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All In The Family: The Realignment Of American Democracy Since The 1960s, by Self, Robert O.


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All In The Family: The Realignment Of American Democracy Since The 1960s, by Self, Robert O.

30 review for All in the Family: The Realignment of American Democracy Since the 1960s

  1. 5 out of 5

    Socraticgadfly

    Solid overview of political, social and cultural realignment on some hot-button social issues from the Great Society to today, namely gay rights, feminism, and abortion. It's really a 3.5 star ... given so few other reviews, I almost rated it 4, not 3. But, if necessary, I'll come back and change it. Issues? 1. There's little new, especially if your politics is to the left of today's neoliberal Democrats and you read outside the normal boxes. 2. It's a bit dry at times. 3. For all of Self's asides ab Solid overview of political, social and cultural realignment on some hot-button social issues from the Great Society to today, namely gay rights, feminism, and abortion. It's really a 3.5 star ... given so few other reviews, I almost rated it 4, not 3. But, if necessary, I'll come back and change it. Issues? 1. There's little new, especially if your politics is to the left of today's neoliberal Democrats and you read outside the normal boxes. 2. It's a bit dry at times. 3. For all of Self's asides about white feminists and white gays/lesbians relating to their minority cohorts, in hindsight, it doesn't seem like he got that deep into that issue, except tangentially. That's not to mention not getting further into black civil rights' leaders often thorny-at-best connection with gay rights.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Peter (Pete) Mcloughlin

    This book is largely about the realignment of American politics since about 1964 until the early eighties. It starts off with Johnsons civil rights acts and the war on poverty as the culmination of the New Deals assumptions of "Male Breadwinner Liberalism". Manhood was an unchallenged assumption and the nuclear family was the ideal (if not a reality for most families). The assumption that the state should support male breadwinners was taken as a granted in plans of building the welfare state in This book is largely about the realignment of American politics since about 1964 until the early eighties. It starts off with Johnsons civil rights acts and the war on poverty as the culmination of the New Deals assumptions of "Male Breadwinner Liberalism". Manhood was an unchallenged assumption and the nuclear family was the ideal (if not a reality for most families). The assumption that the state should support male breadwinners was taken as a granted in plans of building the welfare state in the middle part of the twentieth century. This assumption was challenged by developments in the mid 1960s and early seventies. The second wave feminist movement brought to light the male breadwinner ideal and the domestic wife and questioned the validity of that assumption. Another challenge came from the carnage of the Vietnam war calling into question the virtue of military ideals as a part of manhood. A growing gay rights movement challenged traditional ideas of manhood on another front. As a result liberalism shifted because of these changes in the assumptions about family. It took a more equitable approach to issues of gender. This alienated many ordinary Americans and as the story goes on conservatives capitalized on middle america's fear and frustration with the feminist movement and what appeared in their eyes as an assault on the traditional family and refocused politics on family values. This contends the author is the begining of the culture warswhich is responsible for the destruction of the New Deal Coalition and reign of neoliberalism. While I agree with the author that a large part of the culture wars is in part a backlash against second wave feminism and the gay rights movement and explains the Rpublican base's "God, Guns and Gays" rhetoric. There is alot more to this shift. The author spends very little time on the shitty economy of the seventies or the rust belt and diminishing power of unions or the resurgence of militant anticommunism in the late seventies as factors. These are a major part of the story that the author neglects. Still I like the book because the author explains one major strand in the death of liberalism in the seventies. A good read and I highly recommend it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tim Brown

    Pretty balanced account of social changes in the U.S. from the 1960s through the 1980s.The theme of family and its redefinition during these years (which coincided with my childhood and youth) is novel and persuasive.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Looks fascinating but i probably will never get through all 528 pages.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Andee Nero

    I told myself that I wouldn't get as angry reading this book as I did the first time, but nope. *totally pissed* Fuck straight white dudes.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Howarth

    Excellent analysis of the US political climate that explains the widespread support for the GOP agenda. As liberals moved to include the protected classes the conservatives became disenfranchised. Instead of closing the gap each party does its best to widen the gap. By understanding the duality hopefully we can move past the divide to return to a United States.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chris Cook

    This book was a bit long to get through, and it was breadth than depth about the subject matter--how breadwinner liberalism became breadwinner conservatism, and led to the development of the New Right in American politics--but I appreciated how he layered so many events in the narrative so that we could see the themes and motives he mentioned as they developed through the 1960s-1980s. To think that 30% of the nation has been able to use their influence to create a right-oriented conservative gov This book was a bit long to get through, and it was breadth than depth about the subject matter--how breadwinner liberalism became breadwinner conservatism, and led to the development of the New Right in American politics--but I appreciated how he layered so many events in the narrative so that we could see the themes and motives he mentioned as they developed through the 1960s-1980s. To think that 30% of the nation has been able to use their influence to create a right-oriented conservative government in a country that is 70% liberal-leaning...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kendall Berdinsky

    long but worth every word.

  9. 4 out of 5

    John Kaufmann

    Excellent premise, with good supporting evidence. Self argues that the realignment of American politics from liberal to conservative over the past four decades was driven by challenges to gender and sexual roles and which vision predominated. The book explores the various male and female roles, how traditional roles came under assault during the 1960s, and the conservative counter-reaction. These roles, Self argues, are one of society's guiding mythologies, and shape how society is ordered. Rath Excellent premise, with good supporting evidence. Self argues that the realignment of American politics from liberal to conservative over the past four decades was driven by challenges to gender and sexual roles and which vision predominated. The book explores the various male and female roles, how traditional roles came under assault during the 1960s, and the conservative counter-reaction. These roles, Self argues, are one of society's guiding mythologies, and shape how society is ordered. Rather than being a sideshow, how the culture-war battles play out shape our broader politic landscape. (view spoiler)[Before the 1960s the three masculine norms were breadwinning, soldiering, and heterosexuality; women's norms were mothering, domesticity, and heterosexuality. From the New Deal through the Great Society, "breadwinner liberalism" which assisted families was the prevailing mythology. In the 1960s this vision came under challenge, mostly from the left itself. The 1960s, driven by the Civil Rights movement, became more inclusive of different social groups and expanding individual rights. By the late 1960s different versions of feminism and gay rights were on the agenda, challenging gender roles and sexuality. The questionable intent and execution of the Vietnam War challenged the myth that manhood is defined by soldiering. These forces threw the traditional versions of American manhood and womanhood into turmoil. Conservatives, of course, defended the traditional gender roles and sexuality. Their version of "breadwinner's conservatism" proposed to protect the American family and gender roles from moral harm. Liberals, as seen by conservatives, supported big government and promoted abortion, condoned broken families, and advocated equal rights for women and gays (as well as blacks) A return to traditional values required reducing the power of the federal government; families could flourish only if government stayed out of their way. Breadwinners, in this mythology, are not dependent on the state for either welfare or rights. This aligned with conservative market-oriented policies. (hide spoiler)]

  10. 5 out of 5

    John Wetterholt

    An exhaustively researched and generally engagingly written examination of the shifting sociopolitical attitudes in the United States from Kennedy through Clinton. Professor Self is particularly adroit in describing the archetypes that politicians and pundits used in framing their rhetoric. As an outgrowth of the booming post-World War II society, the idea of "breadwinner liberalism" gained a strong foothold, canonizing the dynamic of Dad going to work while Mom stayed home to raise the children An exhaustively researched and generally engagingly written examination of the shifting sociopolitical attitudes in the United States from Kennedy through Clinton. Professor Self is particularly adroit in describing the archetypes that politicians and pundits used in framing their rhetoric. As an outgrowth of the booming post-World War II society, the idea of "breadwinner liberalism" gained a strong foothold, canonizing the dynamic of Dad going to work while Mom stayed home to raise the children. While this scenario was never as pervasive as the "Leave It to Beaver" script writers would have us believe, it became an entrenched aspirational ideal for many citizens and policymakers in the 1960s. The Civil Rights movement of the 1950s and '60s, the push for greater positive rights protections for women and gays in the '60s and '70s, and the shifting economic focus of politicians in and out of power realigned the debate. "Breadwinner liberalism" gave way to a market-driven laissez-faire antithesis, "breadwinner conservatism," which sought the reaffirmation of cherished family archetypes against what were perceived as encroachments by groups (blacks, women, LGBT individuals) seeking positive rights protections. These protections were often characterized by those in resistance to them as pleas for special rights and threats to venerated ideals, when in point of fact these rights protections had historically been enjoyed only by a minority of the population (white heterosexual men). A well-done work of political history.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dave Ciskowski

    A solid and comprehensive review of US political history from 1960 through 2008. The book is an excellent overview and paints a full picture of how politics has evolved (as Self casts it) from breadwinner liberalism to breadwinner conservatism -- and how politics of other identities has both reacted to and shaped this arc. Self chooses comprehensiveness over narrative, and the result is a book that tends to wander between time periods, topics, and frames. This gives it a somewhat zig-zag feel. I A solid and comprehensive review of US political history from 1960 through 2008. The book is an excellent overview and paints a full picture of how politics has evolved (as Self casts it) from breadwinner liberalism to breadwinner conservatism -- and how politics of other identities has both reacted to and shaped this arc. Self chooses comprehensiveness over narrative, and the result is a book that tends to wander between time periods, topics, and frames. This gives it a somewhat zig-zag feel. It's not a 'popular history', and the reader will have work to do to get through it. But it provides a vital understanding of the forces that have shaped and continue to shape US political discourse.

  12. 4 out of 5

    David Bales

    An exhaustively researched and detailed narrative of the years from the mid-1960s to the early 1990s in the American realms of politics, sex, education, labor, gender and religion. The usual suspects: Nixon, feminists, gays, Carter, Reagan, et al make appearances. Good, but kind of academic.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    I thought this book was alright. It was interesting to see the social changes that occurred in America between 1960 and 1980. If you're into American politics and movements, you'll probably enjoy this book a whole lot more than I did. :)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Wow! Comprehensive look at the shift from breadwinner liberalism to breadwinner conservatism starting with the 1960s Great Society and ending with the early 2000s.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Geoffrey Kabaservice

    I reviewed this book for The New Republic in December 2012: http://www.newrepublic.com/book/revie... I reviewed this book for The New Republic in December 2012: http://www.newrepublic.com/book/revie...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Robert

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bill

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jackie Palochko

  19. 4 out of 5

    Angela

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chloe

  22. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

  23. 5 out of 5

    Steve

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Shade

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

  26. 4 out of 5

    Claire

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Richard Anthony

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jed Mortenson

  30. 5 out of 5

    Steven Hartman

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