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Stealing the Language: The Emergence of Women's Poetry in America

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Stealing The Language represents the first comprehensive appraisal of women's poetry in America and brilliantly defines one of the most exciting and original literary movements of our time. Stealing The Language represents the first comprehensive appraisal of women's poetry in America and brilliantly defines one of the most exciting and original literary movements of our time.


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Stealing The Language represents the first comprehensive appraisal of women's poetry in America and brilliantly defines one of the most exciting and original literary movements of our time. Stealing The Language represents the first comprehensive appraisal of women's poetry in America and brilliantly defines one of the most exciting and original literary movements of our time.

30 review for Stealing the Language: The Emergence of Women's Poetry in America

  1. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    I'm so grateful this book exists. Absolutely imperative for any working poet, and especially women poets, to have this as a resource, a guide, and a history. I only wish there were a more recent edition taking in the last 20 years of women's poetry! I'm so grateful this book exists. Absolutely imperative for any working poet, and especially women poets, to have this as a resource, a guide, and a history. I only wish there were a more recent edition taking in the last 20 years of women's poetry!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sherry Chandler

    I have to put this book right up there with The Madwoman in the Attic as a classic of feminist criticism. What Gilbert and Gubar did for the novel, Ostriker does for poetry. And since my formal education, back in the dark ages now (and it didn't get much past the Victorians anyway), was thoroughly steeped in the male canon, I desperately needed the balance Ostriker supplies. Though it is 20 years old, we seem to be in a period of backlash against "confessional" poets like Plath and Sexton, and I I have to put this book right up there with The Madwoman in the Attic as a classic of feminist criticism. What Gilbert and Gubar did for the novel, Ostriker does for poetry. And since my formal education, back in the dark ages now (and it didn't get much past the Victorians anyway), was thoroughly steeped in the male canon, I desperately needed the balance Ostriker supplies. Though it is 20 years old, we seem to be in a period of backlash against "confessional" poets like Plath and Sexton, and I still needed to hear what this book has to say. I'd say I wish I'd read it sooner, but I tend to think there's a karma that guides us to read a book when we need to read it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Robin Dilks

    I am a huge fan of Alicia Ostriker. Her writing is thought provoking and her poetry is beautiful without being sappy or weak. I loved Stealing Language. Ostriker is one of the predominant poets & writers of our lifetime.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    This book is gold. I wish that I would have read it sooner instead of putting it off for so long.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    Excellent book on the topic!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Julia Cimafiejeva

    Very interesting and informative. I'd like to use Alicia Ostraker's ideas for analyzing Belarusian female poetry. Very interesting and informative. I'd like to use Alicia Ostraker's ideas for analyzing Belarusian female poetry.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Isla McKetta

    Though I couldn't bear to read the first 60 pages about the total and utter subjugation of women's poetry before the late 1800s, the rest of this book provided solid insights on both poetic trends and how they fit into feminism over time. I learned a lot as a writer and as a woman and reading this book has not only made me a more courageous writer, but it fleshed out my reading list as well. Though I couldn't bear to read the first 60 pages about the total and utter subjugation of women's poetry before the late 1800s, the rest of this book provided solid insights on both poetic trends and how they fit into feminism over time. I learned a lot as a writer and as a woman and reading this book has not only made me a more courageous writer, but it fleshed out my reading list as well.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Leah Hedrick

    Should be required reading for any academic studying feminist literature, or any feminist studying literature or any feminist writer. It's a map of our heritage as women writers in the United States. Should be required reading for any academic studying feminist literature, or any feminist studying literature or any feminist writer. It's a map of our heritage as women writers in the United States.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jan

  10. 4 out of 5

    Melanie Miller

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ami

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jeannine

  13. 5 out of 5

    Craig Werner

  14. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

  16. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  17. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Lightner

  18. 5 out of 5

    Loïc Blondeel

  19. 5 out of 5

    Leah

  20. 5 out of 5

    Terry Everett

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lianna

  22. 5 out of 5

    Allison Hanna

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nan

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kimbers W

  25. 4 out of 5

    Stacey

  26. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

  27. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Willoughby

  29. 4 out of 5

    Blaze

  30. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

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