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Mary Ann Shadd Cary: The Black Press and Protest in the Nineteenth Century

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Mary Ann Shadd Cary was a courageous and outspoken 19th-century African- American who used the press and public speaking to fight slavery and oppression in the U.S. and Canada. Part of the small free black elite who used their education and limited freedoms to fight for the end of slavery and racial oppression, Shadd Cary is best known as the first African-American woman t Mary Ann Shadd Cary was a courageous and outspoken 19th-century African- American who used the press and public speaking to fight slavery and oppression in the U.S. and Canada. Part of the small free black elite who used their education and limited freedoms to fight for the end of slavery and racial oppression, Shadd Cary is best known as the first African-American woman to publish and edit a newspaper in North America. But her importance does not stop there. She was an active participant in many of the social and political movements that influenced the 19th century - abolition, black emigration and nationalism, women's rights, and temperance. Emigrating to Canada in the 1850s, she taught the children of fugitive slaves and founded a newspaper, the "Provincial Freeman." During the Civil War, she recruited black troops for the Union Army, and in the midst of Reconstruction she entered law school at middle age to become the second black woman attorney in the nation.


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Mary Ann Shadd Cary was a courageous and outspoken 19th-century African- American who used the press and public speaking to fight slavery and oppression in the U.S. and Canada. Part of the small free black elite who used their education and limited freedoms to fight for the end of slavery and racial oppression, Shadd Cary is best known as the first African-American woman t Mary Ann Shadd Cary was a courageous and outspoken 19th-century African- American who used the press and public speaking to fight slavery and oppression in the U.S. and Canada. Part of the small free black elite who used their education and limited freedoms to fight for the end of slavery and racial oppression, Shadd Cary is best known as the first African-American woman to publish and edit a newspaper in North America. But her importance does not stop there. She was an active participant in many of the social and political movements that influenced the 19th century - abolition, black emigration and nationalism, women's rights, and temperance. Emigrating to Canada in the 1850s, she taught the children of fugitive slaves and founded a newspaper, the "Provincial Freeman." During the Civil War, she recruited black troops for the Union Army, and in the midst of Reconstruction she entered law school at middle age to become the second black woman attorney in the nation.

37 review for Mary Ann Shadd Cary: The Black Press and Protest in the Nineteenth Century

  1. 4 out of 5

    April Young

    This is a fascinating look at the life of Mary Ann Shadd Carey and her role in African-American and African-Canadian history, and the unusual steps she had to take to break barriers in the fields of journalism and law.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    Very interesting history. This author's writing style took me a minute to get used to (too much information is packed into each sentence in my opinion) but when I did I liked her style, and her objectivity, and the story.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ella Gilbert

  4. 4 out of 5

    Antonia (Toni)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  6. 4 out of 5

    Indya Jackson

  7. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

  8. 4 out of 5

    hoopiefoot

  9. 5 out of 5

    Christina

  10. 4 out of 5

    JT

  11. 4 out of 5

    Krista the Krazy Kataloguer

  12. 5 out of 5

    Yasmin

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jbondandrews

  16. 4 out of 5

    Michael Strode

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Hopson

  18. 5 out of 5

    Holly

  19. 5 out of 5

    BMR, LCSW

  20. 5 out of 5

    Animelove24 Brown

  21. 4 out of 5

    Peytyn Mize

  22. 5 out of 5

    Misha Stallworth

  23. 5 out of 5

    Izetta Autumn

  24. 4 out of 5

    UIC Office of Diversity

  25. 5 out of 5

    BookDB

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lynette Lee (J.Kirby)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Naseema

  28. 4 out of 5

    Erin

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  31. 5 out of 5

    Bailey

  32. 5 out of 5

    Ann

  33. 4 out of 5

    Lois

  34. 4 out of 5

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  35. 4 out of 5

    Kerri

  36. 5 out of 5

    Marion

  37. 5 out of 5

    Amy

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