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American Vampire, Vol. 4

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American Vampire flashes back to two very distinct points in American history. The first tale comes from the early 1800's with the "The Beast in the Cave" featuring art by the legendary Jordi Bernet (Torpedo, Jonah Hex). Learn about the original American Vampire, Skinner Sweet, and his involvement in the brutal Indian Wars, and an ancient evil hidden in the heart of the Ol American Vampire flashes back to two very distinct points in American history. The first tale comes from the early 1800's with the "The Beast in the Cave" featuring art by the legendary Jordi Bernet (Torpedo, Jonah Hex). Learn about the original American Vampire, Skinner Sweet, and his involvement in the brutal Indian Wars, and an ancient evil hidden in the heart of the Old West. Plus, more about the man Skinner used to call his best friend - James Book! The second tale comes straight from 1950s America, where American Vampire is terrorizing the suburbs with hot rods, teenyboppers and fangs! "Death Race" focuses on ferocious new vampire hunter Travis Kidd - but what is his connection to Skinner Sweet? As the story comes to a violent end, a sworn enemy's identity is finally revealed, and lots of blood is spilled! Writer Scott Snyder (Batman, Swamp Thing) and artist Rafael Albuquerque bring together even more threads to the complex tapestry that is the world of American Vampire. Collecting: American Vampire 19-27


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American Vampire flashes back to two very distinct points in American history. The first tale comes from the early 1800's with the "The Beast in the Cave" featuring art by the legendary Jordi Bernet (Torpedo, Jonah Hex). Learn about the original American Vampire, Skinner Sweet, and his involvement in the brutal Indian Wars, and an ancient evil hidden in the heart of the Ol American Vampire flashes back to two very distinct points in American history. The first tale comes from the early 1800's with the "The Beast in the Cave" featuring art by the legendary Jordi Bernet (Torpedo, Jonah Hex). Learn about the original American Vampire, Skinner Sweet, and his involvement in the brutal Indian Wars, and an ancient evil hidden in the heart of the Old West. Plus, more about the man Skinner used to call his best friend - James Book! The second tale comes straight from 1950s America, where American Vampire is terrorizing the suburbs with hot rods, teenyboppers and fangs! "Death Race" focuses on ferocious new vampire hunter Travis Kidd - but what is his connection to Skinner Sweet? As the story comes to a violent end, a sworn enemy's identity is finally revealed, and lots of blood is spilled! Writer Scott Snyder (Batman, Swamp Thing) and artist Rafael Albuquerque bring together even more threads to the complex tapestry that is the world of American Vampire. Collecting: American Vampire 19-27

30 review for American Vampire, Vol. 4

  1. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    So, you have 3 stories in this one. A 50's teenage vampire hunter goes up against a group of vampires and (eventually) Skinner Sweet, all while trying to deal with his conscience & a cute girl who happens to be a vampire servant. Spoilery things happen. Then you get a look at Skinner and Brook during the Indian Wars. Turns out they knew each other pretty well and you kind of look on the early stories about them in a whole new way after this. There was also a short story about racism that starred the So, you have 3 stories in this one. A 50's teenage vampire hunter goes up against a group of vampires and (eventually) Skinner Sweet, all while trying to deal with his conscience & a cute girl who happens to be a vampire servant. Spoilery things happen. Then you get a look at Skinner and Brook during the Indian Wars. Turns out they knew each other pretty well and you kind of look on the early stories about them in a whole new way after this. There was also a short story about racism that starred the dude who got turned at the end of the last comic. All in all another interesting volume of American Vampire. The only reason I'm slightly on the fence about continuing with this series is that people have mentioned the series sort of drops off the face of the earth after a cliffhanger. Thoughts? Anyone?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    In order to fight the US soldiers encroaching on their territory, including Jim Book and Skinner Sweet, the Apaches awaken a legendary monster, the Mimteh. Greaser vampire hunter Travis Kidd is on the trail of a vampire that killed his family. Agent Poole is in the south and encounters both racism and another breed of vampire. All this and more in American Vampire Volume 4! Here we are again, another entry in Scott Snyder's chronicles of vampires in America. At this point in the series, it's gett In order to fight the US soldiers encroaching on their territory, including Jim Book and Skinner Sweet, the Apaches awaken a legendary monster, the Mimteh. Greaser vampire hunter Travis Kidd is on the trail of a vampire that killed his family. Agent Poole is in the south and encounters both racism and another breed of vampire. All this and more in American Vampire Volume 4! Here we are again, another entry in Scott Snyder's chronicles of vampires in America. At this point in the series, it's getting repetitive to say but Scott Snyder is my favorite active comic writer. The three stories within this volume take place in different time periods but all serve the same purpose: to showcase the different species of vampires in America and expand the backstory of Skinner Sweet and the rest of the supporting cast. I liked the pre-vampiric history of Skinner Sweet and Jim Book, and the Mimteh. She reminded me of the character Julie Newmar played in the Gregory Peck western, Mackenna's Gold, only with fangs. I'm hoping she makes further appearances in the series. Travis Kidd, greaser vampire hunter, was another interesting addition to Snyder's vampire mythos. I love the idea of a kid being busted out of a nuthouse to be a vampire hunter, and he's one of the best. The wooden fangs he uses to bite vampires back was a nice touch, and he made a good point about Skinner Sweet near the end of his tale. I have a feeling we haven't seen the last of him. Agent Poole's sojourn into the south met with expected results. The timeline sure jumped ahead quite a bit in this volume, all the way until the 1960's. How far is Snyder planning on taking us in the life of Skinner Sweet? (view spoiler)[While Pearl and Henry made the tiniest of appearances, it was the most powerful scene in the book and planted even more seeds for the next volume. (hide spoiler)] If I had to complain about something in this volume, it would be that we didn't get all that much Skinner Sweet as a vampire. Still, Snyder continues to keep me entertained with one of the most overused monsters, the vampire. Now I have to wait a few months until the next volume comes out.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kemper

    While some people waste their time writing Twilight fan-fiction and then convert it into best selling mommy porn, I prefer to concentrate on my own brand of fan-fic in which American vampire Skinner Sweet messily murders every character that Stephenie Meyer ever created. I’m hoping to get that book deal any day now. There are several different stories contained in this collection. A flashback to Skinner’s pre-vampire days as a cavalry officer fighting Indians shows that he may once have been huma While some people waste their time writing Twilight fan-fiction and then convert it into best selling mommy porn, I prefer to concentrate on my own brand of fan-fic in which American vampire Skinner Sweet messily murders every character that Stephenie Meyer ever created. I’m hoping to get that book deal any day now. There are several different stories contained in this collection. A flashback to Skinner’s pre-vampire days as a cavalry officer fighting Indians shows that he may once have been human, but he’s always been an asshole. This one also adds some surprising layers to his relationship to Jim Book. In the 1950s, a young greaser named Travis Kidd is a rogue vampire hunter and mixes it up some suburban bloodsuckers while refusing to work for the Vassals of the Morning Star. Calvin Poole is a black man traveling through the segregated south as the civil rights movement is heating up which is dangerous enough but being a vampire helps him deal with a pack of murderous racists. This is a series that is getting more intriguing the deeper I get into it. There’s several shocking revelations in this one that build on what we've seen before while Scott Snyder patiently creates a mythology that is based on different vampire species at war with each other and humans through American history. I can’t wait to see what kind of blood soaked horror he comes up with for those damn dirty hippies in the '60s.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    3 1/2 stars. I've been very vocal about my love for Scott Snyder and want to be clear that love remains unabated. Snyder's American Vampire series has returned vampires to their horror roots and is one of the best comics out there; Snyder's writing is smart and strictly adults only. In this volume, we have three distinct periods in American history and, as usual, we have three distinct American vampires. The vampires in Snyder's world are not stagnant; they continue to change and evolve, creating 3 1/2 stars. I've been very vocal about my love for Scott Snyder and want to be clear that love remains unabated. Snyder's American Vampire series has returned vampires to their horror roots and is one of the best comics out there; Snyder's writing is smart and strictly adults only. In this volume, we have three distinct periods in American history and, as usual, we have three distinct American vampires. The vampires in Snyder's world are not stagnant; they continue to change and evolve, creating intriguing subspecies that have strengths and weaknesses unlike those who came before or will come after them. This certainly makes life tough on the average vampire hunter, who must memorize the various vampiric types and their particular Achilles's heel. In the first story, we have Skinner Sweet and Jim Book as best friends and Indian fighters in 1871. We learn that Skinner and Jim grew up as brothers when Jim's family took in the impetuous, orphaned Skinner. Knowing there is nothing they can do to stem the influx of white settlers, one Indian chief, Hole in the Sky, plans to wake a powerful goddess of death, Mimiteh, in the hope that she will ally herself with the Native Americans and give them the advantage. Naturally, things do not go according to plan and we learn that Skinner was not the first American Vampire. The second story is my favorite and is set in the 1950's. Travis Kidd is a reckless youth who seems modeled after Marlon Brando's character in The Wild One: nothing but leather jacket, attitude, and a taste for speed. Travis, however, is definitely a rebel with a cause--hunting for the vampire that killed his family (the panel showing a young Travis hiding in a cupboard during the violence is particularly heart-wrenching), he's the best self-taught vampire slayer out there. And it's not long before the Vassals of the Morning Star start trying to recruit him. The final story is set in 1950's Alabama and follows our first African-American vampire, Calvin Poole, into the heart of a segregated South. It turns out that racism is the least of Calvin's problems when he encounters a new breed of vampire that gives a unique twist on the intersection of werewolf and vampire mythology. Pearl and Henry from the previous volumes also make an unexpected appearance. All of these stories are engrossing and continue the complex character building from the first two volumes. So why only 3 1/2 star? The first story, The Beast in the Cave, features art by Jordi Bernet, and his colorful, cartoonish style put me in mind of something akin to the old Li'l Abner comic strip. It's hard to take a death goddess seriously when she struts around with gravity defying T & A and nipples that look like index fingers. Bernet's art fails to set the right tone for the story. It certainly would have been better served by Albuquerque's uniquely dark, violent and often primitive style. Unfortunately, a story that should be anything but laughable comes dangerously close to being so. Cross posted at This Insignificant Cinder

  5. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    This is probably the best volume so far. The first story is mostly about Skinner before he became a vamp. Him and a group of men are trying to attack a troop of indians. Of course the indians go to summon something they can't control, a vampire with massive power, but mostly this is the story of Skinner being a complete piece of shit even before he became a vampire. Then the next story is all about Kidd. Who's that? He's a badass elvis looking dude who kills vampires for a living. It's really hi This is probably the best volume so far. The first story is mostly about Skinner before he became a vamp. Him and a group of men are trying to attack a troop of indians. Of course the indians go to summon something they can't control, a vampire with massive power, but mostly this is the story of Skinner being a complete piece of shit even before he became a vampire. Then the next story is all about Kidd. Who's that? He's a badass elvis looking dude who kills vampires for a living. It's really high end fun. The last story is a two parter of another person we know from the last book. Don't wait to spoil it but we seeing the last American Vampire and what they are up to. Overall, fun. That's the word this volume would be. Skinner is a piece of shit and he's on full display here. We also get Kidd, who I hope returns, because he's the best character next to Pearl for me. I loved how the plot moved forward to despite these being so different from each other. The last story is the weakest part, while still good, isn't as interesting as the first two. This is a nice 4.5 out of 5. Just a ton of fun. I can't wait to read more.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Char

    There were three stories in this volume and I enjoyed them all! Pre-vampire Skinner Sweet and his childhood friend Jim Book, , 50's greaser vampire-hunter Travis Kidd and his badass hot rod, and lastly Calvin Poole living life as a black vampire in the 60's. We were all over the place, time-wise, in this one, but that was cool because the times were interesting. Also, Skinner Sweet wasn't in this one all that much, which I thought was a good thing. I do wish we got to see more of Pearl and Henry, There were three stories in this volume and I enjoyed them all! Pre-vampire Skinner Sweet and his childhood friend Jim Book, , 50's greaser vampire-hunter Travis Kidd and his badass hot rod, and lastly Calvin Poole living life as a black vampire in the 60's. We were all over the place, time-wise, in this one, but that was cool because the times were interesting. Also, Skinner Sweet wasn't in this one all that much, which I thought was a good thing. I do wish we got to see more of Pearl and Henry, but what we did see has me stoked for the next volume, which luckily is sitting there waiting for me on my reading table at home. Onward! These may not be the best graphic novels ever, but I sure am enjoying the hell out of them just the same.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Otherwyrld

    Three different stories set in different eras. The first shows the childhoods of Skinner Sweet and James Book as they grew up together, then follows them into the Indian Wars and (nearly) an encounter with a very familiar monster. It turns out that Sweet is not the first American Vampire after all! The story shows just how early Sweet's psychopathic nature manifested itself, and how deep the connection with Book actually ran. The second story is set in the 1950s and introduces us to a new charac Three different stories set in different eras. The first shows the childhoods of Skinner Sweet and James Book as they grew up together, then follows them into the Indian Wars and (nearly) an encounter with a very familiar monster. It turns out that Sweet is not the first American Vampire after all! The story shows just how early Sweet's psychopathic nature manifested itself, and how deep the connection with Book actually ran. The second story is set in the 1950s and introduces us to a new character called Travis Kidd. He is a self-taught vampire hunter who is set for revenge against the vampires who killed his parents when he was a child. Here, he encounters none only than Skinner Sweet, and pair engage in a fight to see is the most bad-ass of the two. Travis is an interesting character, seemingly the epitome of the rebellious American teenager, and we are certain to be seeing him again as he is now on the radar of the Vassals of the Morning Star. It also seems that the Vassals now have Sweet under some kind of control, which doesn't make him any less dangerous. The final story follows our latest American Vampire Calvin Poole, as he investigates a possible new breed of vampire and encounters racism in 1950s deep south America. Calvin is another good addition to the growing cast of characters. Finally, he have an all too brief (and devastating) glimpse of what has happened to Henry and Pearl. Good stories, good artwork (with one caveat - Agent Hobbes never seems to look any older despite showing up for 30 years. Maybe he's a vampire too, or is it just the limitations of the artwork?) 4 stars

  8. 5 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    This series gets even better! What’s it about? There’s multiple stories in this volume, all building the fantastic story this series is trying to tell. Why it gets 5 stars: The stories (there’s a few) are all very interesting! We learn a bit more about Skinner Sweet, we get introduced to a bad-a** vampire slayer in a different story and get introduced to a new bad-a** vampire in a story that approaches the topic of racism well (something I wish more authors were able to do). Also, there’s a lot more This series gets even better! What’s it about? There’s multiple stories in this volume, all building the fantastic story this series is trying to tell. Why it gets 5 stars: The stories (there’s a few) are all very interesting! We learn a bit more about Skinner Sweet, we get introduced to a bad-a** vampire slayer in a different story and get introduced to a new bad-a** vampire in a story that approaches the topic of racism well (something I wish more authors were able to do). Also, there’s a lot more added to the main story! The characters are very interesting. Some familiar faces and some interesting new characters! The art is bad-a** as usual. Holy s***, there’s a lot of action in this volume and it’s freakin’ awesome! Very well done action throughout! This volume is unpredictable, some really unexpected stuff! The horror stuff is really well done as always! Such a great cliffhanger ending! Oh my gosh! Overall: Another amazing volume of this amazing series! Can’t recommend this book enough! 5/5

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lena

    Well, that was an abrupt end to Henry. Other storylines include: JLo Native American Vampire with a monstrous appetite for men. Skinner Sweet and Jim Book when they were besties. Calvin Poole, who became the first African American Vampire by accident in Taipei, finding unexpected friends and unexpected werewolves. Travis Kidd, randomly added teen greaser/vampire hunter. This plot line felt as solid as air. And, as always, another dangling thread of Skinner Sweet. Brace yourselves, (view spoiler)[Sweet Well, that was an abrupt end to Henry. Other storylines include: JLo Native American Vampire with a monstrous appetite for men. Skinner Sweet and Jim Book when they were besties. Calvin Poole, who became the first African American Vampire by accident in Taipei, finding unexpected friends and unexpected werewolves. Travis Kidd, randomly added teen greaser/vampire hunter. This plot line felt as solid as air. And, as always, another dangling thread of Skinner Sweet. Brace yourselves, (view spoiler)[Sweet now works for the Vassals. WTF? (hide spoiler)] Apparently not. What I really wanted was to revisit Felicia and Gus. Just scrapping three stars here.

  10. 4 out of 5

    C. Varn

    Snyder moves out back into time to origins of American Vampire as well as forward into the early 1950s: we are given Skinner Sweet's backstory and remains as obnoxious and cliche an anti-hero as there has ever been. The Books interplay with Sweet became apparent as learn more about Jim Book, and the backstory of curse and Mimteh is fascinating. Travis Kidd, the vampire hunter and greaser, is an interesting diversion and given a complete one-off tragedy plotline involving two young vampires in lo Snyder moves out back into time to origins of American Vampire as well as forward into the early 1950s: we are given Skinner Sweet's backstory and remains as obnoxious and cliche an anti-hero as there has ever been. The Books interplay with Sweet became apparent as learn more about Jim Book, and the backstory of curse and Mimteh is fascinating. Travis Kidd, the vampire hunter and greaser, is an interesting diversion and given a complete one-off tragedy plotline involving two young vampires in love. Yet, aside from the Mimteh plotline which was truly somewhat original, this is serving up trope after trope, and the characters that I like (Pearl and Felecia) are under-utilized in this volume.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ronyell

    5.5 stars! Brief Introduction: Wow! I had never seen a comic book series get better and better over time since Neil Gaiman’s “Sandman” series and Joss Whedon’s run on “Astonishing X-Men!” Scott Snyder continues to amaze me with his stellar storytelling in the “American Vampire” series and the fourth volume is definitely one of the best volumes I had read so far in this series! With brilliant writing from Scott Snyder along with fantastic artwork from Rafael Albuquerque, Jordi Bernet, Roger 5.5 stars! Brief Introduction: Wow! I had never seen a comic book series get better and better over time since Neil Gaiman’s “Sandman” series and Joss Whedon’s run on “Astonishing X-Men!” Scott Snyder continues to amaze me with his stellar storytelling in the “American Vampire” series and the fourth volume is definitely one of the best volumes I had read so far in this series! With brilliant writing from Scott Snyder along with fantastic artwork from Rafael Albuquerque, Jordi Bernet, Roger Cruz and Riccardo Burchielli, “American Vampire: Volume Four” is definitely one volume that will not disappoint you! What is the story? In this volume, there are a total of three stories that each details all the characters’ progression into the 1950s: The Beast in the Cave: This story is about how Skinner Sweet and Jim Book were once as close as brothers, but when the Indian Wars broke out and a new threat is unleashed, Jim and Skinner’s relationship with each other might never be the same again. Death Race: Meet Travis Kidd, a nineteen year old teenage boy who not only sports a Greaser look and lives in the 1950s, but he also happens to be one of the best vampire hunters ever around and he has a vengeance with one vampire in particular. The Nocturnes: Meet Calvin Poole, an African-American man who has a tough life in the 1950s as blacks were frowned upon in society and he is constantly harassed by the citizens because of the color of his skin. However, what the citizens do not know about Calvin is that he is apart of a secret organization that hunts vampires, while also harboring a dark secret about himself. What I loved about this comic: Scott Snyder’s writing: Man, Scott Snyder just continues to amaze me with his stellar writing! Scott Snyder has cleverly weaved a fictional tale with historical elements that affects the characters’ situations. I really enjoyed the fact that we are learning more about Skinner Sweet’s past as he was involved in the Indian Wars and his relationship with Jim Book, which we learned about in the previous volumes. Scott Snyder has done a fantastic job at providing a broad back story about Skinner Sweet and as I start learning more about Skinner Sweet’s back story, I start to understand more about where his vicious nature was coming from and how he affected history in many different ways. Probably my most favorite story in this entire volume was the one regarding Travis Kidd, as his story was the highlight of this volume (his picture is even on the front of the cover)! I loved the way that Scott Snyder developed Travis Kidd’s character as he is not shown as a stereotypical “greaser” boy, but hearing his tragic back story regarding his parents really made me feel so much sympathy for his character and I also loved the fact that Travis Kidd is able to take down any vampire he comes across! I also enjoyed the way that Scott Snyder told Calvin Poole’s story and I felt sympathy for him as he had to suffer through racism in the 1950s and I also loved his dark past storyline as it really made him stand out as a character. I still enjoy the way that Scott Snyder weaves fictional characters into historical elements like the Indian Wars and the racism and prejudice that dominated society around the 1950s and is still able to focus on the characters trying to fight off vampires without using real life historical figures in the story. Rafael Albuquerque, Jordi Bernet, Roger Cruz and Riccardo Burchielli’s artwork: The artwork in this volume was amazing as each artist contributed greatly to the stories in this volume. Jordi Bernet’s artwork in “The Beast in the Cave” was quite different then from what I usually see from the “American Vampire” series as the artwork is shown in much brighter colors and the characters look a bit generic. I loved the way that Jordi Bernet gave shadowing to the character’s faces which brought out a dramatic effect to them. Rafael Albuquerque once again brings true creativity to the “American Vampire” series by doing the artwork in “Death Race” and I loved the dark and gritty feel of the artwork as it greatly complements with the horror story. Roger Cruz and Riccardo Burchielli’s artwork in “The Nocturnes” were truly well done as Roger Cruz’s artwork makes the characters look truly realistic while Riccardo Burchielli’s artwork is a bit more simplistic, but still has enough dramatic effect to the story. What made me feel uncomfortable about this book: For anyone that does not like strong violence, this volume has many gory scenes of characters being bitten by vampires and blood squirting everywhere, so it might be hard to get through those scenes. Also, this volume has strong language which includes the “s” word and the “f” word, so readers who are offended by coarse language might want to skim over those words. Final Thoughts: Overall, “American Vampire: Volume Four” is just full of shocking surprises that really has me geared up for the fifth volume and now that this volume introduces new characters Travis Kidd and Calvin Poole, I cannot wait to see where their stories are going to go in the next volume! Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

  12. 5 out of 5

    Václav

    AMVAMP is here with the fourth book, again going ahead in time, but this time also going back and way back. There is a new character, which we must follow for while until we get his origin (and this is classic storytelling thing), and also we get back to the origins of Skinner Sweet's person and we get to know an old-new character, whose origin we witnessed first hand in the previous book. We realize there is a vast network of different vampires. Well, not really network, more like single enclav AMVAMP is here with the fourth book, again going ahead in time, but this time also going back and way back. There is a new character, which we must follow for while until we get his origin (and this is classic storytelling thing), and also we get back to the origins of Skinner Sweet's person and we get to know an old-new character, whose origin we witnessed first hand in the previous book. We realize there is a vast network of different vampires. Well, not really network, more like single enclaves connected like a tree, but all the connections are old and forgotten. So there is always a chance to vampires be surprised by other vampires and this paradigma - struggle not only between humans and vampires but also amongst them (besides the American vampire versus all) is very promising and helps the world keep some variations. I like AMVAMP series, I have some struggle with it that, but I actually enjoy the reading and following the stories of the main protagonists.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Melki

    "Relax, Travis. You just killed two vampires. Let's get a milkshake." I'd say killing two vampires calls for something a little stronger, but, hell . . . a milkshake might taste pretty good after all.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Well, for a vampire who's been shut up in a cave & not allowed to eat for decades, that Mimteh sure has retained her bosom, hasn't she? This is a pretty fair fourth installment of this series, although I found the Mimteh storyline & the lady bubble-bottom contained within to be kind of unintentionally hilarious. Even when I slow down & read carefully, there are still some panel inconsistencies in Albuquereque's artwork that bug me, but maybe that's more Snyder's fault than his? I absolutely love Well, for a vampire who's been shut up in a cave & not allowed to eat for decades, that Mimteh sure has retained her bosom, hasn't she? This is a pretty fair fourth installment of this series, although I found the Mimteh storyline & the lady bubble-bottom contained within to be kind of unintentionally hilarious. Even when I slow down & read carefully, there are still some panel inconsistencies in Albuquereque's artwork that bug me, but maybe that's more Snyder's fault than his? I absolutely love Travis the teenage vampire killer. The artwork that accompanies the story of his formative years, especially the big-eyed baby boy hiding under the cabinet while his parents are being murdered - good grief, but that bit got to me. I'm a pretty big fan of Calvin Poole, too, especially that scene in the hotel pool. I will now just patiently wait on the fifth book since there's not nearly enough Pearl here to keep me satisfied.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    I'm still not sure about the whole "American Vampire" as a different breed of vamp, but as far as the stories go I am really enjoying them. I like how the stories take place in different historial periods. In this volume we have a western tale where a sexy Native American vampire has become a legend and gets involved in the struggle between Native Americans and white soldiers. Then we have a story out of the 50s complete with rumbles and races before we wind up in the 1930s juke joints of Alabama I'm still not sure about the whole "American Vampire" as a different breed of vamp, but as far as the stories go I am really enjoying them. I like how the stories take place in different historial periods. In this volume we have a western tale where a sexy Native American vampire has become a legend and gets involved in the struggle between Native Americans and white soldiers. Then we have a story out of the 50s complete with rumbles and races before we wind up in the 1930s juke joints of Alabama straight out of Robert Johnson's songs, although this time there are vampires and werewolves. Overall a strong volume and while I'm still adjusting to the idea, I have to applaud the creators for trying to do something new with the vampire genre that has been milked to death over the years. It's fresh enough to be interesting, but not so radically different traditional vampire fans would be turned off.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sheida

    What a disappointment.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kurt

    The 1950s saw the rise of the American teenager as a concept, and that's what Scott Snyder hits in this volume of his epic undead romp through the history of the country. Yes, there are two other stories here: a two-issue story of a pre-vampire Skinner Sweet and his adopted brother Jim Book, and a two-issue story to follow up on a new American vampire and introduce werewolves/racism/doo-wop to Snyder's world. These stories are fine, particularly in the way that Snyder does a little hand-waving t The 1950s saw the rise of the American teenager as a concept, and that's what Scott Snyder hits in this volume of his epic undead romp through the history of the country. Yes, there are two other stories here: a two-issue story of a pre-vampire Skinner Sweet and his adopted brother Jim Book, and a two-issue story to follow up on a new American vampire and introduce werewolves/racism/doo-wop to Snyder's world. These stories are fine, particularly in the way that Snyder does a little hand-waving to throw open his toy chest for the werewolves (basically, if he's been developing the idea that culturally disparate vampire traditions are just different species of the same evolving genus, then why can't werewolves - or zombies or any other monster Snyder dreams up in the future - simply be a different species within the genus?), but the focus of the collection is a 1950s car chase story. "Death Race" shifts focus from the vampires to a rebellious teenager hunting the vampire who killed his family (the notes at the back of the book imply that this vampire's identity was supposed to be a surprising reveal, but as much as I enjoy the story, I can't imagine a reader actually being surprised. I'll keep quiet out of respect, though). It's an homage to the road race movies of the era, with each issue covering another couple of minutes of a car chase and the protagonist narrating one of three aspects of life that scientists have discovered that teenage brains can't process (death, love, consequence). It's not a narrative structure that I love on its own, but I'm not a fan of the road race genre, so I can appreciate it as the best possible way to tell this story. Because there are a few things going on here. For one, Snyder is developing some of his human characters to enrich the world he's created - his vampires are growing, and giving them new opponents helps, even if one of those new opponents is a James Dean homage who wears wooden fangs for the thrill of biting vampires (for me, the theoretical logistics of that makes it all a little too silly, but it does a great job as an indication of bravado in the iconic 1950s male teen). For another thing, though, this series has always been about cultural shifts, especially the way that the new is always frightening to the established, and the American teen has been almost as terrifying as the book's titular vampire. For perhaps the first time, young people were openly defying authority (driving cars, having sex, disrespecting their elders, smoking, watching vulgar "chiller" movies) without having to accept adult consequences, and Snyder weaves that distrust into his narrative. His established antagonists, the Vassals of the Morning Star, try to recruit the greaser Travis Kidd, and he's on their side as a human against the undead. But he won't do it their way. He insists on explosions and excitement and an insane car chase, and they can't control him. This works as a feature of the narrative and also as an observation on the cultural shifts of the post-war United States. It's great, and adds depth to an otherwise straightforward high-octane chase story, and I'm really looking forward to where this story goes from here.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Carol Storm

    Well, be-bop-a-lula this book sucks, The vampires look like rabid woodchucks, Be-bop-a-lula I hate to say, Travis is a greaser but he's no Link Wray, Be-bop-a-lula, stop this stupid series now (stop it now, stop it now, stop it now.) (SCREAM!) Oh, I could do another twenty verses Gene Vincent style, but is it worth it? This American Vampire series, it seems they never get tired of breaking my heart. I really enjoyed the first story, "The Thing IN The Cave." The artwork was pretty good for a change Well, be-bop-a-lula this book sucks, The vampires look like rabid woodchucks, Be-bop-a-lula I hate to say, Travis is a greaser but he's no Link Wray, Be-bop-a-lula, stop this stupid series now (stop it now, stop it now, stop it now.) (SCREAM!) Oh, I could do another twenty verses Gene Vincent style, but is it worth it? This American Vampire series, it seems they never get tired of breaking my heart. I really enjoyed the first story, "The Thing IN The Cave." The artwork was pretty good for a change, apparently they brought in a ringer. It was fascinating to see Skinner Sweet and Jim Book as young cavalrymen in the Indian wars. If only the Native Americans weren't such an insulting collection of silly stereotypes! A bimbo goddess with big boobs, a dumb, power-mad chieftain . . . clearly Sherman Alexie didn't write this stuff. Now the "Death Race" series, I really wanted to like it. Nobody loves the Fifties more than I do. A teenage hood who fights vampires and drag races them too? I mean, how can you mess this up? How? Well, all it takes is a really bad artist to crap up a sure-fire premise. You see, when you draw a teenage hood, who says he's a teenager, who in fact never shuts up about "the teenage brain," you don't want him drawn to look like a fifty-something Elvis imitator. This guy Travis, he's supposed to be a tough, sexy young hood. But he's so pale, skinny, and bloodless he looks creepier than the vampires he's supposed to be fighting! On top of that, he has a cute Sandra Dee type girlfriend named Piper, who IS well drawn, at least by the standards of this crap fest. Does Piper get any good lines? Does she show any charm, a sense of humor? Does she have any sex scenes? No, no, no, no. The last story was not so bad, it was a Civil Rights story about Alabama in the Fifties. There were some good surprises about the redneck punks who try to mess with Calvin, the black vampire. The only problem was that the punks all had Kid Rock, Duane Allman type hair, what you might see around 1974. And this story is set in 1954. It was the era of the crew cut. But nobody bothered to do five minutes of research on how young white men wore their hair. And do you know why, Daddy-O? These hep cats just don't give a f**k. See you later alligator!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    Another solid volume of American Vampire. This one has three entirely separate story lines. The first features a pre-vampire Skinner Sweet and is set during the Indian Wars. I think this was the longest storyline, and although there was an interesting story in there, I did feel like it got a touch repetitive. The second story provides the cover image: yes, it's a 50s greaser vampire hunter. Wildly entertaining stuff here, and I could do with seeing more of our vampire hunter. The last is set in Another solid volume of American Vampire. This one has three entirely separate story lines. The first features a pre-vampire Skinner Sweet and is set during the Indian Wars. I think this was the longest storyline, and although there was an interesting story in there, I did feel like it got a touch repetitive. The second story provides the cover image: yes, it's a 50s greaser vampire hunter. Wildly entertaining stuff here, and I could do with seeing more of our vampire hunter. The last is set in the 60s and is a sort of KKK-as-vampires story. A good story, but most notable for the small scene with Henry and Pearl. The single most powerful scene in the entire volume, maybe in the entire run of American Vampire to this point, and it left me more eager to get into the next volume than I think I've ever been.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cyndi

    This story just gets better. Skillfully leads the reader on a feast of mind and sight. And Skinner Sweet is one crazy mf'er! Already anxious for the next volume!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Eli

    Okay, that took me all of an hour and a half. THIS WAS AWESOME. I'm glad they strayed a little from the central plot because these short interrelated stories were really fun.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kayla (onthefritz)

    1863 - Missouri + 1871 - New Mexico Territory An amazing backstory pairing up Sweet and Book 1794 - (Native) American Vampire 1954 - California + Alabama I liked this volume, but not as much as past volumes. Was more of a bunch of side stories overall.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alondra Miller

    4.5 Stars A few new characters; but the same gutsy action... *giggle* Really good, consistent graphic novel series about my favorite undead folk; Vampires. I love the different species and their continuing evolution into something greater. Yikes.

  24. 4 out of 5

    TheVampireBookworm

    American Vampire is still going strong. Skinner Sweet gets a good backstory, Pearl is almost nonexistent in this volume, we get to see more of new monsters from Asia, the indigenous Americans get something, too and the secret agencies seem to be present at everyting. I enjoyed it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nick Craven

    In this issue of American Vampire Scott Snyder takes a step back from all that silly vampire nonsense to take a look at a few important issues such as restoring the lands of the native American peoples, the dangers of teenage rebellion, the rise in vampire home invasions, and of course lycanthropy racism. Volume four of American Vampire takes us to the 50's (an era I was excited about!) but doesn't follow it's normal cast of characters. Volume five features three stories: A Skinner Sweet pre-vamp In this issue of American Vampire Scott Snyder takes a step back from all that silly vampire nonsense to take a look at a few important issues such as restoring the lands of the native American peoples, the dangers of teenage rebellion, the rise in vampire home invasions, and of course lycanthropy racism. Volume four of American Vampire takes us to the 50's (an era I was excited about!) but doesn't follow it's normal cast of characters. Volume five features three stories: A Skinner Sweet pre-vampire origin story, new comer Travis Kidd the teenage vampire slayer and Agent Poole uncovering werewolves in the South. The first story is another Skinner Sweet origin story although this one predates his transformation to a vampire. James Book and Sweet serve in the army together as they make one final push on the indian tribe they're trying to move out. The push the Indian leader Hole in the Sky too far and in his desperation he awakens a terrible creature that lives in a cave. This story was okay I guess. Pointless, adding unneeded layers to Skinner's history in which I learned nothing new about why he might be the way he is today. The artwork was almost insulting in this one but It was mildly entertaining and not very long. The second story was one of the most bad ass plot lines Snyder has kicked out to date. We're introduced to a newcomer to the American Vampire series, Travis Kidd. Kidd is a greaser and a self proclaimed rebel, also the best solo vampire hunter out there. Travis is a really creative vampire killer, using a set of wooden teeth to bite the vampires back during their fights was just so cool, you can really feel his hate for the dirty blood suckers. The car chase scene was so much fun as well as the final confrontation with the vampire that killed his family. He's sure as hell come a lot closer to killing it than anyone else who's gone up against this monster! I can only hope there's more Travis to come. Someone needs to fill the spot that Cash left. The final story was about Agent Poole traveling to the South in search of "something new" whether that is vampires or racial tolerance I'm not totally sure. This story was fun, and it added a lot to the vampire mythology by including the werewolves in the mix. Snyder has a lot of big ideas for cool monsters that got turned into tools who are obsessed with the least interesting girl in the world. Anyway, I'm not sure how I feel about Poole yet. I only vaguely remember him from volume three. He seems cool but doesn't seem to have much personality to carry his own story for more than 25 pages but it this volume it was enough. Maybe he'll grow on me in the future! Pearl and Henry make a very very short appearance although it might be the most important 2 pages in the book. I can't spoil anything but It's certainly going to be a very important topic in the next volume! I liked volume four a lot but I thought the first story was pretty damn weak and the last was decent. It's the Travis Kidd plot line that made this issue excel! The lack of Pearl and Henry was pretty disappointing especially because there was no Cash, or Book either. Kidd picked up the slack pretty well though so it's hard to complain! This series continues to impress and entertain! Snyder keeps American Vampire at the top of my graphic novels to read list. A solid 4 out of 5!!!

  26. 5 out of 5

    colleen the convivial curmudgeon

    The volume has three stories in it: 'The Beast in the Cave', 'Death Race' (from which the cover picture comes), and 'The Nocturnes'. *** possible minor spoilers*** 'Beast in the Cave' was by far the worst. For one, I felt the new backstory of Skinner and Book felt kind of ret-conny, and I'm not sure it really added anything to their relationship - though I suppose more might come from it. Speaking of ret-con, the whole thing about Mimiteh being this other breed of American Vampire, long before the The volume has three stories in it: 'The Beast in the Cave', 'Death Race' (from which the cover picture comes), and 'The Nocturnes'. *** possible minor spoilers*** 'Beast in the Cave' was by far the worst. For one, I felt the new backstory of Skinner and Book felt kind of ret-conny, and I'm not sure it really added anything to their relationship - though I suppose more might come from it. Speaking of ret-con, the whole thing about Mimiteh being this other breed of American Vampire, long before the turning of Skinner, sort of belies the whole "omg, new kind of vampire!" thing - though I suppose you could explain that with her holing up in a cave most of the time. Which brings us to the real downside of the story - this chick hides out in a cave, without feeding, for years and years, without feeding - but when dudemar goes into the cave she's all pert and nubile and, of course, naked. Yeah - the whole point of this story is for hot naked chick. Boo. Luckily it's not that long of a story... 'Death Race', conversely, was the best of the lot. It introduces us to vampire hunter Travis, a greaser type, hunting the vampire responsible for the deaths of his family. This was a really good story and I liked Travis a lot, and hope to see him more in future installments. With the way the story ended, with Travis finding out who was responsible but not being able to get his revenge - and with the Vassals trying to recruit him - I'm sure this won't be the last we see of him. 'The Nocturnes' was an ok story, where we see more of Calvin Poole from the Pacific Theater. We get a little backstory for him, and, through him, experience some of the racial tension of the 50s. This story mostly serves to set up future installments, with a brief but pivotal glimpse of Pearl and Henry.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Adam M

    This volume is has two pretty wildly different parts, both are great. This opens with Skinner Sweet and James Book's involvement in the Indian Wars of the early 1800's. It feels like a Jonah Hex story and artist Jordi Bernet of Jonah Hex fame did the art for this story arc. It's pitch-perfect for the story. Fast forward to the 2nd half of this book and we're in the 1950's with a greaser named Travis Kidd who lives fast and dangerously. It could feel a little over the top, but with this title it' This volume is has two pretty wildly different parts, both are great. This opens with Skinner Sweet and James Book's involvement in the Indian Wars of the early 1800's. It feels like a Jonah Hex story and artist Jordi Bernet of Jonah Hex fame did the art for this story arc. It's pitch-perfect for the story. Fast forward to the 2nd half of this book and we're in the 1950's with a greaser named Travis Kidd who lives fast and dangerously. It could feel a little over the top, but with this title it's tough for things not to feel over the top from the get-go. Finally, we get a story line catching up with Calvin Hobbes (and here I was worried it would be a while till we heard from him) and how he's handling himself. It's a interesting story if for no other reason than it continues to expand on what we know about the Vassals and their library of abominations. The ending of this volume too... well...

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    4.5 stars!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sean Carlin

    Scott Snyder continues his nonlinear tour through American history in this collection of three story arcs from the ongoing American Vampire series: "The Beast in the Cave," "Death Race," and "The Nocturnes." "The Beast in the Cave": Well, you can't be a series about the horrors of American history without addressing the Indian Wars, and it turns out Skinner Sweet was involved in those, too; this installment sheds yet more light on his storied past. Also: (view spoiler)[It's possible Skinner wasn' Scott Snyder continues his nonlinear tour through American history in this collection of three story arcs from the ongoing American Vampire series: "The Beast in the Cave," "Death Race," and "The Nocturnes." "The Beast in the Cave": Well, you can't be a series about the horrors of American history without addressing the Indian Wars, and it turns out Skinner Sweet was involved in those, too; this installment sheds yet more light on his storied past. Also: (view spoiler)[It's possible Skinner wasn't, in fact, the first American vampire, after all... (hide spoiler)] It's American Vampire meets American Graffiti in "Death Race," which introduces a new breed of vampire slayer: greaser Travis Kidd. After the pair of World War II–era story arcs from the previous volume, "Ghost War" and "Survival of the Fittest," it was nice to take a step back from the geopolitical intrigue and indulge a little "nostalgic" Americana once again. Though, it must be noted, (view spoiler)[the Surprise! Skinner's still alive! routine is getting a little predictable... (hide spoiler)] Finally, the two-part "The Nocturnes" takes us to the Jim Crow South of the 1950s, which, like virtually every plotline in this series, both ties into the ongoing mythology and manages to expand it in the process. This arc reminded me in some ways of Matt Ruff's Lovecraft Country (which I reviewed here). Snyder's got a winning concept here, and continues to use his immortal ensemble to explore some of the darkest chapters of American history.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gabriela Pop

    2.5/5 My least favourite volume of the series so far,sadly.I thought it was a little bit all over the place and I didn't find an easy to follow main narrative thread connecting all the issues to one another.I also thought the artwork for the first few issues was a little bit off.Alas,I look forward to reading the next installment and hope it shall be more to my liking.

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