counter create hit Sleeping Dogs: A true story of the Lindbergh baby kidnapping - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Sleeping Dogs: A true story of the Lindbergh baby kidnapping

Availability: Ready to download

A deathbed confession. A gun encased in concrete. And the possibility that both could have kept Bruno Richard Hauptmann from going to the electric chair for the kidnap and murder of Charles A. Lindbergh Jr. When journalist Michael Foldes hears the story of a family in the Hudson Valley of upstate New York who might have known the killers of the Lindbergh baby, he teases ou A deathbed confession. A gun encased in concrete. And the possibility that both could have kept Bruno Richard Hauptmann from going to the electric chair for the kidnap and murder of Charles A. Lindbergh Jr. When journalist Michael Foldes hears the story of a family in the Hudson Valley of upstate New York who might have known the killers of the Lindbergh baby, he teases out details that lead to a plausible and possible explanation of what Hauptmann said right up until his death: that he was innocent. 80 years ago, on March 1, 1932 ... On the night of March 1, 1932, the infant son of famed aviator Charles A. Lindbergh and his wife Anne Morrow, the daughter of a diplomat, was kidnapped from the family's hilltop estate in Hopewell, NJ. The ensuing investigation involved not only crime fighters at the highest levels, but also members of organized crime, small-time crooks and swindlers, politicians and hangers-on who surfaced from every quarter seeking their own measures of fame and fortune in the mournful glow of the flyer and his wife. A $50,000 ransom in "marked" gold notes was paid, but the boy was not returned. Then, on May 12, 1932, the decomposed corpse of a child was found and identified as Charles Lindbergh, Jr. The search for the kidnapper or kidnappers continued until September 19, 1934, when Bruno Richard Hauptmann, a German ex-convict living in the Bronx with his wife and son, was arrested after passing a gold note traced to the ransom. What was known as the Crime of the Century was followed by the Trial of the Century. Hauptmann was convicted and after several appeals, died in New Jersey's electric chair as the sole perpetrator of the crime. Nearly 50 years later, the deathbed confession of an old woman living in the Hudson Valley, and the subsequent discovery of a gun buried in the concrete floor of the chicken coop behind her house, led to a plausible explanation not of who committed the crime -- but of who didn't.


Compare

A deathbed confession. A gun encased in concrete. And the possibility that both could have kept Bruno Richard Hauptmann from going to the electric chair for the kidnap and murder of Charles A. Lindbergh Jr. When journalist Michael Foldes hears the story of a family in the Hudson Valley of upstate New York who might have known the killers of the Lindbergh baby, he teases ou A deathbed confession. A gun encased in concrete. And the possibility that both could have kept Bruno Richard Hauptmann from going to the electric chair for the kidnap and murder of Charles A. Lindbergh Jr. When journalist Michael Foldes hears the story of a family in the Hudson Valley of upstate New York who might have known the killers of the Lindbergh baby, he teases out details that lead to a plausible and possible explanation of what Hauptmann said right up until his death: that he was innocent. 80 years ago, on March 1, 1932 ... On the night of March 1, 1932, the infant son of famed aviator Charles A. Lindbergh and his wife Anne Morrow, the daughter of a diplomat, was kidnapped from the family's hilltop estate in Hopewell, NJ. The ensuing investigation involved not only crime fighters at the highest levels, but also members of organized crime, small-time crooks and swindlers, politicians and hangers-on who surfaced from every quarter seeking their own measures of fame and fortune in the mournful glow of the flyer and his wife. A $50,000 ransom in "marked" gold notes was paid, but the boy was not returned. Then, on May 12, 1932, the decomposed corpse of a child was found and identified as Charles Lindbergh, Jr. The search for the kidnapper or kidnappers continued until September 19, 1934, when Bruno Richard Hauptmann, a German ex-convict living in the Bronx with his wife and son, was arrested after passing a gold note traced to the ransom. What was known as the Crime of the Century was followed by the Trial of the Century. Hauptmann was convicted and after several appeals, died in New Jersey's electric chair as the sole perpetrator of the crime. Nearly 50 years later, the deathbed confession of an old woman living in the Hudson Valley, and the subsequent discovery of a gun buried in the concrete floor of the chicken coop behind her house, led to a plausible explanation not of who committed the crime -- but of who didn't.

28 review for Sleeping Dogs: A true story of the Lindbergh baby kidnapping

  1. 4 out of 5

    Doreen Petersen

    Fascinating book. There were so many holes in the initial investigation I don't feel the whole truth will ever come out. It is a good read. Fascinating book. There were so many holes in the initial investigation I don't feel the whole truth will ever come out. It is a good read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mimi Lee

    It is always interesting to me to take note of the stories in the news that move folks the most, the unsolved or potentially wrongly-"solved" tragedies that mark our shared cultural history in America. So it is no wonder I truly enjoyed Sleeping Dogs, it sheds new light on the scope and context of the Lindbergh baby kidnapping/murder and offers new case details that plainly suggest that the whole case might have been "solved" too quickly with the wrong man put to death for a crime he did not com It is always interesting to me to take note of the stories in the news that move folks the most, the unsolved or potentially wrongly-"solved" tragedies that mark our shared cultural history in America. So it is no wonder I truly enjoyed Sleeping Dogs, it sheds new light on the scope and context of the Lindbergh baby kidnapping/murder and offers new case details that plainly suggest that the whole case might have been "solved" too quickly with the wrong man put to death for a crime he did not commit. If you are a follower of the Lindbergh family story and tragedy, you HAVE to read this book. If you are not currently educated on the case, you HAVE to read this book. The details will haunt and prod you. You will question not only the hows and whys but the what ifs. You will wonder at the motivation not only of the kidnappers/killers of poor baby Lindbergh but of any legal "justice" system that can work so quickly to railroad a potentially innocent man right into the electric chair.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mike Foldes

    Author explores the personal history of three families in the Hudson Valley to validate the story given by an old woman to her caretakers that she and her husband were involved in the Lindbergh baby kidnapping. Based on interviews and research, this books makes a case not for who DID kill the Lindbergh baby, but for who didn't, adding yet another chapter in the growing mythology surrounding "the crime of the century," and the ensuing "trial of the century." Author explores the personal history of three families in the Hudson Valley to validate the story given by an old woman to her caretakers that she and her husband were involved in the Lindbergh baby kidnapping. Based on interviews and research, this books makes a case not for who DID kill the Lindbergh baby, but for who didn't, adding yet another chapter in the growing mythology surrounding "the crime of the century," and the ensuing "trial of the century."

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dana Schwalie

  6. 5 out of 5

    Marjo Rollin

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tammy LoBue

  8. 5 out of 5

    Toni

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lee

  10. 4 out of 5

    Vince

  11. 5 out of 5

    Steven L Miller

  12. 5 out of 5

    Monica Lee

  13. 4 out of 5

    Betsy

  14. 4 out of 5

    Gale Stanley

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marilyn

  16. 5 out of 5

    Toya Guyton

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  18. 5 out of 5

    Chayo

  19. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kim Wakfield

  21. 5 out of 5

    Isabella parker

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany Mclellan

  23. 5 out of 5

    Igrowastreesgrow

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brendan O'neill

  25. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Sedotto

  26. 5 out of 5

    Destiny

  27. 5 out of 5

    Betty R. Stewart

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jed

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.