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Sentiment 26

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2065. La guerre a plongé le monde dans le chaos. Le Guide suprême a pris le commandement de la dernière cité et l’a organisée en différentes castes : de A à D, des citoyens Admirables aux citoyens Déviants. Tous ont subi une lobotomie. C’est la garantie qu’ils respecteront Les Sentiments, le livre qui fait loi. Et surtout qu’ils ne s’aventureront pas hors de l’enceinte, ch 2065. La guerre a plongé le monde dans le chaos. Le Guide suprême a pris le commandement de la dernière cité et l’a organisée en différentes castes : de A à D, des citoyens Admirables aux citoyens Déviants. Tous ont subi une lobotomie. C’est la garantie qu’ils respecteront Les Sentiments, le livre qui fait loi. Et surtout qu’ils ne s’aventureront pas hors de l’enceinte, chez les Damnés… Evie, 16 ans, une B, travaille pour le gouvernement. Promise à Lucas, parfait A et futur haut dirigeant, elle est en fait amoureuse de son frère Raffy, infréquentable D. Quand le Système bannit Raffy sur les terres des Damnés, elle refuse de se soumettre. Trouvera-t-elle la force de s’opposer à la Cité ?


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2065. La guerre a plongé le monde dans le chaos. Le Guide suprême a pris le commandement de la dernière cité et l’a organisée en différentes castes : de A à D, des citoyens Admirables aux citoyens Déviants. Tous ont subi une lobotomie. C’est la garantie qu’ils respecteront Les Sentiments, le livre qui fait loi. Et surtout qu’ils ne s’aventureront pas hors de l’enceinte, ch 2065. La guerre a plongé le monde dans le chaos. Le Guide suprême a pris le commandement de la dernière cité et l’a organisée en différentes castes : de A à D, des citoyens Admirables aux citoyens Déviants. Tous ont subi une lobotomie. C’est la garantie qu’ils respecteront Les Sentiments, le livre qui fait loi. Et surtout qu’ils ne s’aventureront pas hors de l’enceinte, chez les Damnés… Evie, 16 ans, une B, travaille pour le gouvernement. Promise à Lucas, parfait A et futur haut dirigeant, elle est en fait amoureuse de son frère Raffy, infréquentable D. Quand le Système bannit Raffy sur les terres des Damnés, elle refuse de se soumettre. Trouvera-t-elle la force de s’opposer à la Cité ?

30 review for Sentiment 26

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jilly

    All of the dystopian boxes were checked: love triangle, controlled city with dangerous people outside, evil "leader", caste system, arranged marriages. And, there were many borrowed elements: the leader was called the "Brother", as in Big Brother like 1984; having too many emotions was considered dangerous, as in Delirium; and teenagers were "Matched" - that word Matched was even used - by their parents, to be married. As a matter of fact, every part of the story felt familiar and overused. All of the dystopian boxes were checked: love triangle, controlled city with dangerous people outside, evil "leader", caste system, arranged marriages. And, there were many borrowed elements: the leader was called the "Brother", as in Big Brother like 1984; having too many emotions was considered dangerous, as in Delirium; and teenagers were "Matched" - that word Matched was even used - by their parents, to be married. As a matter of fact, every part of the story felt familiar and overused.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    What a hot mess. Why does every YA dystopian read need a love triangle? Why was there zero character development? What is the point of Raffy beyond constantly being annoying? Why does the timeline for this book seriously not work in my head? Why is the main character named Evie when V for Vendetta got there first? (This seriously bothered me the entire book because when I hear the name Evie my brain automatically reads it in Hugo Weaving's voice, so.) The only reason this wasn't a one star read i What a hot mess. Why does every YA dystopian read need a love triangle? Why was there zero character development? What is the point of Raffy beyond constantly being annoying? Why does the timeline for this book seriously not work in my head? Why is the main character named Evie when V for Vendetta got there first? (This seriously bothered me the entire book because when I hear the name Evie my brain automatically reads it in Hugo Weaving's voice, so.) The only reason this wasn't a one star read is because (a) it went quickly and (b) Lucas was the only shred of decent character work and originality in this book. But with lines like: "next to her was Raffy, deeply asleep still, his rhythmic breathing providing a slow tempo beat" - I mean, seriously? I should really subtract that bonus star for the first two pages being a Wikipedia quote about the amygdala. Ridiculous.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michelley

    If I knew this book was written by Gemma Malley and that the research blurb at the beginning of the book is referenced from freaking Wikipedia (lol, who does that, really? A published author who uses Wikipedia as their main source?) I wouldn't have wanted to read this book. I only picked it up because it was a Goodreads Recommendation and I initially thought the premise was interesting enough to take a stab (no puns intended) at this novel. I never had high expectations for dystopians, knowing h If I knew this book was written by Gemma Malley and that the research blurb at the beginning of the book is referenced from freaking Wikipedia (lol, who does that, really? A published author who uses Wikipedia as their main source?) I wouldn't have wanted to read this book. I only picked it up because it was a Goodreads Recommendation and I initially thought the premise was interesting enough to take a stab (no puns intended) at this novel. I never had high expectations for dystopians, knowing how they usually urn out -- Across the Universe and Under the Never Sky are two novels that come to mind. I was looking just to read a book, to pass the time with. This is not that book. Not even on a basic, fundamental level. Let me explain what's wrong with this book: 1. The research. One of my close friends is studying neuroscience and she's talked about these terminologies, effects, and behaviors before and have subsequently incorporated them into her own writing. I learned most about the field of study from her writing. If I gave this book to her to read, she'd be more than definitely pissed off that the author decided to quote Wikipedia, as if she was too lazy to even source from an academic journal. She said, in the back with the interview, that she did in fact, research from academic sources; so why did she choose Wikipedia over the journal(s)? This to me is just sloppy, slap-dash research and it makes me question the book's credibility-- from page 1, and it's not a good thing to have on one's mind when you start reading a book. 2. 1984 references. Yes, I get there's a 'Big Brother' watching over the city, monitoring everyone's actions. But can I get the information in a way that's less.... preachy? Everything about the book is preachy; Gemma Malley tries too hard to build her dystopian world that it fell short. I got tired of the preaching, the exposition ,and the utter lack of plot and action. 3. The characters. Evie was an annoying passive narrative and she just seems to float around, doing nothing. She keeps thinking there's something wrong with her, even though that would mean she'd get downgraded to a D, or to even undergo a New Baptism. Raffy is an ansty teenager who thinks his brother ratted out their father. He's not only super intolerable personality-wise, but the fact he's in a love triangle.... Although I expected no less from a dystopian YA book. Lucas wasn't annoying, but there was no chemistry at all for him to like Evie. Everything seems to happen because "it's supposed to be this way in the City so it is. They are getting married because they are." I can go on and on about the book and how bad it is, but I won't make you suffer from my rant. The book is bland, boring, and horribly paced. Not to mention it has insufficient research, and the sliver of research it has is from questionable sources. There's nothing to like about the book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Booknut

    This. Book. Was. Amazing! The Killables, a definite must-read by Gemma Malley, came into my possession on one of my frequent trips to buy out my local Dymocks. I was searching the shelves for something good to read when BAM. There it was. I had read the Declaration, and loved it, and I was intrigued by the blurb so I decided to give it a try. An excellent Dystopian novel. Evie's struggle for understanding - to come to terms with whether or not the laws and regulations of the society she has known This. Book. Was. Amazing! The Killables, a definite must-read by Gemma Malley, came into my possession on one of my frequent trips to buy out my local Dymocks. I was searching the shelves for something good to read when BAM. There it was. I had read the Declaration, and loved it, and I was intrigued by the blurb so I decided to give it a try. An excellent Dystopian novel. Evie's struggle for understanding - to come to terms with whether or not the laws and regulations of the society she has known her whole life, and the society itself, are truly as 'good' as they make out to be. She seems to be in a state of semi-conciousness. She KNOWS that something is off about what is happening, but she has been conditioned to ignore that feeling and to doubt herself. She gets angry at her parents? Must be evil inclinations and she should repent and try harder. Having bad dreams? It is her fault because she refuses to try and be good and she is evil. It is a tiring life Evie lives and you empathise with her. You want to shake her and show her the truth. My crash-course on The Killables: - Evie lives in 'the City' where the Goods live. - Goods are people who are not evil, but have the capacity to be 'tempted' towards evil - Outside the City live the Evils - They are evil and long to lead the Goods to the 'dark side' (sorry...a little too Star War-sy, perhaps?!) - The Good's society is strict, regulated and stifling. People are graded - A, B and C being acceptable. D means you are in Danger of becoming an Evil. - Evie longs to come to terms with how she feels about her Society. - She keeps having weird dreams about being carried to safety by a man and a woman - She is to be engaged to a boy who has the emotions of a Siberian wasteland and whom she does not love - She is in love with that boy's brother who is trying to find a means of escape - The City has eyes everywhere. No one is safe. It is all-knowing. - There is a final grade. K. It stands for Evils, so they are told. Evils are given a New Baptism, to help them become good again. But really, K stands for Killable. Which means, they are to be killed without a moment's hesitation. It really makes us ask ourselves whether our identity is with our society and the environment we grow up in or whether we ourselves have to break away from the norm and discover our own identity. Oh, and I loved Raphael. And Lucas. Though personally I couldn't pick between the two if my life depended on it. It would be like choosing between books or chocolate...you just don't go there!:D

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    I only give this book three stars because I'm intrigued by the plot itself. I was thoroughly confused about why the book ended where it did, but I can live with that. What I cannot live with is how much I actively hated some of the characters, Raffy in particular. His character never progresses past a possessive, petulant child and I found myself actively rolling my eyes at his constant whining. I understand the plot tries to set it up as he was young and believed his whole life that his brothe I only give this book three stars because I'm intrigued by the plot itself. I was thoroughly confused about why the book ended where it did, but I can live with that. What I cannot live with is how much I actively hated some of the characters, Raffy in particular. His character never progresses past a possessive, petulant child and I found myself actively rolling my eyes at his constant whining. I understand the plot tries to set it up as he was young and believed his whole life that his brother lied to him, but that fails to truly come across and instead we are left with an unchanging, and utterly unlikeable character. I also found it hard to believe Evie's sudden change into a strong character as she spent the better part of the book being guilted into things by Raffy. In the end, it wasn't clear that she actually loved Raffy, or was just used to only having him. I really wanted to like Evie, so hopefully that suddenly strength will last throughout the series. In any case, I'll tune in to the next book for the answers to unresolved questions and to see how Lucas and Linus progress. I doubt I'll come around to like Raffy very much though.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tamara

    This would have been a really good read if the writing was much better and all forms of development were more you know, developed.... Idea: Excellent World Development: Executed Poorly Character Development: Lacking Plot Development: Horrible

  7. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    *Contains slight spoilers* The book that started my love for Dystiopian fiction. My school libary had Gemma Malley come to our school a week before the release of The Killables to promote it, i was lucky to attend and the book just sounded fantastic. It was a great read, the introduction to the City wasn't overdone but covered enough so the story wasn't confusing. Evie's character was likable as you understood her situation and felt for her because of the pressing laws of the City. Raffy was a char *Contains slight spoilers* The book that started my love for Dystiopian fiction. My school libary had Gemma Malley come to our school a week before the release of The Killables to promote it, i was lucky to attend and the book just sounded fantastic. It was a great read, the introduction to the City wasn't overdone but covered enough so the story wasn't confusing. Evie's character was likable as you understood her situation and felt for her because of the pressing laws of the City. Raffy was a character that i disliked due to absolutly no development and only stood out in the story because of his annoyance, Lucas on the other hand was an interesting character as you learned about his 'emotionless' being. The idea of the story was interesting, but i felt there could have been more description towards their actions especially as at one moment they were at camp and the next they had destroyed the City, i felt we really needed to hear a bit of risitance from the City as it seemed all too-easy. I can't see how this could be a series, correct my if im wrong but i do believe that all was sorted out in the first book, yes you have the question 'What now?' but i don't see how it could be a potential story line with out dragging on.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ella

    This book is now my all time favourite book, it incorparates every possible level into it, Romance, Action, Fantasy, everything, i love the way the book makes you feel deeply for each and every character and has you in the same position as Evie, and i love the way that everything you read and thought in the beginning turns out to be a lie, but you don't know it when your reading it becasue you believe what Evie believes, the book finishes at i massive cliffhanger and especially the taster from t This book is now my all time favourite book, it incorparates every possible level into it, Romance, Action, Fantasy, everything, i love the way the book makes you feel deeply for each and every character and has you in the same position as Evie, and i love the way that everything you read and thought in the beginning turns out to be a lie, but you don't know it when your reading it becasue you believe what Evie believes, the book finishes at i massive cliffhanger and especially the taster from the second book, (about 20 lines long) makes you jump up and down with impatience waiting for the second book. i also love the way that i have never heard any idea like the one represented and written in this book at all, it is absolutely and completely new, in comparison with books like harry potter, which are amazing and well loved, although it is clear that a lot of the writers inspiration has come from lord of the rings, however, this book is unlike anything i have ever read in my life, and i think that Gemma Malley deserves an Oscar for it!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alli

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. You'd think Big Brother society + creepy religious undertones would be right up my alley, but the book ended and I kind of wished the bad guys had won (and, hey, maybe they do - it's the first of a trilogy, after all). The main character is totally passive and spends the whole book doing nothing, until the end where she has to be badass now, look at her being badass, omg she's so badass you guys. The "romantic" lead, in addition to being saddled with the unfortunate name of "Raffy" (that I kept You'd think Big Brother society + creepy religious undertones would be right up my alley, but the book ended and I kind of wished the bad guys had won (and, hey, maybe they do - it's the first of a trilogy, after all). The main character is totally passive and spends the whole book doing nothing, until the end where she has to be badass now, look at her being badass, omg she's so badass you guys. The "romantic" lead, in addition to being saddled with the unfortunate name of "Raffy" (that I kept reading as "Rapey") spends the book confusing pouting with brooding and arguing with the main character over stupid stuff. So the book ends and the society is free now? And the main character is going to spend books 2-3 finding her parents? I think that was the resolution but it's hard to tell because nothing happened until it did. Whatever. I wish the zombies had come into the city and eaten them all.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Well, I think my five stars say enough since I rarely give five stars. I walked across this one in a bookstore in Amsterdam and the blurb sucked me right in. I thought the cover looked pretty fun and I was super excited to read it! Well, I'm not gonna say what it is about, read the blurb and be surpised. But I think if you liked Divergent, her Declaration series and/or Delirium you'll love this one as well. If you didn't like those titles, well I hope you will still give it a shot. It's well writ Well, I think my five stars say enough since I rarely give five stars. I walked across this one in a bookstore in Amsterdam and the blurb sucked me right in. I thought the cover looked pretty fun and I was super excited to read it! Well, I'm not gonna say what it is about, read the blurb and be surpised. But I think if you liked Divergent, her Declaration series and/or Delirium you'll love this one as well. If you didn't like those titles, well I hope you will still give it a shot. It's well written, the main character is human and so likeable. I liked the other characters as well, one in particular. Let's hope the second book will satisfy my need for certain things to happen ;)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Erin Mcfarlane

    I've seen this book sitting on the bookshelf in the study for many years now, having belonged to my sister previously. Thinking to myself "Hey, why not?" I picked it up for the first time and started reading. First impressions: Haven't I seen this before? And pretty much, the more I kept reading, the stronger that thought became. A young woman, who feels out of place in this "too perfectly logical" dystopian society -- see what I mean? Also, I wasn't convinced by the sudden character development I've seen this book sitting on the bookshelf in the study for many years now, having belonged to my sister previously. Thinking to myself "Hey, why not?" I picked it up for the first time and started reading. First impressions: Haven't I seen this before? And pretty much, the more I kept reading, the stronger that thought became. A young woman, who feels out of place in this "too perfectly logical" dystopian society -- see what I mean? Also, I wasn't convinced by the sudden character developments at certain points, for example when Evie finds out that Lucas really was good the whole time, the rest of the book she's thinking about how amazing he was, despite not really knowing this new "not-Robot" Lucas. I mean, yay he's good but do people really give change their trust in someone so quickly as that in reality? And that point takes me to the cliche love triangle, the one that never really resolves despite the "I love you" and the "No, but it's always been you". Actually, I just won't get into that one. There were good points to the book, don't get me wrong. The neurological idea on which the story is built is different to some things I've read, and the concept was somewhat interesting and developed well. I didn't dislike The Killables, I just think it might be better suited towards teens who maybe haven't yet had as much exposure to the many other dystopian teen fics around. It's got a good storyline and all the right dystopian elements for a YA book, that perhaps just get repetitive after reading similar feeling books for five years straight.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kayleigh {K-Books}

    The Killables Review on K-Books It's no surprise to anyone how much I adore dystopia novels. It's one of my favourite genres and I have read and loved every single dystopia book I have read. I have heard so much about Gemma Malley before and have heard her dystopia novels are amazing. This is the first book by Gemma Malley I have read and I was really impressed with her writing and ideas. Evil has been eradicated. The part of the brain that has to do with emotion and aggression, the amygdala, has The Killables Review on K-Books It's no surprise to anyone how much I adore dystopia novels. It's one of my favourite genres and I have read and loved every single dystopia book I have read. I have heard so much about Gemma Malley before and have heard her dystopia novels are amazing. This is the first book by Gemma Malley I have read and I was really impressed with her writing and ideas. Evil has been eradicated. The part of the brain that has to do with emotion and aggression, the amygdala, has been removed and when living in The City everything is perfect. But Evie feels things. Does that mean she is evil? All she wants is to be good. Good enough for her family. Good enough for her city but the more she tries to be good the more she starts to dream and feel. She and Raffy know that they are 'evil' from the cities standards but when Raffy gets labelled a K she knows that she needs to get him out of the city before something horrible happens. Escaping with him she is forced into a world that she always thought was dangerous. But is the real danger outside of The City or in it? I really enjoyed The Killables. As a Psychology graduate I loved the part that included the amygdala and the parts of the brain to do with emotion. It eased my inner psych geek. I loved that it had a scientific basis of it. I also loved Gemma's writing style. It was an amazing world and Gemma really sucks you in right from the start and then doesn't let you go until you are finished. This book reminded me of Delirium at the start with the whole 'emotion is evil' part but it soon became a lot more original and I found the book really difficult to put down. I really loved Evie's character. The Killables is really the story of Evie's self discovery. Of discovering what is evil. Of her discovering teh difference between what she has always been taught and what she is now learning to be true. I loved her and identified with her and I am looking forward to book 2 to find out more about her. Raffy was the guy that I was convinced would be the love interest... and he is. I liked Raffy he was sweet and all but the more I read the more he really annoyed me. This was such a change for me as if any character annoys me it is usually the main girl. In this one it was Raffy. He was stroppy and always quite mean and cold to Evie that I found myself liking his brother, the one left behind more and more. I am very much looking forward to seeing how this plays out in the next books in the series. The Killables was a great start to a series. It was a fantastic fast-paced, action-packed dystopia novel and I am really looking forward to reading more. It has aspects of other dystopia novels in there (Delirium and Uninvited) but I really enjoyed every moment of it. A definite must-read. "Imagination shows an ability to lie, to pretend the world is different than it is."

  13. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    I seem to be irresistibly drawn to YA dystopian reads - and this was one of the best I've read in a long time, the beginning of a new series that looks like it will shape up to be every bit as good as The Declaration trilogy. Gemma Malley writes so well, and is expert at drawing a vivid world peopled with strong young characters. This one is set in The City - a walled society set up after the end of the Horrors, where the Evils lurk outside the gates and people's lives are ruled by the System pr I seem to be irresistibly drawn to YA dystopian reads - and this was one of the best I've read in a long time, the beginning of a new series that looks like it will shape up to be every bit as good as The Declaration trilogy. Gemma Malley writes so well, and is expert at drawing a vivid world peopled with strong young characters. This one is set in The City - a walled society set up after the end of the Horrors, where the Evils lurk outside the gates and people's lives are ruled by the System presided over by the Brother. Citizens are classified A to D, but sometimes K - when they are made to disappear altogether. It's a fairly well-worn story - Evie secretly loves Raffy, which is totally against the rules, and when he is due to be classified a K they escape the City and join up with a rebel force, finding out the truth about the world they used to inhabit. There's a great deal more depth than that though - people turn out not to be what they appear on the surface, and the story twists and turns beautifully. An excellent read, thoroughly enjoyed by this adult - looking forward to the next one. If you enjoyed Gemma Malley's first series, or The Hunger Games, or Lauren Oliver's Delirium, you'll love it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lucy

    I thought the idea of this book was amazing and so different however I don't think the way it came across fullfilled it full potential as how good it could have been. For example I found the book very slow and whenever something shocking was meant to be revealed it was said in such a boring and casual way that it made it less shocking and less exciting. It would have been nice if we could have got to know how Raffy felt more as I felt I couldnt love the relationship between Raffy and Evie becaus I thought the idea of this book was amazing and so different however I don't think the way it came across fullfilled it full potential as how good it could have been. For example I found the book very slow and whenever something shocking was meant to be revealed it was said in such a boring and casual way that it made it less shocking and less exciting. It would have been nice if we could have got to know how Raffy felt more as I felt I couldnt love the relationship between Raffy and Evie because I didnt know enough about Raffy. I prefer the relationship with Evie and Lucas because I felt I knew Lucas better. Overall I did enjoy this book even though it took me quite a while to read. However I definatly prefer the Declaration trilogy by Gemma Malley and I reccommend that if you want to read any of Gemma Malley's books you should start there.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cate

    Things that made me give it one star: it is based on a wikipedia article, the 'scientific evidence' is taken out of context, the timeline doesn't fit, there is ZERO character development, the 'lovetriangle' is ridiculus, the main character is dispensable and lastly: I could not make myself care for anyone in this book. It seemed like an interesting book but it completely fell flat. Thankfully it was a fast read because you could skip the endless pages of the main character rehashing her inner dia Things that made me give it one star: it is based on a wikipedia article, the 'scientific evidence' is taken out of context, the timeline doesn't fit, there is ZERO character development, the 'lovetriangle' is ridiculus, the main character is dispensable and lastly: I could not make myself care for anyone in this book. It seemed like an interesting book but it completely fell flat. Thankfully it was a fast read because you could skip the endless pages of the main character rehashing her inner dialog over and over.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Beverley

    Intriguing plot, but so poorly written. There was no build up of the story, it seemed to be just thrown at you all at once. Lacked any suspense, and the plot could be guessed early on. I persevered, but will not be reading the sequel.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    The theme of love within this book does my head in, and other than the main characters being ridiculously stupid at times, it is a great read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brodie

    The basic premise reminded me a bit of Delirium... only completely opposite. In Delirium, people are cured of love by an operation to their brain. In The Killables, it's the same scenario, but with evil being the object of removal from a person. Every child at birth is forced to undergo the operation which removes the part of their brain that is said to be the source of evil - of corruption and ill desires. Citizens are ranked with a number - A, B, C, D or K. You want to be as close to A as poss The basic premise reminded me a bit of Delirium... only completely opposite. In Delirium, people are cured of love by an operation to their brain. In The Killables, it's the same scenario, but with evil being the object of removal from a person. Every child at birth is forced to undergo the operation which removes the part of their brain that is said to be the source of evil - of corruption and ill desires. Citizens are ranked with a number - A, B, C, D or K. You want to be as close to A as possible, because they're the good ones, those who follow the rules and haven't allowed for darkness to overtake them. But labels can be changed. People can move up or down on the scale. Those moved down are outwardly shamed and ridiculed. But are they really as evil as the 'Brother' claims? Those labelled a K are too far gone, completely overtaken by evil and they're never seen again. Where do they go? Evie is about to found out... but is it her or someone close to her with the dangerous new label? I guess you'll have to read the book to find out! There is a fair bit of 'info dumping' in the first quarter. I know some people have a problem with that, but I actually like it because with these type of societies, I'm always wanting to know more about the history and science of their world. I found it helpful to have all the information laid out for me early in the novel, so we know the kind of twisted environment Evie has grown up in and why it's affected her in the way it has. She's heavily under the Brother's influence and believes there is evil festering inside of her, so she works hard at trying to suffocate those dangerous thoughts. But she can't change who she is, much as she tries, and as the novel progresses we see her slowly break free from her beliefs. At times I wished she had more inner fire and strength, but she obviously can't change overnight. Her entire world and belief system has been turned inside out. She does grow a bit stronger by the end of the novel, where it's clear she's a changed girl. But there's still plenty of opportunity for growth in the sequel. Raffy is the main love interest, but I'm afraid to say he got on my nerves most of the time. More often than not he's hostile and sarcastic. I can definitely understand where his anger stems from, he's been treated unfairly his entire life and there's been so much hate and rage building up inside him. Understandably, he's wary of certain claims and actions his seemingly emotionless brother has made, trust is not something that comes easy to him. But his attitude and constant cynicism made me want to kick him. A lot. And I can't say I really feel the chemistry between him and Evie, especially for having such a long history together. Moments he shares with her when he's more tolerable, they just didn't have the desired impact on me to make me believe in their love. Lucas, on the other hand, is the brother who intrigued me the most. At first, you'd be forgiven for not giving him a second thought, but as you learn more about him, carefully hidden layers rise to the surface, and he pulls you in deeper and deeper. You want to know what moulded him into the person he is, what emotions truly lay behind those cold, blank eyes. Is he really as robotic as he appears? He's probably the one I'm most looking forward to seeing in the sequel, because there's complexities to his character I want to explore more. Not to mention I'm hoping he becomes even more central in Evie's life. Although his age was kind of jarring, I thought he was younger than what I discovered halfway through! The plot did engage me, not once did I set it aside because I was bored or uninterested. But there was just something... missing. I think maybe I didn't form a complete connection with Evie (and certainly Raffy). I can't really pinpoint it. I enjoyed it, I just didn't love it. And that's probably why I rated it a 3.5 rather than a 4. I see 3.5 as more like than love. But I still absolutely recommend it! The Killables presents a fantastically crafted world, Gemma Malley transports you right into the heart of this twisted, futuristic society made real by the solid foundations she's built it on. Horrifying truths come to light as Evie explores beyond the Brother's reach, but can she and her new friends right the wrongs he has inflicted upon the City? Layers, mystery and a touch of romance, The Killables makes for an engaging addition to dystopian shelves!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tenille Macgregor

    ***MINOR SPOLIERS*** Browsing through the bookshelves, I was looking for something new to read when I stumbled upon this little gem. The title was what originally caught my attention so I grabbed it off the shelf and flipped it over to find out a little bit more. I knew immediately after reading the premise of the story, that this was something I just had to read! So that day I bought myself a copy, and dug straight into it when I got home. Now keep in mind I haven't read a lot of books told from ***MINOR SPOLIERS*** Browsing through the bookshelves, I was looking for something new to read when I stumbled upon this little gem. The title was what originally caught my attention so I grabbed it off the shelf and flipped it over to find out a little bit more. I knew immediately after reading the premise of the story, that this was something I just had to read! So that day I bought myself a copy, and dug straight into it when I got home. Now keep in mind I haven't read a lot of books told from third person, but in this case, I think it worked out quite well for the most part. Other parts not so much, so for that very reason I've rated it 4 out of 5 stars. Despite this, it was still a very enjoyable and thought-provoking read! It really makes you question/wonder where the origin of 'evil' truly resonates. If you love Dystopian Novels like I do, you’ll definitely enjoy this one! Most of the story unfolds through Eevie's perspective, which helped me get a proper feel for the character. On the other hand though, I felt as though there wasn't enough development within certain characters to make me feel much of anything for them. I feel as though this goes for Raffy (even though he is also one of the main characters and love interests.) I liked him enough in the beginning because he wasn't afraid to question things that he was unsure of. He fought to discover the truth behind the world he was living in. But I would have liked to see him mature a little bit more as the plot progressed because at times he came off a little bit too possessive/clingy, not to mention temperamental. In some situations his actions/feelings are completely justifiable because of the harsh rules/laws he is constricted to, but I still would have liked to see him grow a little bit more. Same thing for Eevie too. Personally, the character I was most intrigued by was Lucas. I found his 'emotionless' exterior to be very unnerving, and at one point I had even convinced myself that maybe he was a robot after all! Haha! Anyway, his character always kept me interested and I was constantly compelled to find out more about him and what his true intentions/motives were. Was he good? Or was he Evil? Linus and Martha were also very interesting characters too. Just like Lucas, there was so much more to them than meets the eye. All I can say without giving too much away is that they had rich back stories, which made them all the more lively. I’m not too sure on were I stand with Linus at this point in time though…Is he good or is he evil? I can’t quite tell… He has been good so far… but I’m still a little shady of him. Now onto the ‘Evils’ that live beyond the ‘safety’ of the city walls. The truth behind them was VERY chilling. The kind of chilling that makes the hairs on the back of your neck stand up. I think what made it worse, is that’s its not all that hard to imagine a society that operates like this one. It’s a society that covers up what it doesn’t what to be seen. The horrors are easy to compare to our modern day society. Cults are the perfect example of that because that’s exactly what the City is like. A single leader manipulates the people of his/her community to believe that the way they are living, is the only way to live. That what they stand for, and everything they do is for the greater good of its people. But it’s all under false pretenses. The real reason cult leader’s control people is because they are power hungry, and this is exactly what ‘The Brother’ is. Everything they (cult leaders) do is for their own personal gain, and unfortunately in this situation, ‘the Evils’ are the ones who suffer the most. Gemma Malley does an outstanding job of presenting a world that is all too frighteningly close to the world we live in, so I congratulate her on that. All in all, I’m VERY excited to read book 2 ‘The Disappearances.’ The sneak preview sounds very promising and if it’s anything like the first, I know I’m sure to enjoy it. ----- Phew… Wow… That was a really long review! If you read the complete thing, thank you for sticking it out with me until the very end. HAPPY READING!! :)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Brooke Walker

    I recently read the book 'The Killables' by Gemma Malley, because it caught my eye in the library and I thought it sounded interesting, and relates to the topic we're studying in English class. "The Killables" is a dystopian fiction, set in the future where a power-hungry man has established a 'city' in order to eradicate evil from the world - therefore leaving the people as mindless puppets to do his duties. He has told the people that everywhere else in the world has been destroyed, and is pat I recently read the book 'The Killables' by Gemma Malley, because it caught my eye in the library and I thought it sounded interesting, and relates to the topic we're studying in English class. "The Killables" is a dystopian fiction, set in the future where a power-hungry man has established a 'city' in order to eradicate evil from the world - therefore leaving the people as mindless puppets to do his duties. He has told the people that everywhere else in the world has been destroyed, and is patrolled by "Evils", those who are so evil they wreak havoc, and eat people. The novel follows Evie, who, like in all Dystopian novels, has found herself unhappy in her society, and wants to escape and rebel. Her and her secret boyfriend, finally escape the city and its regimen, only to find out the truth about the world. It's a novel that had me up reading for hours, because there were so many plot twists and I really wanted to finish it and figure it all out. This book fits into the Bingo Board category, "A book relating to themes we've studied throughout the year", as it is a Dystopian novel. I quite enjoyed this category, and the genre of Dystopia because it's like looking into a whole other world, one where things are different, and I guess I like to learn about that. My favourite quote from this book is not spoken by a character, but expressed by the author. "Imagination shows an ability to lie, to pretend the world is different than it is." I liked this quote because it's true - and relatable. People often disappear into their own heads, lying to themselves, about the world. And since this book was a dystopian fiction, it fits in perfectly. The citizens are constantly lying to themselves to fit in, using their imaginations to pretend their world is perfect - which is one reason why I liked it. I also enjoyed this quote because I often feel the same way. I lie to myself to believe that I live in a place where I can grow up and follow my dreams, whereas that's not always true. A character I found was by far my favourite character was "Lucas", Raffy's brother and Evie's match (Her parents and his parents put them together to marry), a perfect citizen and a very high ranking official. Lucas was my favourite character because, for all his life since his father died, he had acted like a robot. Expressionless and emotionless... But only because he had to protect his brother. Inside, Lucas was helping people by warning them before they were about to get killed (He was the Leader's right-hand-man) and was a very good person. He was my favourite character because he was selfless and dedicated, someone I would easily like. He's also very sacrificial - He was in love with Evie, however let her be, because his brother loved her too. In all, Lucas was my favourite because he was kind, considerate and a brave human, and I admired him for that. Something I learned from this book was that there is no "good" and "evil". It's the choices people make, and their actions can be read as "good or evil." Throughout the book, the Great Leader occasionally tried to destroy evil for good, by taking out the part of the brain that contained "Evil." However, it was discovered that part was the ability to choose, so no-one is actually truly evil - Evil doesn't exist.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gemma (Passion for Novels)

    Like my reviews? See more at http://passionfornovels.blogspot.co.uk/ I really enjoyed this book, it is an interesting take on a supposedly Utopian future world. Where the hero has to be convinced that the System is evil too. I can tell this triolgy of books is going to be really good and it has been set up for what I can imagine will be a very exciting second book. Malley has created a well developed world in this book and has left it open ready for the second one to take flight. At the start it Like my reviews? See more at http://passionfornovels.blogspot.co.uk/ I really enjoyed this book, it is an interesting take on a supposedly Utopian future world. Where the hero has to be convinced that the System is evil too. I can tell this triolgy of books is going to be really good and it has been set up for what I can imagine will be a very exciting second book. Malley has created a well developed world in this book and has left it open ready for the second one to take flight. At the start it was a little slow, but I always find that with dystopians, how are you going to eriadicate the dystopian world if you don't know what it is? The concept of this world is brilliant, a world where everyone is labelled according to how 'good' they are A is the best which Lucas, and then our heroine who is currently a B. Then there's Raffy; Lucas' brother who is about to become a K. No one ever sees the K's again and its a nice touch by Malley that we know what K stands for right from the start compared to the characters, obviously its 'killable' The main character, whom we follow is Evie who is scared she is evil because of the recurring dreams she keeps having of a man holding her in her arms. Evie is a very strong female character at times but is lead very easily by Raffy. As you know from my other reviews I love secondary characters and in this novel the one that stood out for me was Linus, I won't tell you too much about him though, don't want to give it away. He is a very strong character who is quite witty and clearly intelligent, we see his true nature really come through at the end because he is a very secretive narrator to the main characters and the reader. Quite often the reader might question his true nature. I found myself really disliking Evie's mother, which I find a lot in dystopian fiction -mothers are not nice. Perhaps if this wasn't the case the children wouldn't need to rebel? Who knows? And although Lucas and Raffy's mother were not mentioned I found myself disliking her too. But, being brought up in the system maybe they aren't to blame. I did like the concept of the 'evils' which Malley has developed in the novel. They are there to evoke fear into the citizens of the city to make them shy away from rebelling. But when the truth of the 'evils' comes to light? Well you'll just have to read it for that twist. At times I felt I couldn't put this down, there were times where the action was riveting and others I just wanted to read on to find out the truth about the system. It has a cheeky bit of science in there, where you find out a little about the brain and an interesting extract taken from Wikipedia at the very beginning. I really enjoyed this novel, but I think the best is yet to come from this series, I will definitely be trying to get my hands on the next one. Unfortunately I will have to wait til March 2013 for that! Malley has done an excellent job and it is well worth a read. Because I can't wait til 2013 I'm trying out her other dystopian trilogy of which The Declaration is the first in the series.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bex

    If I had read The Killables when it was first published rather than now, after a whole host of incredible, original and addictive stories just like it had already graced my shelves, I think I would have liked it a lot more. So with that in mind, let's talk about what's great about this book. The Killables is set in a time where everything runs by the book. If you have evil within you, they will find it (hidden in the part of the brain known as the amygdala) and they will eradicate it (meaning yo If I had read The Killables when it was first published rather than now, after a whole host of incredible, original and addictive stories just like it had already graced my shelves, I think I would have liked it a lot more. So with that in mind, let's talk about what's great about this book. The Killables is set in a time where everything runs by the book. If you have evil within you, they will find it (hidden in the part of the brain known as the amygdala) and they will eradicate it (meaning you) by sending you outside of the walls with all of the other evil people who will probably kill you. You become this breed of unlucky once you've been categorised by the system; the categories run from A (total suck up) through to D (social outcast) and then a K is thrown in for those people who are just beyond fixing (brain washing). I like the idea. It's definitely not the most original or exciting, in fact it ticks all of the typical, expected dystopian boxes - I guess it doesn't break the mould of dystopian YA. But it's cool, and the writing style kept me hooked actually which is great. However, I struggled with Evie. Not only does she get herself trapped in a horrible love triangle, but she's also insufferably boring. She has very little character, which makes her very difficult to become attached to and she makes the most ridiculous decisions - who kisses a boy (who two minutes ago you hated, by the way) and believes every word that he tells you (despite him being a callous jerk your whole life before this moment). I just can't relate to stories in which characters make unbelievable moves like this. You just wouldn't blindly believe a jerk, nor would you be kissing him (particularly when you like his brother and were kissing him the chapter before!). I won't say I'm a romance reader at heart, so maybe this is why, but the implausibility of it just really annoyed me. Nevertheless, the story moves at a really good pace and you do feel compelled to continue because it's written nicely. But are these characters you'll care about? Definitely not from my point of view. I think this is just a case of "not for me", I'm sure many other readers will enjoy this (and definitely would have when it hadn't been topped by lots of fantastic YA dystopians like now), but I don't think I could venture back into this world.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emy

    This book was pretty good.It was not excellent,but I've still enjoyed it.I didn't really like the love relationship that Evie and Raphael had.I would have better chosen Lucas -by the way,this name is sooo common ! Why does every author use this name for the "perfect boy" ?.I would have chosen Lucas because Raphael seemed to be really annoying at some parts.I hated it when he didn't want to entertain Evie,as Lucas could do.I hated it when Raphael was getting angry too fast and it seemed just like This book was pretty good.It was not excellent,but I've still enjoyed it.I didn't really like the love relationship that Evie and Raphael had.I would have better chosen Lucas -by the way,this name is sooo common ! Why does every author use this name for the "perfect boy" ?.I would have chosen Lucas because Raphael seemed to be really annoying at some parts.I hated it when he didn't want to entertain Evie,as Lucas could do.I hated it when Raphael was getting angry too fast and it seemed just like he would have blamed Eve for everything.The only thing that I loved at Rahpael was his appearece .I just loved it ! But I loved Lucas' too .Perfect blonde hair and perfect behaviour .Anyway,at first I loved Raphael.Evie was...quite perplexed.And obsessed with being good.Yes,I think I have a problem with the characters.The story was pretty good,but it did not impress me .Well,it did impress me,but not very hard.I knew the end of the book without reading it .So sorry that Lucas had to stay in the City,though :).It wasn't really that bad though,because I am excited for the next book .I really think it will be better :).I give this book 4 stars.Respect for Gemma Malley ! :)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Manda Graham

    I have read one book by Gemma Malley before, The Declaration, which I really enjoyed. The Killables is based around a really clever premise, but some how falls a bit flat. There were two reasons for this from my point of view: 1. the characters, particularly Lucas and Raffy just didn't come to life and Raffy inparticular seemed to sculk around like a moody teenager the majority of the time, I just couldn't see the attraction 2. the length of the book, it seemed to drift on during some of the cha I have read one book by Gemma Malley before, The Declaration, which I really enjoyed. The Killables is based around a really clever premise, but some how falls a bit flat. There were two reasons for this from my point of view: 1. the characters, particularly Lucas and Raffy just didn't come to life and Raffy inparticular seemed to sculk around like a moody teenager the majority of the time, I just couldn't see the attraction 2. the length of the book, it seemed to drift on during some of the chapters and I found myself skim reading whole sections. Not a favourite, but not terrible, I may read the second in the trilogy, but I may not.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kavita

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I know it's a little thing, but the timeline really irritated me and threw off ability to just go with the flow of the story. It took them 2 days to get to Base Camp from the City. Then on the way back they left in an afternoon- and only got their plans together that morning? Also, the society in the City was only around for a couple decades- how could there be such ingrained traditions like the matched couples? Overall, there were just a lot of things that didn't add up in the plot and all toge I know it's a little thing, but the timeline really irritated me and threw off ability to just go with the flow of the story. It took them 2 days to get to Base Camp from the City. Then on the way back they left in an afternoon- and only got their plans together that morning? Also, the society in the City was only around for a couple decades- how could there be such ingrained traditions like the matched couples? Overall, there were just a lot of things that didn't add up in the plot and all together, they made me lost interest.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Charley

    The plot for this book was amazing!! Fantastic idea. I loved it!! It is such a shame that I could only give this book three stars because although the storyline was great, I neary did not even finish the book due to the characters being so unrelatable, especially Raffy. He always acted so immature and the fact that Evie still saw no fault in him, despite all the whining and tantrums he had annoyed me to the extent that I nearly shut the book! But overall I am glad I kept reading and I hope to see The plot for this book was amazing!! Fantastic idea. I loved it!! It is such a shame that I could only give this book three stars because although the storyline was great, I neary did not even finish the book due to the characters being so unrelatable, especially Raffy. He always acted so immature and the fact that Evie still saw no fault in him, despite all the whining and tantrums he had annoyed me to the extent that I nearly shut the book! But overall I am glad I kept reading and I hope to see a sequel soon!!!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Paulina

    After reading some reviews based on this book before starting to read it, I honestly felt like I would hate the story and the book. And as soon as I saw the opening few pages and Wikipedia being listed as the source for a psychological explanation, I was ready to put the book down before I even started it. I’m glad I stuck around though, although this is definitely not a new favorite for me, and I had various problems with the book, story and Gemma’s chosen style I did enjoy the read and found i After reading some reviews based on this book before starting to read it, I honestly felt like I would hate the story and the book. And as soon as I saw the opening few pages and Wikipedia being listed as the source for a psychological explanation, I was ready to put the book down before I even started it. I’m glad I stuck around though, although this is definitely not a new favorite for me, and I had various problems with the book, story and Gemma’s chosen style I did enjoy the read and found it entertaining. The story begins with rather slowly explaining this dystopian world with Evie wondering if she is evil as she keeps having vivid dreams. In this world after the “Horrors” occur a newfound prophet if you will, or a cult leader how I see him, sets about to start a City where the population is rid of their evil tendencies. A self-sufficient City that has a ranking system of how good a person is, a System that watches over them and ranks them how it sees fit. Dear Evie is ranked as a B, meaning she is a good person, who is going to be marrying Lucas labelled as an A the best of the best. Then there are C’s who are watched more closely and then there are the D’s who are at the bottom for their “goodness” being watched and observed closely by the System to see if they have evil tendencies and if so they are to be classed as a K. As far as the townspeople are aware those that are labelled as a K are taken away where they receive a Second Baptism, never to be seen again. The Second Baptism refers to the removal of the amygdala, a small almond-shaped matter in your brain that is responsible for processing memory, decision making, and emotional responses. The amygdala is removed as the Leader believes that by removing this part of the brain humans are unable to carry out evil. In terms of the K’s however the amygdala grows back, I presume because they are just so evil that it grows back up and has to be removed again. Which… I don’t even know where to start with this theory. I’m not going to go into detail in this review as it will spoil the rest of the series for those interested but from the start, I couldn’t get on board with this theory. I mean, the brain is a fascinating organ and removing a part of it surely would not be such a great idea. I want to touch back on the classification of the people within the City again. The people are labelled those letters based on the System and they have to wear their letters on the clothing- reminds you of anything? Not only that but depending on your ranking is where you sit within the town meeting. What a horrible system. I found the story and what happened, and the characters incredibly over-used in previous dystopian novels that I’ve read. A teenage girl, living in a society because the world as they knew it before was destroyed, being controlled by not only her strict parents but also those within her community and the System. A love triangle, wanting to run away, believing that there is something wrong with them because they are the only ones able to see that the way that they are living is not right. I mean. If there was a recipe for a dystopian novel that would be it. This book reminded me very much of Matched. The characters in this book were there. While I was reading I was getting frustrated by how the characters seemed undeveloped and just seemed to have been placed there without any realness to them, but after finishing the book I realised that Gemma’s way of writing and telling this story give hardly any information while at the same time giving plenty about each of the characters. I was able to judge the characters on my own accord which wouldn’t have worked if it were done by different authors. The writing was simple and enjoyable. I was able to finish this book quickly and although I wasn’t hyped up for this book and wasn’t too thrilled about reading basically the skeleton of previous dystopian novels with a different twist, I was nevertheless hooked. I couldn’t wait to read what happened next. Before I start on the next book in the series, I really hope that Gemma realises that you do not have to use dreams as a propellant in the story. I was sick and tired of having to read about Evie’s dreams!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. What can I say other than this book and the series is amazing. Focusing on this first book, I loved it. I can see a few people didn't like the aspect of a dystopian future story including a love triangle romance, but that's what made me especially love this book and the two that follow. The world has been destroyed and a city was built to keep survivors safe from outside the walls, where the evils are. The city is controlled by the Brother and everyone is ranked, A being the most respected rankin What can I say other than this book and the series is amazing. Focusing on this first book, I loved it. I can see a few people didn't like the aspect of a dystopian future story including a love triangle romance, but that's what made me especially love this book and the two that follow. The world has been destroyed and a city was built to keep survivors safe from outside the walls, where the evils are. The city is controlled by the Brother and everyone is ranked, A being the most respected ranking. Those ranked K, the worst ranking of all, disappear never to be seen or heard from again. The system that controls the City's people determines their rank. People must get on with their work duties and show no sign of emotion. Evie, ranked C, must marry Lucas, an A, who shows no signs of emotions, and is like a robot to Evie. She loves Raffy, a troublesome, not very respected boy, who happens to be Lucas' brother, but their love is forbidden, so they sneak out of their house every night and meet in their secret spot, risking their lives as they do so. If anyone found out, they would be instantly ranked a K. When Raffy finds a flaw in the system, a communication device, he is set to be made a K, leaving Lucas, his older brother, no choice but to be truthful with Evie. Lucas had to put on a show, acting as though he had no emotions or feelings towards anything or anyone in order to gain the Brother's trust, secretly protecting Raffy and Evie, hiding their secret meet ups from the system. He arranges for Evie and Raffy to escape the City, where their journey really begins and terrible truths come out. From then on, you learn more about why the City was really created, who the Evils are and why they are like they are, and much more. The story is really worth the read, it has amazing characters, a very original and almost complex storyline and a romance aspect to top it off. The two books that follow are also no disappointment.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Molly Looby

    Before we begin, this is first of my book reviews. I will write a review every time I finish a book. If you want to see what I’m reading right now or any book I’ve already read this year, please look to the right-hand side of the screen where there is a book list. There are however, no other book reviews, as this is the first. I’d also like to just mention that every time I use an example I have found them in the novel – in this case ‘The Killables’ by Gemma Malley. A Spoiler Free Bit About the B Before we begin, this is first of my book reviews. I will write a review every time I finish a book. If you want to see what I’m reading right now or any book I’ve already read this year, please look to the right-hand side of the screen where there is a book list. There are however, no other book reviews, as this is the first. I’d also like to just mention that every time I use an example I have found them in the novel – in this case ‘The Killables’ by Gemma Malley. A Spoiler Free Bit About the Book This morning I finished Gemma Malley’s ‘The Killables’, a teenage fiction novel set in dystopian London which is called the City which is run by the Brother. In the City evil has been eradicated by the removal of the amygdala – the part of the brain the people of the City believe evil lives – in a procedure called the New Baptism. Everyone has a label from A to D which indicates your ‘goodness’ level, I suppose. ‘A’ being that there is no evil in you whatsoever and ‘D’ being ‘deviant’ or one to watch. The D’s are despised by others in their community and suspected of evil. If worse comes to worse and the System believes your amygdala is growing back and you have the capacity for evil you are labelled a ‘K’. The K’s are sent off to be reconditioned and have a second New Baptism. But the K’s are never seen again. The novel follows a teenager called Evie. I believe she’s sixteen or seventeen. She works for the System changing people’s labels. Evie believes that she may have the capacity for evil as the world she lives in has made her anxious and timid (or that’s how I read into it). Evie worries that she isn’t like everyone else (as we all do at some point in our lives). My Review I must say, I struggled throughout ‘The Killables’ to connect with Evie, the protagonist, but also most of the main characters. I sympathised with them at points but it wasn’t enough and I at last began to like Evie at the very end of the novel. I was tempted many times to put it down and not finish it because I’m a character girl. I like character driven novels vs plot driven novels and I felt this was a plot driven novel. What kept me hanging on was the plot itself. I loved the whole concept. I’ve read many dystopian novels (I love them) but I loved that this one was different, which isn’t that easy to find. So I stuck around for the plot, the characters annoying me all the way, which I found very odd. I’m not saying the character development was bad or that they were unrealistic, not at all. I just couldn’t identify with them and in their situation would’ve made very different decisions. Sometimes characters’ decision making drives me crazy (if you’ve ever read the ‘Hush, Hush’ trilogy or ‘The Immortals Series’ you’ll know what I mean). ‘The Killables’ made me feel like this at times. Another issue I had was Gemma Malley’s writing style. Again, I’m not saying it’s bad and that she’s a bad author because she isn’t by any standards. It just wasn’t my cup of tea. It was more like she’d offered me black coffee with sugar and I’d drank it to the bottom when I really wanted white tea without sugar. First of all, it’s written in the third person (for those of you unaware, the third person is saying: “Evie’s heart thudded”, almost like there is an omnipotent narrator telling the story whereas the first person is saying: “My heart thudded”, where the protagonist is telling the story themselves). Third person makes me feel distant. It’s just a personal feeling and a taste and I think it’s why I had a hard time connecting with Evie – because I felt we really were living in different worlds whereas when I read first person I feel like I’m there with them. Before you get any ideas, I’m not saying I hate the third person – may I remind you that Harry Potter is written in the third person. I’d just always pick the first person if given a choice. I guess having written in nothing but the first person for four years can’t have helped either. What really irritated me, like a fly buzzing around your ear but you just can’t catch it, was Malley’s incessant use of adverbs. If you haven’t read my previous posts you won’t know about my hatred for adverbs (which are words describing a verb such as “she reddened awkwardly”, awkwardly being the adverb). I can’t stand them at all, but in my mind to use them in a novel is a writing sin. Malley either doesn’t know this or disagrees because ‘The Killables’ is just littered with adverbs. In more than one instance I found that double adverbs had been used. Two next to each other! Like using one wasn’t bad enough. I tried to look for an example but the book’s 370 pages long so no luck. Instead I found an example of what I mean when I scream about my adverb loathing. “He stared at Linus uncomprehendingly”. There must have been a better word for Malley to use. “Uncomprehendingly” almost sounds like a made up word. Another example I found was “Evie said loudly”. Is it just me, or would “Evie said, raising her voice” sound better? Or even “Evie yelled”, “Evie shouted” or “Evie called”. The word “loudly” adds nothing you can’t get through other and much better words. Adverbs, throughout the novel, take away from the connection to the characters and add to the readers’ distance felt between them and also slow down the plot. Adverb rant over, I promise. Evaluation Plot Idea – 9/10 – I loved the plot itself and the idea of the City and the problems that came with it. Way Plot was Pursued – 6/10 – at various points I found the storytelling just a little too odd for my liking. Also, I thought there was too much detail at the very beginning which made it seem slow to start. Characters – 2/10 – I understood them but I didn’t like them or care about them. I wouldn’t want to follow them to the end of the novel. Style – 1/10 – adverbs, adverbs, adverbs, plus third person distance. Pace – 8/10 – for the second half of the novel I thought the pace was perfect. However at the beginning the plot was slow, it didn’t last too long, but I still had to endure it. Would I recommend it? - I would if I believed you would enjoy this type of story and if you’re not all hung up on adverbs like me. So yes. Would I look up the author? - I know she’s written other novels that have received lots of praise, but I would not. This is just because she doesn’t write in my preferred style. No. All in all, ‘The Killables’ wasn’t a bad novel; it was even a good novel in places. It was a novel I had my problems with and that’s that.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rachael Mellor

    D.n.f at page 192. What a shit show. Having read Gemma malleys declaration series I was keen to read this, but the mere fact the book opened with a Wikipedia reference did not bode well. Here are the reasons I did not finish this book: 1. It's opens with a Wikipedia reference. The book is rife with scientific inaccuracies. The *least* she could have done is to get in touch with a neuroscientist or neuropsychologist and run these ideas by them, perhaps add some extra layers to the plot. 2. The book D.n.f at page 192. What a shit show. Having read Gemma malleys declaration series I was keen to read this, but the mere fact the book opened with a Wikipedia reference did not bode well. Here are the reasons I did not finish this book: 1. It's opens with a Wikipedia reference. The book is rife with scientific inaccuracies. The *least* she could have done is to get in touch with a neuroscientist or neuropsychologist and run these ideas by them, perhaps add some extra layers to the plot. 2. The book is full of contradictions and a timeline that makes no sense. For example it talks about removing the amygdalla (the "evil" part of the brain) but when they are captured later on, he removes the "chip"- what? 3. Awful character development. A girl living in these circumstances must have some balls to sneak out at night to meet her lover. But she doesn't have the balls to stand up for someone on the street because she's too scared? No character development. 4. This book if full of YA cliches. I just feel like YA writers are getting lazy and are churning out more and more books just for the sake of it. Love triangle, cheesy writing. If you want to read something similar but better, try Gemma malleys declaration series, or Lauren destefanos wither series. Much much better.

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