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The Theory of Social Revolutions (Librivox Audiobook)

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Brooks Adams (1848- 1927), was an American historian and a critic of capitalism. He believed that commercial civilizations rise and fall in predictable cycles. First, masses of people draw together in large population centers and engage in commercial activities. As their desire for wealth grows, they discard spiritual and creative values. Their greed leads to distrust and Brooks Adams (1848- 1927), was an American historian and a critic of capitalism. He believed that commercial civilizations rise and fall in predictable cycles. First, masses of people draw together in large population centers and engage in commercial activities. As their desire for wealth grows, they discard spiritual and creative values. Their greed leads to distrust and dishonesty, and eventually the society crumbles. In The Law of Civilisation and Decay (1895), Adams noted that as new population centers emerged in the west, centers of world trade shifted from Constantinople to Venice to Amsterdam to London. He predicted in America’s Economic Supremacy (1900) that New York would become the centre for world trade. The Theory of Social Revolutions was written in 1913. (Wikipedia)


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Brooks Adams (1848- 1927), was an American historian and a critic of capitalism. He believed that commercial civilizations rise and fall in predictable cycles. First, masses of people draw together in large population centers and engage in commercial activities. As their desire for wealth grows, they discard spiritual and creative values. Their greed leads to distrust and Brooks Adams (1848- 1927), was an American historian and a critic of capitalism. He believed that commercial civilizations rise and fall in predictable cycles. First, masses of people draw together in large population centers and engage in commercial activities. As their desire for wealth grows, they discard spiritual and creative values. Their greed leads to distrust and dishonesty, and eventually the society crumbles. In The Law of Civilisation and Decay (1895), Adams noted that as new population centers emerged in the west, centers of world trade shifted from Constantinople to Venice to Amsterdam to London. He predicted in America’s Economic Supremacy (1900) that New York would become the centre for world trade. The Theory of Social Revolutions was written in 1913. (Wikipedia)

30 review for The Theory of Social Revolutions (Librivox Audiobook)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Marts (Thinker)

    American historian Brooks Adams critised capitalism and sort to explain the development of commercialism, he theorised a predictable rise and fall in commercial activities with the formation of commercial centres based on a need for such activities to be more easily practised. He also expounded upon the desire to increase individual wealth which leads to the discarding of spiritual values and an eventual and total break down of society as a result of greed...

  2. 4 out of 5

    J. Wootton

    Brilliant socio-economic analysis on the inherence of "bench legislation" within the structure of U.S. government. Exceptionally enlightening. P.S. it's out of copyright, so I downloaded the audio book for free (legally!) from Project Gutenberg & LibraVox. Brilliant socio-economic analysis on the inherence of "bench legislation" within the structure of U.S. government. Exceptionally enlightening. P.S. it's out of copyright, so I downloaded the audio book for free (legally!) from Project Gutenberg & LibraVox.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Strong Extraordinary Dreams

    A warning to anyone considering this book: don't: It's just too out-of-date. I read 20 pages or so and just realized it was pointless You would have to be a specialist historian or rather "historisist" investigating past theories to get anything out of this book. A warning to anyone considering this book: don't: It's just too out-of-date. I read 20 pages or so and just realized it was pointless You would have to be a specialist historian or rather "historisist" investigating past theories to get anything out of this book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tech Nossomy

    Interesting for historical reasons, a treatise on the making of American democracy and the many questions and dilemmas that we still grapple with today. However, much of the content is outdated and reads like a pamphlet. The theory that societal change can only be brought about through revolutions has been revised, and replaced by the view that evolution and one driven by market forces and societal movements have a more profound and meaningful impact. Some biblical anecdotes have been added in an Interesting for historical reasons, a treatise on the making of American democracy and the many questions and dilemmas that we still grapple with today. However, much of the content is outdated and reads like a pamphlet. The theory that societal change can only be brought about through revolutions has been revised, and replaced by the view that evolution and one driven by market forces and societal movements have a more profound and meaningful impact. Some biblical anecdotes have been added in an effort to embellish the otherwise dry text.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Bertin

    This book really resonated with me. The similarities in the last chapter Inferences to today's politics, and the mindset of the current president is uncanny in every sense of the word. The electoral college elected The Capitalist. This book really resonated with me. The similarities in the last chapter Inferences to today's politics, and the mindset of the current president is uncanny in every sense of the word. The electoral college elected The Capitalist.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chris Doelle

    This book may have been revolutionary when it was first written but it just doesn't hold up. The author's take on history from his era was interesting but misses the mark quite a bit. This book may have been revolutionary when it was first written but it just doesn't hold up. The author's take on history from his era was interesting but misses the mark quite a bit.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shaaadz.Gaulgmail.Com

    for my duty

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    interesting more by historical comparison than by its own merit.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rob

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michael The Audio Book Master

  11. 5 out of 5

    Gerardo Bruzon

  12. 4 out of 5

    Matej Martiniak

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  14. 5 out of 5

    Catharine

  15. 5 out of 5

    Däv

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Schreiber

  17. 4 out of 5

    Steve Ririani

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Laudick

  19. 4 out of 5

    a

  20. 4 out of 5

    C

  21. 4 out of 5

    Allan Wooster

  22. 4 out of 5

    Leopold Publishing

  23. 4 out of 5

    J

  24. 5 out of 5

    yoon sang moon

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ankush Ganguly

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brenna Sydel

  27. 4 out of 5

    Smooth Herman

  28. 5 out of 5

    Maggie

  29. 4 out of 5

    Danijel Brestovac

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jason Goetz

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