marley was dead: to begin with." Becomes "Marley was non-viable, to begin with". Enjoy--but probably best to re Political Correctness has turned "the language of Kings James and Lear" (quote courtesy of Jay McInerney) into a hodgepodge of meaningless yet trendy words worthy of Orwell's 1984. This book satirizes the PC movement in regard to some of our traditional Christmas (pardon me, "Holiday") stories. My personal favorite is the PC "A Christmas Carol". The immortal first line of the original - "Marley was dead: to begin with." Becomes "Marley was non-viable, to begin with". Enjoy--but probably best to read around Christmas time!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    A perfect addition to your Christmas, er, non-denominational, unoffensive, non-specific late-year celebrations.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Another difficult review to write. I'm going to try to do it without getting into my personal politics. I had so much running through my mind, but it doesn't belong here. (Not that I let that stop me usually, but I'm going to try this time). I don't play ball with political correctness myself, and occasionally earn the scowls of more cultivated "persuns." I also try not to go out of my way to offend anyone, but it does happen accidentally. There's a happy medium here. Oh, come on. Just becaus Another difficult review to write. I'm going to try to do it without getting into my personal politics. I had so much running through my mind, but it doesn't belong here. (Not that I let that stop me usually, but I'm going to try this time). I don't play ball with political correctness myself, and occasionally earn the scowls of more cultivated "persuns." I also try not to go out of my way to offend anyone, but it does happen accidentally. There's a happy medium here. Oh, come on. Just because he's having a hell of a time with some serial rape allegations right now doesn't mean his quotes can't be applicable. That being said, you should know that most of the characters in these stories are uber-liberals of the type that even their own kind are sometimes ashamed of. Your Michael Moores, Nancy Pelosis, John Kerrys, Al... (wow, that no personal politics thing didn't last long). Let's just stop the list right there. For the sake of fairness, I'll admit that most of us on my team wish Michele Bachmann and Ricks Santorum and Perry and company would all just kind of stop talking, and simply check the R's in the ballot box. These super liberal characters in the stories sometimes come out on top, sometimes not, but it's always amusing, and made the book an absolute delight to read, even if I was occasionally discouraged to remember that people this over the top actually do exist. I take solace that they're the exception rather than the rule, however. The first four stories are very short, fewer than 10 pages each, and the last is about 60. I'm not going to explain the references to the titles as I go along. If you can't keep up with them, you're sorely lacking in American yuletide culture, and I encourage getting more immersed in that before proceeding. "Twas the Night before Solstice" is what you would expect: a homeowner extremely offended at everything Santa stands for, and his stand against him delivered in verse. This one has the best closing line of the stories: "But with parting disdain, do you know what he said, When this overweight huckster took off in his sled? This reindeer enslaver, this exploiter of elves? 'Happy Christmas to all, but get over yourselves!!'" I reckon you can get the idea of the rest of it from that. "Frosty the Persun of Snow" involves an amusing campaign against global warming instead of moving to a colder climate so he won't melt. "The Nutcracker" showcases the affects of appeasement with the mouse king, but Clara refuses to be given the Dorothy of Oz or Alice in Wonderland treatment through a fairyland journey which represents how weak womyn are, and "is symbolic of the violent abduction that occurs on the wedding night." (view spoiler)[The poor nutcracker now seeing how insensitive his invitation was stands chastened, and puts himself back in his proper place in the cupboard. (hide spoiler)] "Rudolph the Nasally Empowered Reindeer" made me think of the Russian Revolution with Rudolph meeting a Leon Trotskyish fate. "A Christmas Carol" was easily my favorite of the stories. It is one of my favorite books, after all, and I enjoy most parodies of it. This one is set in the late 20th century, Scrooge has several ex-wives; Diminutive Tim fares better though lawsuits regarding his father's poor insurance coverage from Scrooge; the ghost of Christmas present is a drunken louse with a designated driver, though it's the milk of human kindness that makes him tiddly; the ghost of Christmas yet to come is a goth whose sex can't be determined "(not that such an unimportant variable would be any reflection on his/her skills or authority)." (view spoiler)[The entire adventure backfires, though, and Scrooge plans to get revenge on everybody for how they really feel about his misunderstood self when he gets back to reality, but it turns out he was given the wrong treatment for his reclamation, as is explained to him by the Supervisory Spirit of Intercessory Therapeutics when she visits him with the official apology from their office. There was a mix up, and his therapy wasn't supposed to be the Past Regression-Future Progression treatment, but the Rapid Materialistic Voidance program. Then she burns down his business, blows up his house, has his car stolen, lapses the insurance on all of it, and leaves him with only the invitation to his nephew Fred's Christmas dinner. He goes, then rebuilds his business, and follows the spirit's lessons to the letter, though their intentions were still lost on him. He's just determined never to undergo spiritual therapy ever again, and though his deeds are good, his interest is still in protecting his own ass. (hide spoiler)] Also, this story has many quotes directly lifted from Dickens' version, and knowing those enriches the reading. Like I said before, this was an absolute delight. I think people of all political bends could enjoy this book, though for different reasons. Whether it's for ridiculousness or fervent support of various causes, the enjoyment is still there. It's light and quick, but I think having an interest in political correctness in one direction or the other, not to mention a sense of humor, enhances the enjoyment.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gerry

    I usually like to re-read 'A Christmas Carol' around Christmas each year. This time, instead of the Charles Dickens original (which I still might re-read), I have read James Finn Garner's politically correct version. The same message is presented but in quite a different way! In this version Scrooge and Marley were business partners in 'a ruthless capitalistic operation that took advantage of people's caffeine addictions and exploited coffee farmers in developing nations'! Money was still Scrooge I usually like to re-read 'A Christmas Carol' around Christmas each year. This time, instead of the Charles Dickens original (which I still might re-read), I have read James Finn Garner's politically correct version. The same message is presented but in quite a different way! In this version Scrooge and Marley were business partners in 'a ruthless capitalistic operation that took advantage of people's caffeine addictions and exploited coffee farmers in developing nations'! Money was still Scrooge's sole interest and his sole love and he exploited his administrative assistant Roberto "Bob" Crachit as he always did. Having got over 'this hogwash about a merry Christmas' with his nephew Fred and having answered his 'phone to receive an annoying 'Happy Holidays' pre-recorded message, he returns home in his well-travelled Volvo. There he encounters his terminally inconvenienced partner Jacob Marley, ensconced in chains. Jacob tells him that he will be visited that night by' three extra-dimensional intercessors. The first 'spiritual facilitator', complete with camera crew, duly arrives and takes Scrooge back into his past, showing him two or three of his former wives, and also visiting Mr Fezziwig who Scrooge spoke extremely highly of and stated how he enjoyed the lavish parties that he threw. But the ghost explains that Fezziwig was funnelling corporate assets to fund a personal lifestyle that included throwing the parties each year. Scrooge was mortified. Eventually the ghost departs leaving Scrooge exhausting himself doing battle with a floor cushion in his bedroom before he takes a couple of Nytol and falls fast asleep. The second of the spiritual facilitators announces himself as the Ghost of Christmas Present and he suggests to Scrooge, 'Let's Party!' They watched the film of 'It's a Wonderful Life' and then saw Fred partying and saying how his Uncle Scrooge would not take part, but in seeing the party go with a swing Scrooge gets really caught up in the merrymaking. By the time the ghost departed Scrooge is feeling a little re-educated. The third spirit showed Scrooge the shadows of the things that would happen in the future including Scrooge's own departure from this life. Scrooge announced, 'I'm not very good with this whole death concept' and that becomes particularly so when he hears others chatting about his will and what would happen to his money with one announcing, 'Well, look at it this way, he might have avoided paying for our services while alive, but our fair share of his money was bound to come eventually.' When the ghost leaves Scrooge is a changed man and he works hard to learn the lesson that his misfortunes were supposed to teach him ... and in the end he succeeds. This is a 'Christmas Carol' with plenty of political correctness about it. Also in the volume is ''Twas the night before Solstice' where 'all through the co-op/Not a creature was messing the calm status quo up', where games like Monopoly, Pay Day and Tycoon were played and the final message was 'Happy Christmas to all, but get over yourselves!' In addition there is 'Frosty the Persun of Snow' in which brother and sister Bobby and Betty build a snow person and then when it was wearing a top hat they argued about whether it was a boy or a girl. As they were arguing a voice asked, 'What's all the fuss about?' They turned to see a living, breathing fully articulate snow being. He/she announced himself/herself as being called Frosty. A TV company soon heard of Frosty and went along to do a broadcast but, having started to explain how he/she had walked at the head of a parade carrying banners stating 'No Ozone = No Snow Zone' and 'We won't just melt away', he/she melted under the glare of the hot lights. Frosty had melted into a grey pile of slush. The following year when the children went to make a snow person the celebrated top hat could not be found and they had to settle for making persuns of snow who faced their fates silently and unflinchingly. 'The Nutcracker' is given a new look while 'Rudolph the Nasally Empowered Reindeer' deals with the union to stop Santa exploiting him and his fellow reindeers before, like other revolutionaries, he finally lived out his final days in exile. The author presents five stories, while retaining the usual theme of each, with a completely different slant on them and each makes for thought provoking reading and, in a different way, quite as interesting as the originals.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Linda Lipko

    Witty, funny and very humorous.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Diane in Australia

    3 Stars = I liked the book. One of the books in my daughter's Christmas collection.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    Tongue in cheek fun for the holidays.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kate N. Ewing

    I read this long ago and thought it was hilarious. Now I just think it’s silly and slightly annoying. What a change in perspective!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Katie Harder-schauer

    This is a collection of stories that I read back in high school and really enjoyed. Rereading it as a very liberally minded adult immediately following the 2016 election, it provided just the levity I needed, while also fulfilling my need for holiday cheer. So I understand that these stories are actually making fun of political correctness, which should leave me feeling appalled right? But it doesn't. Because when political correctness is taken to the level that it is in these stories, it should This is a collection of stories that I read back in high school and really enjoyed. Rereading it as a very liberally minded adult immediately following the 2016 election, it provided just the levity I needed, while also fulfilling my need for holiday cheer. So I understand that these stories are actually making fun of political correctness, which should leave me feeling appalled right? But it doesn't. Because when political correctness is taken to the level that it is in these stories, it should be made fun of. Also, I have a sense of humor and can laugh at myself. My favorite tale from this collection is easily "'Twas the Night Before Solstice." I even used this poem for poetry readings for forensics in high school (which is like dramatic speech competitions. Other things you could compete in included dramatic monologue and improvised duet acting, as well as several other things.) I think I probably like this poem best because it sticks to the original most closely. The rhyming is on point, and it flows well while making "'Twas the Night Before Christmas" uber politically correct. Read the rest of my review on my blog --> http://justanothergirlandherbooks.blo...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Goerl

    Generally correct, but despite claims to be "politically correct," he's made the politically INCORRECT error of ASSuMEing that female reindeer are unrepresented among Santa's sleigh-pullers. Is "Vixen" a traditionally male name? I think not. Plus, of course, we have the politically incorrect, chauvanistic attitude that antlers and strong pulling ability must, by default, represent the male of the species. As many knowledgeable about reindeer will attest, the only antlered reindeer around Christm Generally correct, but despite claims to be "politically correct," he's made the politically INCORRECT error of ASSuMEing that female reindeer are unrepresented among Santa's sleigh-pullers. Is "Vixen" a traditionally male name? I think not. Plus, of course, we have the politically incorrect, chauvanistic attitude that antlers and strong pulling ability must, by default, represent the male of the species. As many knowledgeable about reindeer will attest, the only antlered reindeer around Christmas are pregnant FEMALE. This is a GREVIOUS, right-wing, anti-progressive, ultra-conservative error and entirely unacceptable for a book that purports to have the blessings of being "politically correct."

  12. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

    Oh Frosty the persun of snow. Your demise was so tragic! Garner is pretty brilliant. I love, love, love, his politically correct stories. I shall certainly share them with my pre-adults if I ever get any.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Still finishing one or two stories, but basically done. I guess I just couldn't get past certain parts of satire. I could see the jokes in some of it, but other points offended me. Didn't really enjoy it because of that.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elly White

    This series of satirical and humorous in regards to political correctness is great to share with friends. Children family, I'm going to read it at Christmas this year!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Erin Penn

    Somewhere between satire, mean-spirit, depressing reality, changing cultures, and cleverness, Politically Correct Holiday Stories resides. Created in 1995, the social commentary still has some relevance for twenty years later (review written 2017). Mr. Garner modernizes five Christmas classics using PC words of the 90's. Each ends with a downswing instead of an upswing, revealing the author's true stance on the subject. "A Christmas Carol" has the happiest ending. 'Twas the Night Before Solstice - Somewhere between satire, mean-spirit, depressing reality, changing cultures, and cleverness, Politically Correct Holiday Stories resides. Created in 1995, the social commentary still has some relevance for twenty years later (review written 2017). Mr. Garner modernizes five Christmas classics using PC words of the 90's. Each ends with a downswing instead of an upswing, revealing the author's true stance on the subject. "A Christmas Carol" has the happiest ending. 'Twas the Night Before Solstice - A twist on the classic "Twas the Night Before Christmas" has nice scans and rhymes Frosty the Persun of Snow - A mash-up of LGBT and climate warming warning easily appropriate in 2017. The Nutcracker - Military vs. mediation. Rudolph the Nasally Empowered Reindeer - Worker's rights. A Christmas Carol - Of the 100 pages of the book, 60 of them are dedicated to this story. Appropriate to its time and today, I have a problem with the underlying anger against toleration expressed within the manuscript, while - at the same time - nodding because the anger wasn't always misplaced or inappropriate. How PC is that review? Some things are funny and some things are not - and they will be different for each person. The satire is well-written.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Athena

    "How does that help Diminutive Timon?" This was the only point during the book where I laughed out loud. Having just read the original A Christmas Carol, I enjoyed this ridiculous collection of stories, including the retelling of the Dickens classic. Forget Bob Cratchit and the crippled Tiny Tim, we've got Roberto and the vaguely special Diminutive Timon. I remember first hearing about this series in the 90s when I was a naive child and imagined that political correctness was a fad and that eventu "How does that help Diminutive Timon?" This was the only point during the book where I laughed out loud. Having just read the original A Christmas Carol, I enjoyed this ridiculous collection of stories, including the retelling of the Dickens classic. Forget Bob Cratchit and the crippled Tiny Tim, we've got Roberto and the vaguely special Diminutive Timon. I remember first hearing about this series in the 90s when I was a naive child and imagined that political correctness was a fad and that eventually we would get over it. How wrong I was. If you would be offended by me exclaiming, "Did you just assume my gender?!"* in mock disgust for no reason whatsoever, then you would not enjoy this book. *This is a frequent leisure activity of mine.** **Did you just assume my preference for leisure activities?!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa Noch

    Hilarious and not the Christmas story collection I would read to children- too pedantic in word choice. However, that is half the fun! I also see the point the author is trying to make in being politically correct along with a certain absurdity in doing so. (It just made me laugh while also making the feminist inside of me yell, "Heck yeah!") It brought me great joy to read this while also making me think about what these Christmas stories were originally meaning to say, and what they mean now th Hilarious and not the Christmas story collection I would read to children- too pedantic in word choice. However, that is half the fun! I also see the point the author is trying to make in being politically correct along with a certain absurdity in doing so. (It just made me laugh while also making the feminist inside of me yell, "Heck yeah!") It brought me great joy to read this while also making me think about what these Christmas stories were originally meaning to say, and what they mean now that they've been rewritten. (Besides this, this was a great little book to find great new vocab, and it helped my sister out in finding some of this aforementioned vocab for her AP Language Arts vocab assignment. So, kudos for helping her with that and bringing us lots of laughs!)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sunni

    This book consists of five stories: 'Twas the Night Before Solstice, Frosty the Person of Snow, The Nutcracker, Rudolph the Nasally Empowered Reindeer, and A Christmas Carol. Garner's stories are packed with spectacular satire, and left me in hysterics. Although I am a true fan of Christmas, and love all of the original versions of these stories I couldn't have been happier about the jest poked in the direction of a society to absorbed in political correctness that it has forgotten the joy of a This book consists of five stories: 'Twas the Night Before Solstice, Frosty the Person of Snow, The Nutcracker, Rudolph the Nasally Empowered Reindeer, and A Christmas Carol. Garner's stories are packed with spectacular satire, and left me in hysterics. Although I am a true fan of Christmas, and love all of the original versions of these stories I couldn't have been happier about the jest poked in the direction of a society to absorbed in political correctness that it has forgotten the joy of a season. For an off-beat Christmas treat I urge you to pick up this book. It's a quick read and full of laughs.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Politically Correct Holiday Stories is a collection of several well-known Christmas stories changed to be politically correct. There are a few short ones (like Frosty and Rudolph) and then a long one (A Christmas Carol). They are all written in a sarcastic, over the top PC, way. There are two non-politically correct Christmas stories at the end, one about Santa’s childhood and one that was a surprisingly sweet story about a cabbie and possibly talking animals. It’s a fun, quick read. I recommend Politically Correct Holiday Stories is a collection of several well-known Christmas stories changed to be politically correct. There are a few short ones (like Frosty and Rudolph) and then a long one (A Christmas Carol). They are all written in a sarcastic, over the top PC, way. There are two non-politically correct Christmas stories at the end, one about Santa’s childhood and one that was a surprisingly sweet story about a cabbie and possibly talking animals. It’s a fun, quick read. I recommend reading it!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kaelyn

    Oh. My. Gosh. This book is HILARIOUS. Not because it was meant to be, but because the author tried not to offend anyone and, in the process, he has created some amazingly strange "politically correct" situations. Case in point: One of the stories is called "Rudolph the Nasally Empowered Reindeer". I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who wants to laugh really hard at his efforts to write the politically correct Christmas (sorry, holiday) stories.

  21. 5 out of 5

    P

    Some light-hearted reading for the holiday season. Read "Rudolph the Nasally Empowered Reindeer" first, it's the funniest. Frosty the Persun of Snow has some funny lines too: "The TV people tried to put some makeup on Frosty, to cut down on the glare off its forehead, but soon realized the task was impossible." and "By the time Bobby and Betty screamed 'Stop! Turn off the lights!' it was too late."

  22. 5 out of 5

    Debra

    I remember reading this book shortly after it came out in 1995. Being on the lookout for humorous Christmas tales, I picked this up to enjoy again. It is amazing how it stands the test of time. After a year where very little is amusing and we are finding that humor is becoming scarce, I very much enjoyed these short stories.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hank Hoeft

    Politically Correct Holiday Stories: For an Enlightened Yuletide Season is perfect Christmas season reading for fans of James Finn Garner's and Once Upon a More Enlightened Time, or for anyone unfamiliar with Garner's brand of satire, it's perfect for anyone tired of today's politically correct cultural climate and in need of a chuckle.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Regina

    Since it's "the season" I thought I'd enjoy these again. I must say that the re-working of Scrooge's 'intervention' wasn't quite as good as the opening re-working of 'Twas the Night before Christmas'. All in all, this is a little bit of light-hearted fun for the holidays. Also, easy to fit in around the busyness of preparations too.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I have had this book in my possession for quite a long time and finally got to read it at this seasonally appropriate time of year and it did not disappoint. I will say for a book written 25 years ago it has held up quite well. Frosty the persun of snow, a champion for non-binary inclusion! I could easily re-read this every year.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

    Definitely had funny moments. I'm a PC angry feminist type so while this book satirizes that I feel like it was in good fun. It was pretty repetitive at bits so I might recommend reading one story here or there rather than reading it straight through like I did.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This collection is okay, mildly interesting, but not all that great. I'd say the first part is a solid 2 stars, while The Christmas Carol parody is a probably a 3. That part was easily the best, even if the collection as a whole is a bit of a disappointment. It just seems like most of the stories here are one-trick ponies, without much substance, although their extreme brevity may account for that s well. The idea of being satirical isn't the foundation; it's the whole product. Scrooge's transfo This collection is okay, mildly interesting, but not all that great. I'd say the first part is a solid 2 stars, while The Christmas Carol parody is a probably a 3. That part was easily the best, even if the collection as a whole is a bit of a disappointment. It just seems like most of the stories here are one-trick ponies, without much substance, although their extreme brevity may account for that s well. The idea of being satirical isn't the foundation; it's the whole product. Scrooge's transformation in the last story was much more interesting than the characters in the other stories, perhaps because it was a longer tale with a more complete plot. I'm not sorry I read it, but I could probably take it or leave it.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amy (DemonKittie)

    Not very exciting for me. Made me laugh once or twice, but not too exciting.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Meadows

    Fun premise. Over the top, but not too far from the way things are becoming. I found The Night Before Christmas parody to be the most enjoyable portion.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lacy

    Very humorous in this day and age!!! Very enjoyable and quick read!

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