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Living as Form: Socially Engaged Art from 1991-2011

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Over the past twenty years, an abundance of art forms have emerged that use aesthetics to affect social dynamics. These works are often produced by collectives or come out of a community context; they emphasize participation, dialogue, and action, and appear in situations ranging from theater to activism to urban planning to visual art to health care. Engaged with the text Over the past twenty years, an abundance of art forms have emerged that use aesthetics to affect social dynamics. These works are often produced by collectives or come out of a community context; they emphasize participation, dialogue, and action, and appear in situations ranging from theater to activism to urban planning to visual art to health care. Engaged with the texture of living, these art works often blur the line between art and life. This book offers the first global portrait of a complex and exciting mode of cultural production--one that has virtually redefined contemporary art practice. Living as Form grew out of a major exhibition at Creative Time in New York City. Like the exhibition, the book is a landmark survey of more than 100 projects selected by a thirty-person curatorial advisory team; each project is documented by a selection of color images. The artists include the Danish collective Superflex, who empower communities to challenge corporate interest; Turner Prize nominee Jeremy Deller, creator of socially and politically charged performance works; Women on Waves, who provide abortion services and information to women in regions where the procedure is illegal; and Santiágo Cirugeda, an architect who builds temporary structures to solve housing problems. Living as Form contains commissioned essays from noted critics and theorists who look at this phenomenon from a global perspective and broaden the range of what constitutes this form.


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Over the past twenty years, an abundance of art forms have emerged that use aesthetics to affect social dynamics. These works are often produced by collectives or come out of a community context; they emphasize participation, dialogue, and action, and appear in situations ranging from theater to activism to urban planning to visual art to health care. Engaged with the text Over the past twenty years, an abundance of art forms have emerged that use aesthetics to affect social dynamics. These works are often produced by collectives or come out of a community context; they emphasize participation, dialogue, and action, and appear in situations ranging from theater to activism to urban planning to visual art to health care. Engaged with the texture of living, these art works often blur the line between art and life. This book offers the first global portrait of a complex and exciting mode of cultural production--one that has virtually redefined contemporary art practice. Living as Form grew out of a major exhibition at Creative Time in New York City. Like the exhibition, the book is a landmark survey of more than 100 projects selected by a thirty-person curatorial advisory team; each project is documented by a selection of color images. The artists include the Danish collective Superflex, who empower communities to challenge corporate interest; Turner Prize nominee Jeremy Deller, creator of socially and politically charged performance works; Women on Waves, who provide abortion services and information to women in regions where the procedure is illegal; and Santiágo Cirugeda, an architect who builds temporary structures to solve housing problems. Living as Form contains commissioned essays from noted critics and theorists who look at this phenomenon from a global perspective and broaden the range of what constitutes this form.

30 review for Living as Form: Socially Engaged Art from 1991-2011

  1. 4 out of 5

    Randy

    Five out of the seven essays are very good and offer counterpoints to the challenging task of framing current social art forms. Endnotes from the essays are informative as well. Living As Form is profusely illustrated and includes an extensive section of projects in the latter half of the book. If you're interested in exploring social movements employing art strategies, this is a great place to start. Check out Creative Time on-line to get a feel for the organizations mission. http://creativetim Five out of the seven essays are very good and offer counterpoints to the challenging task of framing current social art forms. Endnotes from the essays are informative as well. Living As Form is profusely illustrated and includes an extensive section of projects in the latter half of the book. If you're interested in exploring social movements employing art strategies, this is a great place to start. Check out Creative Time on-line to get a feel for the organizations mission. http://creativetime.org/

  2. 5 out of 5

    hami

    “What strikes me is the fact that in our society, art has become something which is related only to objects and not to individuals, or to life. That art is something which is specialized or which is done by experts who are artists. But couldn't everyone's life become a work of art? Why should the lamp or the house be an art object, but not our life?” ― Michel Foucault The book is selection or archive of existing participatory and social artistic practices from around the world from 1990 to 2011. A “What strikes me is the fact that in our society, art has become something which is related only to objects and not to individuals, or to life. That art is something which is specialized or which is done by experts who are artists. But couldn't everyone's life become a work of art? Why should the lamp or the house be an art object, but not our life?” ― Michel Foucault The book is selection or archive of existing participatory and social artistic practices from around the world from 1990 to 2011. A good selection of essays (except one, that you will know when you read).

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jovanna

    I really enjoyed this book because of the introductory essays especially those by Teddy Cruz and Brian Holmes, they made just want to go out into the streets and act on so many things that are wrong with the world today. It provides a vast and diverges overview of socially engaged projects of the last 20 years, so things might need a bit of an update (or maybe erase altogether) such as election night when Obama won and a few others. Overall however it is a great resource of projects that have b I really enjoyed this book because of the introductory essays especially those by Teddy Cruz and Brian Holmes, they made just want to go out into the streets and act on so many things that are wrong with the world today. It provides a vast and diverges overview of socially engaged projects of the last 20 years, so things might need a bit of an update (or maybe erase altogether) such as election night when Obama won and a few others. Overall however it is a great resource of projects that have been committed to social change and the power and responsibility that art has.

  4. 5 out of 5

    J Teo

    Great essays and artworks. Must read for anyone interested in social practice art.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mary Louise Schumacher

    Please don't act out in the comments section of our web site about public art and/or placemaking controversies until you've taken in this book. From Creative Time. Quite a resource.

  6. 4 out of 5

    JinxLi

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mandy Hevener

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stacy Jo

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Lapalme

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cori

  11. 5 out of 5

    Elliott

  12. 5 out of 5

    Carlos Martinez

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shelley Whiting

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  15. 4 out of 5

    Becky

  16. 5 out of 5

    viktoria andersson

  17. 4 out of 5

    Barry

  18. 5 out of 5

    Derek Fenner

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ethan Pierce

  21. 4 out of 5

    Laura Voth

  22. 5 out of 5

    Carmen

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  24. 4 out of 5

    Christina Woodward

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mark Teh

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mariana Rebola

  27. 5 out of 5

    Priscilla Previl

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sherry Lee

  29. 5 out of 5

    Agnese Pundiņa

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kate Klein

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