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A World-Class Education

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Designed to promote conversation about how to educate students for a rapidly changing, innovation-based world, this comprehensive and illuminating book from international education expert Vivien Stewart focuses on understanding what the world's best school systems are doing right for the purpose of identifying what U.S. schools at the national, state, and local level might Designed to promote conversation about how to educate students for a rapidly changing, innovation-based world, this comprehensive and illuminating book from international education expert Vivien Stewart focuses on understanding what the world's best school systems are doing right for the purpose of identifying what U.S. schools at the national, state, and local level might do differently and better.


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Designed to promote conversation about how to educate students for a rapidly changing, innovation-based world, this comprehensive and illuminating book from international education expert Vivien Stewart focuses on understanding what the world's best school systems are doing right for the purpose of identifying what U.S. schools at the national, state, and local level might Designed to promote conversation about how to educate students for a rapidly changing, innovation-based world, this comprehensive and illuminating book from international education expert Vivien Stewart focuses on understanding what the world's best school systems are doing right for the purpose of identifying what U.S. schools at the national, state, and local level might do differently and better.

30 review for A World-Class Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Armstrong

    Startling to learn that two of the world's leaders in education, as measured by international test scores, are a world apart in almost every sense. Finland's decentralized approach (students are not given an external assessment until the end of high school at grade 12) and Singapore's assessment-driven approach nonetheless produce superior results. But what should we take away from this? Perhaps that both countries appear to be more committed at a national level to rethinking and supporting Startling to learn that two of the world's leaders in education, as measured by international test scores, are a world apart in almost every sense. Finland's decentralized approach (students are not given an external assessment until the end of high school at grade 12) and Singapore's assessment-driven approach nonetheless produce superior results. But what should we take away from this? Perhaps that both countries appear to be more committed at a national level to rethinking and supporting education than is the US, which pays the idea lip service but fails to make the kind of important structural changes needed.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cathleen

    I read this book in preparation for my Fulbright Teachers for Global Classrooms Fellowship. Its a bit dated (already) but provides good comparisons of US and high-performing school systems throughout the world. Somehow everything that my home state has enacted goes against the grain of what high-performing systems do. Thats Arizona for you. 😕 I read this book in preparation for my Fulbright Teachers for Global Classrooms Fellowship. It’s a bit dated (already) but provides good comparisons of US and high-performing school systems throughout the world. Somehow everything that my home state has enacted goes against the grain of what high-performing systems do. That’s Arizona for you. 😕

  3. 4 out of 5

    Random

    The author's main objective is to provide a summary of the international educational systems in order to draw inferences for how one might improve educational outcomes through improved processes. I think this book is worth reading but I did have a few quibbles: 1. The book describes the educational systems of Singapore, Canada, Finland, and China with passing references to Australia, England, and a few others. I don't know why these countries happen to be the right ones to highlight apart from The author's main objective is to provide a summary of the international educational systems in order to draw inferences for how one might improve educational outcomes through improved processes. I think this book is worth reading but I did have a few quibbles: 1. The book describes the educational systems of Singapore, Canada, Finland, and China with passing references to Australia, England, and a few others. I don't know why these countries happen to be the right ones to highlight apart from them having high/improved PISA scores. It would have been more helpful for the author to explain why PISA is the right international benchmark or why other alternatives are worse. It would also have been helpful for the author to not focus on average differences in the PISA score as averages obfuscate substantial within-country heterogeneity. I would also have been more interested in learning whether particular practices/processes are more effective towards different parts of the student distribution. 2. The paper is aimed at making policy recommendations but does not sufficiently separate evidence that is correlation vs causation. For example, the book describes teacher autonomy in Finland as a contribution factor to its success. But that might not work in the US as well given the lack of relative population homogeneity. In other words, the educational systems we observe across the world are not random. 3. For a policy book, the research is poorly sourced. Many claims are stated without attribution. There are only 120 references which really isn't a lot for a 180 page book where each paragraph makes 2-3 factual claims.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Connor Oswald

    a great, quick handbook on comparative international education systems.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    I was introduced to this read through WorldView at UNC and Global Studies. The book highlights other countries who are making positive strides with their education system. I was able to pick a little and even a lot from the countries mentioned-Finland, Singapore, Shanghai, Canada, and it definitely made me think of ways we could improvise to get our education system headed in the right direction again.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Gwen

    The author points out models from around the world that address current issues in education. While at times it seems there is something not being said, the overall conclusions and ideas that Americans could draw from the models are great. The world is becoming more global, and we cannot live in our past "glory" without realizing we may need to change and continually seek improvement in the field of education.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Some good fodder for planning and envisioning the future of education in the United States. The author looks at the education systems in Singapore China Canada Finland and some developing countries. The need for a career ladder for teachers is one thing that strikes me as important for us to move forward .

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joe Thacker

    Too high level, too broad, didn't find myself learning anything. I wouldn't recommend reading this, I am wondering if I should even keep in on my bookshelf, I have a rule that if a book is so bad I toss it in the garbage, l prune my library garden!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    I have more to add about this book at a later time.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Fairchild

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ronaldo Bevan

  12. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tom

  14. 4 out of 5

    Stockfish

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Fisher

  16. 4 out of 5

    Yuri Scherbyna

  17. 4 out of 5

    Middlethought

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Schuttinger

  19. 4 out of 5

    Angie

  20. 4 out of 5

    Heather Meath

  21. 5 out of 5

    Eric Alcala

  22. 4 out of 5

    mamareadsalot

  23. 4 out of 5

    Beth P

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Gay

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tristan

  26. 4 out of 5

    John Levasseur

  27. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Mclain

  28. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kaywin Cottle

  30. 4 out of 5

    Shelby

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