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Rich Dad's Retire Young, Retire Rich: How to Get Rich Quickly and Stay Rich Forever!

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Imagine being able to make so much money at an early age that you could decide when to retire, knowing full well that you have enough money stashed away to ensure a life not burdened by financial restraints. In this book, financial guru Robert Kiyosaki provides practical insight on how to put together a financial plan which promises not only to make you prosperous but to a Imagine being able to make so much money at an early age that you could decide when to retire, knowing full well that you have enough money stashed away to ensure a life not burdened by financial restraints. In this book, financial guru Robert Kiyosaki provides practical insight on how to put together a financial plan which promises not only to make you prosperous but to allow you to map out the freedom to choose your own retirement age. Built upon Kiyosaki's own personal experiences - he retired at the age of 49 - he shows how you can take advantage of smart investments in real estate and in the stock market to help you control your own financial destiny.


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Imagine being able to make so much money at an early age that you could decide when to retire, knowing full well that you have enough money stashed away to ensure a life not burdened by financial restraints. In this book, financial guru Robert Kiyosaki provides practical insight on how to put together a financial plan which promises not only to make you prosperous but to a Imagine being able to make so much money at an early age that you could decide when to retire, knowing full well that you have enough money stashed away to ensure a life not burdened by financial restraints. In this book, financial guru Robert Kiyosaki provides practical insight on how to put together a financial plan which promises not only to make you prosperous but to allow you to map out the freedom to choose your own retirement age. Built upon Kiyosaki's own personal experiences - he retired at the age of 49 - he shows how you can take advantage of smart investments in real estate and in the stock market to help you control your own financial destiny.

30 review for Rich Dad's Retire Young, Retire Rich: How to Get Rich Quickly and Stay Rich Forever!

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad Warner

    I thought Kiyosaki had some good ideas in Rich Dad Poor Dad, so when this book's title caught my eye, I thought it'd be worth a read. It definitely was! Kiyosaki admits that he's not the best writer, and I agree, but he has a compelling way of teaching important business and financial lessons through stories about his past. He shamelessly plugs his books, board games, and website, but it works; he sells tons of them, and I put several more of his books on my to-read list. The book's main point is I thought Kiyosaki had some good ideas in Rich Dad Poor Dad, so when this book's title caught my eye, I thought it'd be worth a read. It definitely was! Kiyosaki admits that he's not the best writer, and I agree, but he has a compelling way of teaching important business and financial lessons through stories about his past. He shamelessly plugs his books, board games, and website, but it works; he sells tons of them, and I put several more of his books on my to-read list. The book's main point is that you can't get ahead by simply working harder or working more hours. You need to use various forms of leverage. As Kiyosaki puts it, "Leverage is the ability to do more and more with less and less." Keep adding leverage, he promises, and you'll earn more and more by doing less and less work. I really liked Kiyosaki's explanation of income as earned, portfolio, or passive income, and how to use portfolio and passive income to minimize taxes and maximize what you keep. Although Kiyosaki made his wealth mostly in real estate, his lessons apply to any area of business. Notes Money doesn't make you happy, but it buys you the time to do what you love and pay others do do what you hate. Use debt (other people's money), not equity (your own money). Invest for cash flow, not capital appreciation. Cash flow gives you money now, but capital appreciation may never occur. The most important word in money is "cash flow". The second most important is "leverage". Good debt puts money in your pocket every month. Bad debt takes money out of your pocket every month. Buy assets, not liabilities. Supplement old financial tools like mutual funds with faster, safer, more information-rich tools. The rich use financial leverage, while the poor use physical leverage (hard work). Forms of leverage - debt - other people's money - other people's time - health - time - to find opportunities - education - relationships - business and personal. It's who you know, not what you know. - tools - spare time - do something worthwhile instead of meaningless leisure 3 kinds of education 1. academic 2. professional 3. financial The poor stop at academic or professional. The rich move up to financial. A winning strategy must include losing. If you expect to win 100% of the time, you'll never take the chances you need to succeed. Think in terms of risk and reward, not right or wrong, risky or safe. Instead of asking for more money for doing less work, do more for more people. 3 types of income Earned (50% money) - paycheck from job - government takes 50% - 401(k) fits here because withdrawals are taxed Portfolio (20% money) - paper assets (stocks, bonds, mutual funds) - government takes 15-20% of capital gains Passive (0% money) - real estate, royalties, intellectual property - tax-deferred - government takes as little as 0% for tax-free munis, depreciation from property improvements, and deferred capital gains on real estate that are rolled into charitable remainder trusts Business owners can buy many things with pre-tax dollars, but employees use after-tax dollars. Employee order: earn, pay taxes, spend remainder Business owner order: earn, spend, pay taxes on remainder To get rich quickly, be open to new ideas, and "take on possibilities greater than your current abilities. Have a reality that can change, expand, and grow quickly." Expand your context/reality/mind rather than increasing your content/information. Your future is determined by what you do today, not tomorrow, regardless of your dreams. "Stop doing today what you don't want to do in the future. Do today what you want for your tomorrows." Use faster words - cash flow from assets instead of a high-paying job - make money instead of save money - depreciation (asset gives immediate cash flow even though it may lose its value over time) instead of appreciation (waiting for asset to increase in value before you profit) (make profit when you buy, not sell) - invest in private companies instead of public companies - go to seminars instead of school The value of your labor increases incrementally. The value of assets increases exponentially. Leverage the power of networks. Network with organizations rather than competing against them, especially those larger than you. Leverage generosity The Law of Reciprocity: give and you shall receive serve more and more people be generous with your money; give to charities Everyone has financial problems, whether rich or poor. How you handle your problems determines if you'll become rich or poor. Good expenses make you richer. "Your greatest expense in life is the money you do not make". Don't park all your money in savings and mutual funds. Don't "buy, hold, and pray"; use the velocity of money to keep it moving and working for you. Create or acquire assets tax-efficiently. Decrease the risk of investing in paper assets with stops, calls, puts, and shorts. You'll make money whether the market goes up, down, or sideways. Don't keep all your money in paper assets. Even a diversified portfolio of paper assets isn't diversified enough. Portfolio paper assets business(es) real estate

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lichi

    I am embarrassed that I fell for this scam of a book. As an avid reader, I forgot my own rule of buying a book before falling for this POS: 1. First check the NEGATIVE reviews on both Goodreads (preferred) and Amazon (only for reference) 2. Then read the positive reviews After this if I am still inclined to reading it, I buy the book. Because at least I had been warned and I made the choice MYSELF. Now onto the book. It is full of 368 pages of repeated empty words. Empty words repeated 1000 times are I am embarrassed that I fell for this scam of a book. As an avid reader, I forgot my own rule of buying a book before falling for this POS: 1. First check the NEGATIVE reviews on both Goodreads (preferred) and Amazon (only for reference) 2. Then read the positive reviews After this if I am still inclined to reading it, I buy the book. Because at least I had been warned and I made the choice MYSELF. Now onto the book. It is full of 368 pages of repeated empty words. Empty words repeated 1000 times are still as void a blackhole. The latter at least has value in science. So why did I fall for it? I have an "excuse". An entrepreneur by the name of Mitchell Harper is someone whose articles about startups I enjoy reading and take heed of. He listed this book in his book list: https://medium.com/keep-learning-keep... Harper's main argument for the book basically comes down to one word, leverage. (Read his other posts and you'll realize he is fond of leverage. Who isn't.) But the book does NOT tell you anything applicable about how to use leverage. Kiyosaki throws 21 chapters of baloney at you that delude you into believing you can apply it. Once you get down to actually THINKING about HOW you would apply it in your own life, you realize you only learned one thing: use leverage. There, I just saved you $11.99 (for Kindle version) with these 2 words. Let me also bring to your attention to the fact that there are a lot of controversies surrounding Robert Kiyosaki. Google his name and his books. Let's just say that if you avoid MLM, you would avoid this guy and his books. Lastly, you don't have to believe me. But if you waste time reading or even buying it and then realize it was a big mistake, you have no one else to blame but yourself. I made a mistake that is my own. Don't follow me.

  3. 5 out of 5

    elene monroe

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. is the best book in the world, it's good is the best book in the world, it's good

  4. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Tan

    First let me start off by saying what I like about the Rich Dad series of books: I like that this book has been as popular as it has been. I think it has inspired a lot of people to learn about personal finance and how to build wealth. This is a very good thing. I would caution people, because a lot of the advice given in these books can be dangerous. The problem is these books don't actually give any solid advice on anything covered in these books. These authors sound repetitive and vague in each First let me start off by saying what I like about the Rich Dad series of books: I like that this book has been as popular as it has been. I think it has inspired a lot of people to learn about personal finance and how to build wealth. This is a very good thing. I would caution people, because a lot of the advice given in these books can be dangerous. The problem is these books don't actually give any solid advice on anything covered in these books. These authors sound repetitive and vague in each and every book. They repeat short one liners about how to build wealth, mention that anyone who wants to get serious talk to a finance adviser, and vaguely talk about how the authors got rich. If you are just starting out on reading personal finance and investing book and need an easy read, this may be for you. If you have already gone through a few books and want real information, I would skip these books over.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Millsfredo

    I think this is the fourth book in the Rich Dad's series. This book is about leverage and the second book, Cash flow Quadrant, is about cash flow aspect, while his third book is about investing. This book is about the ultimate investor tool which is leverage. I learned about the importance of the leverage of one's words. What one says might become true. "Your words are flesh." A must read book for anyone who wants to find the ultimate reason to retire young and retire rich and to rediscover your I think this is the fourth book in the Rich Dad's series. This book is about leverage and the second book, Cash flow Quadrant, is about cash flow aspect, while his third book is about investing. This book is about the ultimate investor tool which is leverage. I learned about the importance of the leverage of one's words. What one says might become true. "Your words are flesh." A must read book for anyone who wants to find the ultimate reason to retire young and retire rich and to rediscover your true self.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tihomir

    The book contains a lot of useful information related to way of thinking that you need to follow if you want to retire young and rich. It also has some info for books, audio cds that you should read/listen on a way to becoming rich. I was very excited and I read the book just for few days.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tony Rogers Jr.

    Overly long (330 pages) and repetitious at times but definitely one of my favorite books in the RichDad series. This book gets down to the nitty gritty of what it really takes to retire early and retire financially free (or rich if you would like). Its 21 chapters are broken down into 4 major sections: 1. The Leverage of your Mind This section covers the unique shifts in mindset you need to retire early 2. The Leverage of your Plan This section covers the importance of having a sound plan and tips Overly long (330 pages) and repetitious at times but definitely one of my favorite books in the RichDad series. This book gets down to the nitty gritty of what it really takes to retire early and retire financially free (or rich if you would like). Its 21 chapters are broken down into 4 major sections: 1. The Leverage of your Mind This section covers the unique shifts in mindset you need to retire early 2. The Leverage of your Plan This section covers the importance of having a sound plan and tips on creating one 3. The Leverage of your Actions This section covers the actions you must take to retire early 4. The Leverage of your first step This section is a summary of the book along with practical tips on getting started I took tons of notes and had many ah hah moments throughout the book but my favorite chapter came from Section 2 Chapter 13 The Leverage of Generosity. In this chapter Robert explains with great clarity why the rich are more generous than the poor (you must read it to truly understand the context of this statement) and how the key to great wealth is simply being more generous. I truly appreciated this chapter as it is definitely a game changer for me. This is another classic work added to the RichDad series I highly recommend it. Tony Rogers Jr Author of Visionary: Making a difference in a world that needs YOU

  8. 5 out of 5

    Adrian Stratulat

    The books from the Rich Dad series are something that everyone should read. Some said that Kiyosaki is too metaphorical in his financial advice, and you don't actually learn anything. That is because those people were not prepared to understand the message which was sent: The most important asset in determining one's financial future it's one's mentality. Our subjective reality is what separates success from failure. Everything else, from what to invest in, or how to develop financial IQ, are just The books from the Rich Dad series are something that everyone should read. Some said that Kiyosaki is too metaphorical in his financial advice, and you don't actually learn anything. That is because those people were not prepared to understand the message which was sent: The most important asset in determining one's financial future it's one's mentality. Our subjective reality is what separates success from failure. Everything else, from what to invest in, or how to develop financial IQ, are just technical steps. And when you can understand this, maybe you can follow on Kiyosaki's footsteps. After all, he is not just a guy that writes about success. He is financially successful; he has a personal wealth of over $ 80 milion. Maybe he can teach you a thing or two, eh?

  9. 5 out of 5

    Erik Dols

    How on earth did this get over four stars? This is terrible, a scam, says nothing of use and is a horrible, horrible way of getting money from gullible people. Ridiculous. I cannot believe people actually read this and gave five stars, those must be fake accounts from the writer/distributor. I bought it while waiting on an airport and had little hopes to start with but it was way worse than I expected. I hope the writer gets an uncomfortable itch the rest of his life.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    Of all the RICH DAD books this is my most favorite. Why? Simply because we've got someone who can walk the talk, telling us that most of the resistance we experience in making money is our own limitations. It didn't make sense when I was working a day job. Sounded like a bunch of huey, really, but, once I started down the entrepreneurial path, that all changed. I'm in total agreement. Most of the limitations Americans experience with wealth is all in their heads. That said, for those willing to Of all the RICH DAD books this is my most favorite. Why? Simply because we've got someone who can walk the talk, telling us that most of the resistance we experience in making money is our own limitations. It didn't make sense when I was working a day job. Sounded like a bunch of huey, really, but, once I started down the entrepreneurial path, that all changed. I'm in total agreement. Most of the limitations Americans experience with wealth is all in their heads. That said, for those willing to take a deep look in themselves and who are willing to grow, this is one of the best books on the matter. Highlights included: (1) The most expensive advice is free advice b/c the wrong advice can destroy you. How many times do we take advice from next door neighbors about stocks when they know nothing, or, almost nothing? What does this have to do with mental limitations. Plenty. The people we associate with or want to believe can hold us back if their advice isn't accurate. I wouldn't take advice from journalists on TV, who make less than 100k yet give advice on the stock market daily, would you? Well, lots of people do listen to them.; (2) The power of expanding one's reality. How many things do we feel are not true yet are? Wasn't their a time when we believed man could not fly and now we can fly?; (3) Why do most of us not have a financial plan? Why do we rely on the govt to take care of us? Why do we choose to not have a long term plan?; (4) Why the language we use restricts us even if we choose to believe it. If we say CANNOT or SOMEDAY how does that make us feel? How does it not serve us?; (5) Setbacks and how they help us. Most people give up when they're really close.; (6) How to create a winning team to assist you; (7) The velocity of money application; and (8) all types of leverage to achieve our financial goals. Highly advised reading. NOTE: I think RK sometimes makes things sound easy. While some of the concepts are simple, nothing is easy. I did pre-foreclosures for a couple of years and that was tough work. I made enough money to sit back and reflect and now I'm doing something I want to do: write a novel. I don't plan to return to real estate but I do appreciate the many financial lessons. 12/20/05.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn

    What an inspiring book! I listened to this book on audio, like I did the original Rich Dad, Poor Dad, and I am on my second listen through. There is so much good information in this book that if used carefully, could make a huge difference in people's lives. I sure intend to let it make a difference in mine! What I learned most from this book: it all starts with expanding your reality - opening your mind to the possibilities, taking steps to educate yourself (like reading this book), and surroun What an inspiring book! I listened to this book on audio, like I did the original Rich Dad, Poor Dad, and I am on my second listen through. There is so much good information in this book that if used carefully, could make a huge difference in people's lives. I sure intend to let it make a difference in mine! What I learned most from this book: it all starts with expanding your reality - opening your mind to the possibilities, taking steps to educate yourself (like reading this book), and surrounding yourself with the right people. Once you get started, the next steps will begin to feel less intimidating and flow more naturally.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tremayne Moore

    I had to read this book twice. A lot of people may not like this book because it's not a "how-to." Through this book, I was able to write two blogs (Complacency & Talents as well as Complacency & Hebrew Slaves). This book encourages you to tap into your God-given ability. The underlying message in this book is simply this: If we would focus on our God-given assignments and not compete, you will actually be rich (physical or spiritual). I had to read this book twice. A lot of people may not like this book because it's not a "how-to." Through this book, I was able to write two blogs (Complacency & Talents as well as Complacency & Hebrew Slaves). This book encourages you to tap into your God-given ability. The underlying message in this book is simply this: If we would focus on our God-given assignments and not compete, you will actually be rich (physical or spiritual).

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tim Jones

    A good book that really opens your eyes to how important the mental aspect of creating wealth is. If you context of what can be done is not high enough, you’ll never reach true wealth. He talks about how it’s a mindset more than anything. Then goes into how he used real estate to build wealth. The second half of the book on buying stocks I would not read again. The book was a little long.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Devin

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Like many of the other Rich Dad books, this is more about expanding your mind and giving you another way to view wealth building. I like how he categorizes ideas and puts them into perspective. This book address retiring young and rich, drawing heavily on Kiyosaki's, and his wife, Kim, story (like before). Less redundancy than some of his other books, but he makes up for it with filler. Notes "Cash flow is the most important word in the world of money. The second most important word is leverage. Like many of the other Rich Dad books, this is more about expanding your mind and giving you another way to view wealth building. I like how he categorizes ideas and puts them into perspective. This book address retiring young and rich, drawing heavily on Kiyosaki's, and his wife, Kim, story (like before). Less redundancy than some of his other books, but he makes up for it with filler. Notes "Cash flow is the most important word in the world of money. The second most important word is leverage." If you want to retire young and retire rich, the first thing you must do is use the power of your brain to make you rich (p.1). It is your self-doubt and laziness that keep you small. It is your self-doubt and laziness that deny you the life you want(p.5). The reason most people do not do what they can do is because they do not have a strong enough why (p.7). Response to people who say "Money does not make you happy" is: money buys you time to do what you love and pay other people to do what you hate doing (p.11) Leverage-ability to do more with less (p.33). The people who utilize the more leveraged financial tools get ahead financial. People who use obsolete, out-of-date, or inadequate tools of financial leverage put their financial security and their financial future a risk. While mutual funds are by no means obsolete, they are not the leveraged financial tools of choice of the more educated investor (p.36). "People 100 years ago were strong enough to run their own businesses in spite of the risks. It was only people like Henry Ford began building mega-business that more and more people became employees." (p.49) The average person who avoids losing and expects to win 100%of the time is the person who often has the loser's strategy. Expecting to win 100% of the time and never failing is a loser's reality. "A winning strategy must include losing." (p.50). When it comes to retirement planning, most people have a loser's strategy because it is a strategy that does not allow any room for error (p.51). Many losers bet only on sure things like job security, a steady paycheck, a guaranteed pension, and interest from a bank account. Most people will never fly financially simply because they choose to avoid failing (p.52)The number one leverage is the leverage found in your mind because it is where your realities are formed (p.55). You can change your realities by reading biographies of people who live the life you want (p.56). Most people who do not become financially strong with being cheap, being frugal, not spending money, and living below their means (p.57). "The easiest way to become rich is by being generous" (p.68). Wanting more money for doing the same amount of work can be greedy. More apartments means lower rents; it is the basic economic principle of supply and demand. (p.69) One of the main differences between a small business-person and big businessperson comes down to how many more people that business owner serves. A big business owner will do his or her best to build a system to serve as many people as possible (p.71). "Teaching people to spend their lives working for earned income is like teaching someone to be a high-paid slave for life." (p.74) "If you do not have a plan for your money after you die, then the government does." (p.75) The government gives tax loopholes for real estate investors is because it wants investors to keep their money invested in real estate to provide a supply of housing for people who choose not to buy or cannot afford their own home. The tax break keeps investors such as Kim and me provide an abundant supply of rental homes and thus keeps down the cost o housing. These tax incentives also keep the real estate industry vibrant, and help the nation's economy stay strong, since real estate makes up a large sector of the U.S. economy. If the real estate industry hurts, so does the country." (p.77). The most expensive advice you can receive is free advice.It is advice from your friends and relatives who are not rich and have no plans on becoming rich (p.78). "The problem with Social Security is that it only works for people who want to be poor. If after you retire and you find that Social Security is not enough for you to live on, and you go to work for earned income, the government will begin reducing Social Security payments. In other words, the only way to receive a full payment is to choose to be poor, in most cases" (p.82). By simply starting a small home-based business, buying a franchise, or joining a network marketing company, you are moving into more tax-advantaged income (p.83). The S quadrant has a few more advantages over the E quadrant, the main one being the ability to deduct some expenses from your gross income, prior to being taxed (p.85). The sooner you learn to acquire passive and portfolio income, the sooner you are on your way to retiring young and retiring rich (p.86). The fastest way to become rich is to be able to change your realities faster (p.90). "There is plenty of money in the world. If you want to be rich, you need to fist expand your reality [context] in order to hold on to your share of that abundance" (p.92). Section II: The Leverage of your Plan A professional investor always has an exit strategy before they invest (p.100). Always start at the end before you begin. Before you investing, you need to first to know how, when, where, and with how much you want to exit (p.101). If you want to see how the world will be in ten years, just watch a 15 boy or girl (p.107). Observe the world from their eyes and you will see the future. Many people do not realize their financial goals because they use such words as someday, maybe, or in the future. Your future is created by what you do today, not tomorrow (p.115). "We practiced every day, preparing for the day when our window of opportunity would appear.Once it appears, we took our shots and then the window closed." (p.116) *Ask yourself "If I keep using these words, and thinking these thoughts, at which level will I exit?Will it be poor, middle-class, affluent, rich, or ultra-rich?" (p.117-118). Dreamers dream dreams and rich people create a plan to the future (p.118). "If you cannot read a financial statement, you cannot see your financial past, present, or future...If you want healthy teeth in the future, brush your teeth today." (p.119) The rich invests in shares of a company after it becomes a public company (p.127). **Many seminars are more context-expanding than content-increasing. A person who has just had his or her context expanded often cannot say specifically what he or she got (p.132). A P/E ratio simply measures the relative price of a stock as compared to its earnings. For example, if the stock paid a $2 per share dividend and the stock cost $20 per share, the stocks's P/E ratio would be 10...which would mean it would take you ten years to get your $20 back if all things remained the same (p.141). The goal of calculating your wealth ratio was to have your passive and portfolio income equal or exceed your total expenses. Once your passive and portfolio income exceed your expenses, the ratio would be 1 or higher and you would be out the rat race (p.142). ***The most life-destroying world of all is the word Tomorrow (p.148). (p.154) Poor $25,000 or less per year Middle Class $25,000-$100,000 per years Affluent $100,00-1 Million to per year Rich $1 Million or more per year Ultra-Rich $ Million or more a month "I recommend having some experience buying, selling, and especially managing real estate before going after high leveraged deals...The trouble with no-money-down real estate deals is that there is often too much leverage and that type of highly leveraged instrument can easily ea t you alive if anything should go wrong" (p.159). **Because one of the great problems facing this country is low-income affordable housing. The government is afraid that without people like you, millions and millions of people will go homeless and be forced to live in substandard, crime ridden slums. The government is going after slumlords and is taking some of them to jail. These slumlords prey on the poor and the government wants to put a stop to them. At the same time, the government is willing to offer billions of dollars to individuals like you who have proven themselves to be responsible managers of large multifamily projects." (p.165) The reason most people are not rich is simply because they are not generous enough (p.167). If you want to retire young and rich, it's okay to be greedy, just as long as you constantly work to find ways to give more to more and more people. If you do that, you will find your own path to great wealth (p.168). Leverage your assets, not labor (p.172). A business owner must pay the asset first. That means continually reinvesting enough money and resources in order to keep the asset strong and growing. Too many business owners put themselves in front of the asset, the employees, and everyone else (p.183). The business owners take most risk, and also gets paid last (p.184). Too many people in the E or S quadrants are limited as to how many people or organizations they can serve...hence their income is limited. A true business owner in the B quadrant who focuses on building a business that continually serves more and more people will become richer and richer. "If you want to be rich, all you have to do is train yourself to have rich habits (p.191). Hire a Bookkeeper, sit down with them, and go over your numbers each and every month (p.194). Too many people are falling behind because the information in their heads is ancient history or they cling to answers that were right yesterday, but wrong today (p.198). Rule of 72- dividing the number 72 by the interest or the percentage of gain in value to give the relative speed your money will double (p.217). Three basic classes of assets: Real Estate, Paper Assets, and Businesses. "In today's information age, it is imperative that we all have more than one context and be in more than one quadrant (p.277).

  15. 4 out of 5

    Razvan Rogoz

    What a gem of a book this is... This is a book about paradigm shifts, about looking at the world in a different way. And this was recommended to me exactly at the right time, a time when it's not about doing things better but instead, learning to do things different or simply, do different things. Compared to Rich Dad, Poor Dad, I've found this to be amazing. It made me realise how many emotional obstacles I have regarding money and business and how my own context is holding me back. I've found th What a gem of a book this is... This is a book about paradigm shifts, about looking at the world in a different way. And this was recommended to me exactly at the right time, a time when it's not about doing things better but instead, learning to do things different or simply, do different things. Compared to Rich Dad, Poor Dad, I've found this to be amazing. It made me realise how many emotional obstacles I have regarding money and business and how my own context is holding me back. I've found the stories educative and after reading all of it, I know something shifted inside of me. So if you really want to change your relationship with money and success in general, go ahead, read it. Sure, the author is the object of jokes because he's too general, too cliched, too XYZ, but this is truly valuable. It has a very "Think and Grow Rich" vibe to it and I'm grateful I've invested the time to read it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Fajarmt11

    Good

  17. 5 out of 5

    Stefani

    Mostly a repeat of advice he gives in Rich Dad Poor Dad.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Malin Friess

    I was skeptical from the start about reading a book entitled "Retire Young, Retire Rich" with a glossy picture of author Kiyosaki dressed in Steve Jobs black and then again pictured on the back of the book enjoying the rich life entitled..free at last (Kiyosaki and Wife pictured riding horses on Fiji in the sun wind tustling their hair with the coast line in the background.) Regardless, Kiyosaki has a few excellent overarching principles that I agree with. 1) Leverage your money. Make your money I was skeptical from the start about reading a book entitled "Retire Young, Retire Rich" with a glossy picture of author Kiyosaki dressed in Steve Jobs black and then again pictured on the back of the book enjoying the rich life entitled..free at last (Kiyosaki and Wife pictured riding horses on Fiji in the sun wind tustling their hair with the coast line in the background.) Regardless, Kiyosaki has a few excellent overarching principles that I agree with. 1) Leverage your money. Make your money work for you and not you for your money. Your time and skills are limited by the hours of the day. 2) Be wary of financial planners. Their fees may erase your margin of earnings. 3) Kiyosaki is a strong proponent of buying real estate rentals. Their are numerous tax advantages. If you buy rental properties..then you don't just buy the cow to slaughter it...you buy the cow for the milk and then at one point for the meat as well. Kiyosaki is not a fan of buy and flip. He feels a good real estate investment should be able to make income on day one with rent. Kiyosaki does not claim buying real estate is easy. He has a 100-3-1 rule. Look at 100 properties online, visit 3 in person. Then pick 1. There's much in which I disagree with Kiyosaki. 1) Kiyosaki would advise against using a 401k..he says that is for average investors..for people who are happy with the Dow Jones "AVERAGE". With the tax advantages, and match..not funding an available 401 K does not seem wise. 2) Kiyosaki does not encourage paying down debt. He would advise an investor to borrow and buy real estate. This book was written in 2000 (before the Real Estate bubble of 2007). Many have gone bankrupt who bought real estate in the early 2000's to see the value decrease by 50% in less than a decade. 3) Kiyosaki is a propent of owning your own business. While this is wise in having a different stream of income..I think Kiyosaki may underestimate the time, and mental emotional stress this may cause. 4) Kiyosaki wants investors to be active investors using options, collars, hedge funds, buy and sell hold points. Is this beyond the ability and time available for the average investor? And don't most studies show that active investing profits are erased by the cost of the trades, taxes,a and losses? Kiyosaki is not a fan of index mutual funds, buy and hold, and dollar cost averaging..which seem to work? I don't doubt that Kiyosaki is rich. But what portion of his money did he make based upon his investment principals vs. selling his best selling books and his brand (richdad.com). I don't begrudge him for be a successful author, but it seems authors like this are never completely transparent about how they have accumulated their wealth. Maybe I should look into a rental property (even though it might mean I have to go there every week to mow the lawn).

  19. 5 out of 5

    Visal Visal

    I strongly recommend this book to everyone despite the title of the book. You don’t have to be old to retired. In fact, it’s just what’s you believe in and what’s you do with your belief that lead to your future consequences. Get this book now and let it stretch your reality, your point of view on every aspect of life. I’ve been reading many of his books, somehow, found some of the books are redundant; however, this book is different from the other. You’ll find it useful.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Manohar

    Very good book on pointing out the right direction in getting the financial education you need. This book is filled with lot's of useful tips and it's organized in a very good way. Don't confuse this for a check-list or an instruction guide to your desires. Here you'll find the right references and the right direction, but it's up to you to learn a lot more before becoming succesful. Very good book on pointing out the right direction in getting the financial education you need. This book is filled with lot's of useful tips and it's organized in a very good way. Don't confuse this for a check-list or an instruction guide to your desires. Here you'll find the right references and the right direction, but it's up to you to learn a lot more before becoming succesful.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jansen Wee

    Took my time to really understand what he was saying. Great stuff.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Usiere Uko

    Very inspirational. Shows that one can get what one really wants. Excellent read

  23. 4 out of 5

    David Rosage

    One of the best books I have read in a log time. Has pushed me over the edge to start investing in passive cash flow opportunities like real estate and franchised businesses.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sreten

    This is the fifth book of Rich Dad series and I think the series finally deserve a review! The book is as good as the previous ones, with motivational moments, advices about managing your money and with specific topics about investing. And the fact that Robert is often repetitive (which he is in all his books) doesn't give it a lower score. He just wants you to remember and incorporate simple rules of financial thinking of a wealthy person's mind, and to expand your context. Many people will hat This is the fifth book of Rich Dad series and I think the series finally deserve a review! The book is as good as the previous ones, with motivational moments, advices about managing your money and with specific topics about investing. And the fact that Robert is often repetitive (which he is in all his books) doesn't give it a lower score. He just wants you to remember and incorporate simple rules of financial thinking of a wealthy person's mind, and to expand your context. Many people will hate it, just like the previous ones but those who read between the lines will get a benefit from it. Eventually. This book is not for everyone though, nor everyone would understand it. I suggest starting from book number one, so you could understand his philosophy. In book one he speaks about his "two fathers" (was it a true story or not is not important-because I heard people saying that he made up all so he could sell books) who had totally different views throughout their lives regarding money and he decided to adopt the thinking of the one who built his own future by bying assets (businesses, real estate, securities). Not relying on salary, company raises, finding better payed job... Seven of the most importannt money words are: income, expense, asset, liability, cash flow, leverage. He explains how to understand corelation between these words, Cash Flow is the second book, where he introduces quadrant (E)mployed, (S)elf employed, (B)usinessman, (I)nvestor. In third book he focuses more on investing tactics of different types of investors, fourth is about what and how we should teach our kids about money-and also ourselves. Fifth book among the rest tells us about leverage types that we can and need to use to retire early. The most important is that he teaches us throughout all five books about simple steps that we MUST do if we want to get financial freedom and buy time. Because time is the most expensive asset that we have, or don't have. Not everyone desires to achieve this goal (or don't take appropriate steps towards achieving it-except dreaming), some people are comfortable with the idea of waking up every morning and having to go to work so they could pay for their living...They are taught to think only from the perspective of employed person-self employed. But for those who crave for freedom-freedom to use their time for whatever they desire to do, to be independent, work what they love without "must", this is the right place for the start! P.S. It will be hard in the beginning, but as you progress you will feel the desire to learn more and more, and to take action, and make mistakes...for only those who are not afraid of making mistakes progress in life!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Juhi

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Retire young retire rich is a 5th book in the series of Rich Dad by Robert Kiyosaki. Robert in this book shares his journey of retiring very rich at an age of just 47! He speaks about his real life experiences and struggles and how he came through without losing his motivation.
My main motive to pick up this book was to learn something new from this book. Not exactly retiring thing but getting rich thing. After reading this whole book I realized that I knew most of the points put forward in this Retire young retire rich is a 5th book in the series of Rich Dad by Robert Kiyosaki. Robert in this book shares his journey of retiring very rich at an age of just 47! He speaks about his real life experiences and struggles and how he came through without losing his motivation.
My main motive to pick up this book was to learn something new from this book. Not exactly retiring thing but getting rich thing. After reading this whole book I realized that I knew most of the points put forward in this book. Being a graduate in finance degree and currently working with futures and options I knew everything what Richard was trying to say.
So the main crux of the book is to motivate the readers to follow their dream of becoming rich by starting their own business. Job security, according to the author is not security but the biggest risk.
I summarized few points from the book to narrow it down to give the idea as a whole.
• Always remember the risks of starting a new business. Never be afraid to fail. Always keep in mind the odds of the success of business. And when you get demotivated with the failures or endless cycle of trying always remember WHY YOU STARTED IN THE FIRST PLACE.
• This book states a very important fact which very few know that a business would get more tax benefit compared to a salaried person. More tax breaks and easier access to loans are available to business and very few to salaried person.
• Networking is a super power in the business world. So always work on your networking skills.
• We are as good as our word so always try to keep your words.
• A GOOD TEAM is the most critical thing in the business. If you have a strong team your business would go places.
Robert also gives some strategic plan on investment portfolio. The most important thing while making an investment portfolio is the “EXIT STRATEGY”. Always be clear when you want to exit in either cases profit or loss.
To reitre rich one must get rich source of passive income. And the source of passive income is Real Estate. Robert also gives an incident when he didn’t have the money to buy a very good piece of property and how he took the advantage of Loans from bank! Loan not only provided the required money but also tax breaks! But buying Real Estate comes with its own set of risk so you are supposed to evaluate your property properly, if caution is not taken an opportunity woukd soon turn into a disaster and a big debt.
This is my first book in Rich Dad series and this book has too many references of the earlier books which I didn’t read so it did bother me to some extent. But if you are following rich dad series from the beginning this book would definitely be an addition in your financial knowledge.
The book has so many points that are repetitive and used again and again which made me a little impatient with the book.
The book is will prove to be a good read for people currently in the process of increasing the financial knowledge by learning how to take advantages of tax breaks and loans. But wont prove much useful for people already working in finance field.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    The first two-thirds of the book emphasizes the importance of creating your own reality by believing in your ability to retire rich and to retire young. It stressed the importance of leveraging one’s mind as the first step towards reaching your goal of financial freedom at a younger age. Because what you believe in shapes your reality. Kiyosaki offers simple exercises to help people examine their current lives and to help with setting their goals in the first part of the book. Kiyosaki is a horri The first two-thirds of the book emphasizes the importance of creating your own reality by believing in your ability to retire rich and to retire young. It stressed the importance of leveraging one’s mind as the first step towards reaching your goal of financial freedom at a younger age. Because what you believe in shapes your reality. Kiyosaki offers simple exercises to help people examine their current lives and to help with setting their goals in the first part of the book. Kiyosaki is a horrible writer, which he admits throughout the book himself. The content of the book is repetitive. This could have been a much shorter, more concise book. But I believe it is one of the many ways Kiyosaki makes his passive income, by shamelessly promotes his other products including books, games and seminars. Although it feels like a waste of my time committing myself to read through his horribly written and disorganized content, I do appreciate his honesty and straightforwardness in this regard. The last one-third of the book offers more constructive advice on investing. Kiyosaki discusses, not in great detail though (that you would have to attend his $5000, three-day seminar and maybe you would get something, not all, more concrete out of him). Kiyosaki covers briefly the ideas of leveraging money (money you already have as well as money you don’t), real estate, paper assets and business for making more money. Personally I find the real estate aspect and making passive income interesting topics. What I like about this book, aside from Kiyosaki’s repetitive mantra of leveraging one’s mind, is his emphasis on financial literacy and financial education. He makes it clear that investing is not risky (that’s the poor people’s way of thinking) as long as we are willing to leverage that “risk” (or whatever you would like to call it) and use it to one’s advantage. But beyond that, willingness to initiate one’s own financial education is second to successfully achieving one's goals. I would recommend this book to anyone who wishes to improve his own financial situation. I would categorize this book as a self-help book, rather than a financial advice book. I give this book 1.5 stars. (2 stars on Goodreads).

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Anderson

    Appropriately motivating, conveying an adequate balance of encouraging spiritual advice and practical insight. The latter may come up short for some readers seeking a paperback step-by-step guide to "success," as Kiyosaki rather intends to inspire by sharing personal stories of success. He does so within the grander framework of his endorsement of maximizing "leverage" (a key term) in current economic contexts by maximizing economic knowledge. In short, this book's a swell little starting point, Appropriately motivating, conveying an adequate balance of encouraging spiritual advice and practical insight. The latter may come up short for some readers seeking a paperback step-by-step guide to "success," as Kiyosaki rather intends to inspire by sharing personal stories of success. He does so within the grander framework of his endorsement of maximizing "leverage" (a key term) in current economic contexts by maximizing economic knowledge. In short, this book's a swell little starting point, a pep-talk, for someone like me, who's anxious to dive into learning about personal finance management from an active asset-management standpoint. Kiyosaki cops up to not having the strongest track record with writing, and this entry in his series indeed does grow rather repetitive (with a whole lot of questionably-authentic recollections of conversations during speaking events and with colleagues that nonetheless convey worthwhile messages). The whole thing takes on the tone of a lecture, and, holistically, it's pleasantly digestible. I look forward to checking out more of Kiyosaki's shtuff for more inspo! <3

  28. 4 out of 5

    Yvette Bowlin

    Great book, a classic in some circles. Walking around with this book in my hand got me a lot of attention from people who read it. It reads like your grandpa is giving you the advice of a lifetime. Redundant and dragging at times, you still listen intently. "Ok gramps, get on with it." just enough to pique interest and get the brain thinking, but shy of enough tactical information. It's a great read to start to think like a millionaire, an entrepreneur, someone who wants to think bigger... It's Great book, a classic in some circles. Walking around with this book in my hand got me a lot of attention from people who read it. It reads like your grandpa is giving you the advice of a lifetime. Redundant and dragging at times, you still listen intently. "Ok gramps, get on with it." just enough to pique interest and get the brain thinking, but shy of enough tactical information. It's a great read to start to think like a millionaire, an entrepreneur, someone who wants to think bigger... It's necessary financial advice from the rich to those who want to become rich. It's a good book to springboard off of into more research. Some concepts he only touches on, so go deeper with people you meet in the industry who can help point the way further. He's opening your eyes to the opportunities in the financial realm, showing you how the rich get richer. Then, it's up to you to take cue, go out, inquire, network, and brave the risky (yet rewarding) life of an investor. It's a jumping off point for real estate investment, and for that (since I took the advice), is priceless.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lai

    The only reason why I read RK's book was because I wanted to know what made him think it was right for him, in an interview, to diss "fools" who forced sold their properties to him during the 2008 crash. I was prepared to read his book and conclude that he is a snake oil salesman and a unscrupulous businessman that fed on the blood of the poor. Well I was right and wrong. Yes, this man May be harsh with the truth, and abit vague on the details, but I learnt a lot from this book. The key concept The only reason why I read RK's book was because I wanted to know what made him think it was right for him, in an interview, to diss "fools" who forced sold their properties to him during the 2008 crash. I was prepared to read his book and conclude that he is a snake oil salesman and a unscrupulous businessman that fed on the blood of the poor. Well I was right and wrong. Yes, this man May be harsh with the truth, and abit vague on the details, but I learnt a lot from this book. The key concept was only to buy assets that earn you money when you bought it, and to re-look the type of income that you are able to retain the most, after tax. He probably is too gutsy with his suggestion to buy options, but he is also right to say you always need to know what you are doing and not to follow everything you read blindly. A book that really changed my context.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Harriman

    I'll be honest, when reading this in public I would make an effort to not let the people around me see the title. However, as corny as it is, the book has some good info in it. The best material in the book is on how to leverage your mindset. I think he does a great job of explaining how to use your mind to make your dreams a reality. But, for every good piece in the book, there's also some fluff. I wish the book was more straight forward and just got to the nitty gritty of what he wanted to tal I'll be honest, when reading this in public I would make an effort to not let the people around me see the title. However, as corny as it is, the book has some good info in it. The best material in the book is on how to leverage your mindset. I think he does a great job of explaining how to use your mind to make your dreams a reality. But, for every good piece in the book, there's also some fluff. I wish the book was more straight forward and just got to the nitty gritty of what he wanted to talk about. Overall, good book with good tips but this is meant to be an easy to read and understand book so if you're looking for more of a practical and analytical financial book, I'd look somewhere else.

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