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Mafiaprinssi on sisäpiiriläisen karu kertomus eräästä Amerikan armottomimpiin lukeutuvasta mafiaperheestä. Tositarina sen verisestä noususta, häikäilemättömistä toimintatavoista ja romahduksesta. Tapahtumien keskiössä on kaksi miestä: Nicodemo Scarfo ja hänen siskonpoikansa Philip Leonetti. "Little Nicky" ja "Crazy Phil". Pomo ja alipomo, kuningas ja vallanperijä. Yli kaks Mafiaprinssi on sisäpiiriläisen karu kertomus eräästä Amerikan armottomimpiin lukeutuvasta mafiaperheestä. Tositarina sen verisestä noususta, häikäilemättömistä toimintatavoista ja romahduksesta. Tapahtumien keskiössä on kaksi miestä: Nicodemo Scarfo ja hänen siskonpoikansa Philip Leonetti. "Little Nicky" ja "Crazy Phil". Pomo ja alipomo, kuningas ja vallanperijä. Yli kaksi tusinaa mafiamurhaa tilillään Scarfo ja Leonetti lukeutuivat 1900-luvun pahamaineisimpien gangstereiden joukkoon aikalaistensa John Gottin, Salvatore "Sammy the Bull" Gravanon ja Vincent "The Chin" Giganten ohella. He olivat koskemattomia. Tai siltä ainakin vaikutti. Mafiaprinssi on heidän tarinansa Philip Leonettin itsensä kertomana. Se on osaksi Kummisetää, osaksi Mafiaveljiä, ja siinä on häivähdys Casinoa, Donnie Brascoa ja Sopranosia. Kyse ei ole kuitenkaan Hollywood-elokuvasta tai televisiosarjasta; tämä on totta.


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Mafiaprinssi on sisäpiiriläisen karu kertomus eräästä Amerikan armottomimpiin lukeutuvasta mafiaperheestä. Tositarina sen verisestä noususta, häikäilemättömistä toimintatavoista ja romahduksesta. Tapahtumien keskiössä on kaksi miestä: Nicodemo Scarfo ja hänen siskonpoikansa Philip Leonetti. "Little Nicky" ja "Crazy Phil". Pomo ja alipomo, kuningas ja vallanperijä. Yli kaks Mafiaprinssi on sisäpiiriläisen karu kertomus eräästä Amerikan armottomimpiin lukeutuvasta mafiaperheestä. Tositarina sen verisestä noususta, häikäilemättömistä toimintatavoista ja romahduksesta. Tapahtumien keskiössä on kaksi miestä: Nicodemo Scarfo ja hänen siskonpoikansa Philip Leonetti. "Little Nicky" ja "Crazy Phil". Pomo ja alipomo, kuningas ja vallanperijä. Yli kaksi tusinaa mafiamurhaa tilillään Scarfo ja Leonetti lukeutuivat 1900-luvun pahamaineisimpien gangstereiden joukkoon aikalaistensa John Gottin, Salvatore "Sammy the Bull" Gravanon ja Vincent "The Chin" Giganten ohella. He olivat koskemattomia. Tai siltä ainakin vaikutti. Mafiaprinssi on heidän tarinansa Philip Leonettin itsensä kertomana. Se on osaksi Kummisetää, osaksi Mafiaveljiä, ja siinä on häivähdys Casinoa, Donnie Brascoa ja Sopranosia. Kyse ei ole kuitenkaan Hollywood-elokuvasta tai televisiosarjasta; tämä on totta.

30 review for Mafia Prince: Inside America's Most Violent Crime Family and the Bloody Fall of La Cosa Nostra

  1. 5 out of 5

    dan_rtype

    I've read A LOT of books on the mafia and this one is my favorite. Unlike most true crime books, Phil Leonetti actually lived "the life" at the highest levels as the underboss of the Philadelphia mob during his uncle Little Nicky Scarfo's reign as boss. Unlike Sammy Gravano's "Underboss," I didn't find Leonetti's autobiography to be filled with self-serving braggadocio. Leonetti comes across as likable but cold and calculating. A wolf in sheep's clothing. The authors do a great job of explaining I've read A LOT of books on the mafia and this one is my favorite. Unlike most true crime books, Phil Leonetti actually lived "the life" at the highest levels as the underboss of the Philadelphia mob during his uncle Little Nicky Scarfo's reign as boss. Unlike Sammy Gravano's "Underboss," I didn't find Leonetti's autobiography to be filled with self-serving braggadocio. Leonetti comes across as likable but cold and calculating. A wolf in sheep's clothing. The authors do a great job of explaining Leonetti's world and why he did the things he did. The book is full of the byzantine betrayals, double and triple crosses that is life in La Cosa Nostra. It's also one of the only books to cover the Genovese Crime Family and its boss Vincent "The Chin" Gigante in any great detail which is invaluable.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    Wow. To flip on the mob you were a part of. Put many of them in jail. Write a book about it. Still stay alive. Pretty incredible accounts of life inside the mob with actual details of some of the hits and different activities done by not just the mob, but the man providing the info for book himself.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michael Flanagan

    Mafia Prince takes the reader into the secret world of La Cosa Nostra through one time mobster and FBI informant Phil "Crazy Phil" Leonetti. Phil does not hold back when describing the world he lived in and quite often you have to remind yourself that this is not fiction. The book is all the top Mafia movies rolled into one, being a cross between the Godfather and Goodfellas with a touch of the Sopranos. What sets this book apart is that we see the transformation and realization of the author tha Mafia Prince takes the reader into the secret world of La Cosa Nostra through one time mobster and FBI informant Phil "Crazy Phil" Leonetti. Phil does not hold back when describing the world he lived in and quite often you have to remind yourself that this is not fiction. The book is all the top Mafia movies rolled into one, being a cross between the Godfather and Goodfellas with a touch of the Sopranos. What sets this book apart is that we see the transformation and realization of the author that there is more to life than the mob. This transformation see's him making a deal with the FBI after he his jailed for 40 years. This see's him becoming a rat and help bring down some of the biggest mobsters of the day. Now don't get me wrong this does not make him a saint. I am sure that under a different set of circumstances Leonetti would still be in the family. While this book delivers a fascinating read it does have a few features that ended up grating on me. This mainly being the constant repeating of phrases and facts, with a bit of editing these could have avoided. Overall though Mafia Prince deliver a very satisfying read and is a must for anyone with an interest in the American Mafia.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Walt

    Adding to the substantive literature on the Scarfo Crime Family, Mafia Prince follows the career of Phil Leonetti, who briefly served as underboss of Nicky Scarfo's organization. The writing is a bit unique. The book is based on interviews with Leonetti, with the authors directly quoting him and then adding (or repeating) the same information. There is not much collaborative evidence. This is Leonetti's story of history. Having read Mafia Wipeout by Tom Cox, Mob Father by Tommy DelGiorno, Breaki Adding to the substantive literature on the Scarfo Crime Family, Mafia Prince follows the career of Phil Leonetti, who briefly served as underboss of Nicky Scarfo's organization. The writing is a bit unique. The book is based on interviews with Leonetti, with the authors directly quoting him and then adding (or repeating) the same information. There is not much collaborative evidence. This is Leonetti's story of history. Having read Mafia Wipeout by Tom Cox, Mob Father by Tommy DelGiorno, Breaking the Mob by Frank Freil, Blood and Honor by George Anastasia, and a few others, I am familiar with Nicky Scarfo's bloody reign. I remember reading DelGiorno's and Caramandi's first-person accounts and thinking, they really did not know Nicky Scarfo. Then again, many of he books on Scarfo barely mention "Crazy Phil" Leonetti. He typically pops out of nowhere as the underboss probably because of his blood relation to Scarfo. Most of the literature is based on events and people in Philadelphia. Scarfo emerged out of Atlantic City. Leonetti also emerges from Atlantic City which may account for why there is so little written about him or Scarfo's spectacular rise. This was the first book on the Scarfo Mob that really makes it clear that Scarfo's leadership team was the same team he had in Atlantic City. Transplanting that small organization onto the large Philadelphia Mob Family must have created some friction which Scarfo viciously sought to eliminate. Nevertheless, Leonetti's narrative does not explain Scarfo's paranoia. DelGiorno did an excellent job of describing the fear that pervaded the organization. Leonetti did not share that fear; even though he rhetorically asks "who could be next?" He does not appear to fear Scarfo the way DelGriorno and other members of the mob felt. However, what is clear is Leonetti's close relationship with Scarfo. For the first time, readers will actually hear Scarfo's own words. Leonetti is looking back at Scarfo with disgust, so there is little to nothing about building Scarfo up or viewing his rise to power. The writing is slow. The authors write out a verbatim passage from the interviews and then unpackage it a little. Sometimes they add some basic details - confirming a murder. Sometimes they describe the environment. There is not much added detail. Scarfo's street tax appears to be at the root of a lot of the violence; but the authors barely discuss it. This is contrary to Scott Burnstein's work, whose style tends to be very thorough and very rapid. Readers familiar with Burnstein will get overwhelmed with the detail. Leonetti and Graziano must have tapered those impulses and instead focused on the raw emotion that pervades this book. Leonetti certainly has remorse for the murder of Salvie Testa, even though he had no role in it. That remorse Leonetti feels is clear and powerful. More frustrating is that there is almost no discussion about how Leonetti's story differs with other narratives. Leonetti spends a lot of time building up the murder of Angelo Bruno and Scarfo's subsequent meteoric rise. It is almost as if Scarfo's ascendancy was a fluke, not something carefully orchestrated. Scarfo's close relationship with the Genovese Family in New York allowed him access to power. Leonetti reinforces that New York decided who was boss in Philadelphia, not the locals in Philadelphia. This does not appear as clear in other narratives. Leonetti's description of events in Philadelphia is not always clear possibly because he was based in Atlantic City. Major initiatives like the street tax or the revolving door of captains barely receive any detail. Leonetti casually dismisses both Caramondi and DelGiorno, which is easy to do if they had minor roles in the organization and Leonetti was in Atlantic City. But there is no description of the thought process for Scarfo promoting them within the organization. Lastly, I was hoping for an explanation for Leonetti's nickname, "Crazy Phil" beyond a journalist randomly came up with it.... Overall, this is an excellent first person account of the Scarfo Mob. There are limitations; but the pros outweigh the cons. The writing is good. The authors allow Scarfo and Leonetti to speak for themselves. Nearly a third or a quarter of the book is about Leonetti rebuilding his life after the mob. Other commentators remark that this narrative is less self-serving than others (like Sammy Gravano or Tommy DelGiorno). While Leonetti does not offer any sob story about being treated unfairly either before or after he left the mob, the book portrays him in the best possible light: a murderer who regrets his crimes and rehabilitated himself.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Soukyan Blackwood

    all reviews in one place: night mode reading ; skaitom nakties rezimu About: This is a beautiful dark story of an often romanticized topic: Mafia. Little Nicky Scarfo ruled Philly’s Mafia Family, La Cosa Nostra, this thing of ours. Under his rule everyone got out of their way, for these people, this mob, was ruthless and cruel. On some incidence a man took his own life in fear they came to brutally murder him, even though it was a mere chance. Scarfo’s nephew, Crazy Phil Leonetti ruled as all reviews in one place: night mode reading ; skaitom nakties rezimu About: This is a beautiful dark story of an often romanticized topic: Mafia. Little Nicky Scarfo ruled Philly’s Mafia Family, La Cosa Nostra, this thing of ours. Under his rule everyone got out of their way, for these people, this mob, was ruthless and cruel. On some incidence a man took his own life in fear they came to brutally murder him, even though it was a mere chance. Scarfo’s nephew, Crazy Phil Leonetti ruled as his second in command, earning his name as the crazy one, following the rules obediently, putting Family above all else, including his own son. But as time went by, and good men, loyal men died for mere fact his uncle thought they were too proud of the job they did under his orders, Phil started questioning him as the boss, and the whole structure too. And he wasn’t the only one tired of a ruthless, paranoid boss. Mine: I greatly respect people who are able to rise above their given life. Phil Leonetti is a great example of it. Born into Mob to be as good as the Prince of Crime, he obeyed, he lived it, he breathed it, and he killed for it. But he evolved when the chance presented itself, and made sure his own son didn’t have to belong the way he did. He got out when he could, and took anyone willing and able with him, in a sense. Once he saw the stupidity behind aggression, he did his best to straighten himself, and build a better life, outside of the crime for himself and his family. I wish them all luck in it. It’s a good book, good new perspective. Mafia is not Sopranos. It’s brutal, horrible, and death is easy. Being trigger happy will not keep you safe, loyalty will not keep you safe, for nobody is ever safe in a life like that. 5 out of 5, and then a few extra points for the final word of Leonetti.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michael Hames

    The narrator of the book is a bit repetitive sometimes which is why i rated it 4 stars instead of 5 but it’s a great story about the mob. Like reading real life version of The Godfather or The Sopranos. If you enjoy mob movies you will enjoy this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    The writing and dialog are a bit stereotypical "mob sayings." with an overabundance of names with variable degrees of character development. Maybe it's true to life, but the story is only moderately engaging.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Blake

    "I was practically born into a New England society of murderous sociopaths, having been brought up under the wing of the nearest silhouette of a father-figure I could find, himself a locally noted murderous sociopath. For a couple decades it was alright being a murderous sociopath in the company of murderous sociopaths, and there's no denying that our feudal profit-sharing model was at a minimum very lucrative for my father-figure. But unfortunately most of the other murderous sociopaths were in "I was practically born into a New England society of murderous sociopaths, having been brought up under the wing of the nearest silhouette of a father-figure I could find, himself a locally noted murderous sociopath. For a couple decades it was alright being a murderous sociopath in the company of murderous sociopaths, and there's no denying that our feudal profit-sharing model was at a minimum very lucrative for my father-figure. But unfortunately most of the other murderous sociopaths were in the habit of behaving like murderous sociopaths, my father-figure especially so, often killing our own murderous sociopaths for what I’d deem insufficient reasons, if only silently and to myself. We eventually drew the lethal (but ineffective) ire of still other murderous sociopaths and the decidedly non-lethal (yet very effective) wrath of the federal government. I was eventually looking at, like, the rest of my life in prison, so I decided I had no choice any longer but to sell out my father-figure and leave that life of murderous sociopathy behind me... except to remind everyone with this book that I totally was a murderous sociopath for, like, decades there in New England, and that every murderous sociopath I ratted on absolutely had it coming, and that I didn’t really have a choice anyways, so there. Thank you." Sound a little familiar at this point? Jokes aside, most books on La Cosa Nostra history are fascinating to me, but Leonetti lacks the charisma and storytelling acumen of a Henry Hill type – a dose of personality that might have at least made his lifestyle seem swashbuckling and morbidly fun or his plot arc comically absurd rather than just well-trod. Zero sensory data and a very scarce sense of humor might make Leonetti believable as an ice-cold killer, but it also means he's a pretty mediocre primary source for such a personal account of mob history. It might not just be Leonetti, though - it could also be a failing of his ghostwriters. You never get the feeling that you're actually experiencing the scene in 1970s & 80s Atlantic City, either because they couldn’t be bothered to do more research or because they weren’t talented enough to render it vividly. I think the only signifiers ever mentioned are Cutty Sark as a preferred drink and the names of streets. The authors also fail to deliver on their own teasers. They tell of meetings with Meyer Lansky in the very beginning of the book and then never actually have those meetings take place in the narrative. That felt like a deliberate fake-out, a device to make it seem like Leonetti was a part of a grander historical tradition of Mafiosi than just his own little story of an uncle and his nephew having a slow-motion falling out, but with no follow-though at all. It could be that they just wrote down everything Leonetti told them and didn’t ask many probing questions, but no reason is ever implied for Leonetti wanting to hold back on anything, and he even drops pretty obvious hints about where he currently lives under witness protection, so he's clearly not the one keeping his mouth shut on such details. Beyond that, every character is rendered flat, in the exact same mood and repeating the same stock phrases every time we see them, if even that much - several pivotal characters exist only as their name, with no further character attributes demonstrated or physical indicators given, which leaves them all in your mind as little more than a bunch of stuffed leisure suits. The narrative also shifts continually from Leonetti narrating in first person to random unnecessary recaps from a second narrator, and the fourth wall breaking so often makes for a jarring read. If you're looking for confessions of a murderous sociopath that are a bit more compelling and dark, one working primarily for La Cosa Nostra in New Jersey no less, The Ice Man by Philip Carlo, about and with the assistance of incarcerated hit man Richard Kuklinski, was alright.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Phil Villarreal

    The writing is poor, and the storytelling is mediocre. Leonetti's memoir thrives on the pure grit of his honesty, humility, shamelessness and experience. He recounts his years in the mob, and what led to his betrayal of his entire crime family and willingness to risk his own life and those of everyone he loved just to stick it to his controlling uncle, never pretending that he became a government witness for altruistic, or even pragmatic, reasons. Leonetti and his gaggle of ghostwriters spin the The writing is poor, and the storytelling is mediocre. Leonetti's memoir thrives on the pure grit of his honesty, humility, shamelessness and experience. He recounts his years in the mob, and what led to his betrayal of his entire crime family and willingness to risk his own life and those of everyone he loved just to stick it to his controlling uncle, never pretending that he became a government witness for altruistic, or even pragmatic, reasons. Leonetti and his gaggle of ghostwriters spin their yarn with the matter-of-fact sloppiness of a tired old man spilling his guts to no one in particular at a dive bar. Because he was so deeply entrenched with his subject matter, he can't help but tell a more reliable history of the fall of La Cosa Nostra than any journalist could catalogue or any novelist could dream up. His scattered, choppy prose may be agonizing at times, but he manages to translate a convincing feel of what it was like to sell your soul to the seductive greed that mob life offered him. That said, an editor who halfway paid attention could have done wonders for this mess. Characters are introduced and re-introduced over and over again in the exact same manner, nicknames and terms are given the same treatment and stories are rehashed for no apparent reason. GoodFellas this is not, but "Mafia Prince" is still vital reason for anyone who can't get enough wiseguy tales.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    "And said he gets this, and he made the sign of the gun" "Crazy Phil" Philip Leonetti is the highest ranking turn-coat in the mafia's history, I can't say I'm versed in Mafioso history so factually I can't credit or discredit it. The book is an oral history of Crazy Phil's rise, under "Little Nicky" Nicky Scarfo. What follows is a very talky and often wandering history of the ultra-violent Philly branch of La Coka Nostra. With a rotating cast of people, it gets bogged down with so many names, so "And said he gets this, and he made the sign of the gun" "Crazy Phil" Philip Leonetti is the highest ranking turn-coat in the mafia's history, I can't say I'm versed in Mafioso history so factually I can't credit or discredit it. The book is an oral history of Crazy Phil's rise, under "Little Nicky" Nicky Scarfo. What follows is a very talky and often wandering history of the ultra-violent Philly branch of La Coka Nostra. With a rotating cast of people, it gets bogged down with so many names, some famous, some not so much. Phil builds up his Uncle, as a surrogate father figure only to despise his increasingly sociopathic paranoia. The problem is there's not much beyond the verbal accounts of Leonetti, the book could be 75% factually incorrect and I wouldn't be any the wiser. Without much detail, Philadelphia and Atlantic City feel like an afterthought other than a few passages describing the fall of Atlantic City. Everything beyond opinions of other mobsters and hits is window dressing. I felt strangely disconnected from the events Phil described. There's also little insight into the mind of Phil, beyond his coldly dispassionate view of murder, and the turmoil he feels over his own life. I bounced between 2 or 3 stars, but I didn't come away with much enlightenment beyond obvious: Philly and Atlantic City in the late 70s and early 80s were not nice places, there's no honor among thieves and "this thing of ours" isn't as interesting as Hollywood.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Chumley

    Even though The Sopranos was supposedly based on a northern New Jersey crime family much of what happened in this book sounds a lot like the tv series. There's even an uncle-nephew relationship. If anything about the Mafia sounds even slightly attractive this book will show you the reality of that bizarre criminal lifestyle. The narrator of the audio version really made the book. I think if I had been reading it in a print or electronic version I might not have finished it. The narrator is the r Even though The Sopranos was supposedly based on a northern New Jersey crime family much of what happened in this book sounds a lot like the tv series. There's even an uncle-nephew relationship. If anything about the Mafia sounds even slightly attractive this book will show you the reality of that bizarre criminal lifestyle. The narrator of the audio version really made the book. I think if I had been reading it in a print or electronic version I might not have finished it. The narrator is the reason I kept listening. There were a few times where he seemed to have trouble transitioning from a character (one of the authors) and a reporter (another author) but for the most part he did an excellent job. Three stars from me is a good book. I'm stingy with stars and only a very few books get four or five stars. A three star book is a good read (no pun intended) but not a must-read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This is one of those books you wish they'd turn into a miniseries. The story is everything you could ever want out of a mafia book, and the best part is that it really happened! I listened to the audiobook, the narrator was fantastic! I was convinced he was Leonetti telling his story firsthand. The only drawback of the audiobook was having to memorize a lot of names. Sometimes all the family/gang members got a wee bit confusing. The author does a good job of giving you brief summaries about the This is one of those books you wish they'd turn into a miniseries. The story is everything you could ever want out of a mafia book, and the best part is that it really happened! I listened to the audiobook, the narrator was fantastic! I was convinced he was Leonetti telling his story firsthand. The only drawback of the audiobook was having to memorize a lot of names. Sometimes all the family/gang members got a wee bit confusing. The author does a good job of giving you brief summaries about the characters when they're reintroduced after so many chapters. This story had everything for me, comedy, suspense, murder, and close calls. I'd highly recommend this to anyone who enjoys gangster films and stories.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    If you're looking for an apologetic feel good story of redemption, this isn't it. I think the refreshing thing about this book is that Phil Leonetti doesn't make excuses for who he was and what he did. That was the world he was part of. Period. Him turning his life around, he equates La Cosa Nostra to Santa Claus, as in once he saw through the lies there was no reason to keep believing and carrying on in that world. The way he lays everything out, these guys were killing each other left and righ If you're looking for an apologetic feel good story of redemption, this isn't it. I think the refreshing thing about this book is that Phil Leonetti doesn't make excuses for who he was and what he did. That was the world he was part of. Period. Him turning his life around, he equates La Cosa Nostra to Santa Claus, as in once he saw through the lies there was no reason to keep believing and carrying on in that world. The way he lays everything out, these guys were killing each other left and right, and when the internal mob war started, everything gets ramped up even more. It's like murder was just a casual thing. Wild stuff.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Joe Fiorella

    This should be a movie! Why Hollywood keeps making movie after movie about Gotti or Hoffa is beyond me. This is just begging for a film adaptation! The treachery and deceit, the colorful mob characters, the slew of cinematic style mafia executions, and the dynamic between Crazy Phil and Little Nicky is incredible stuff. And it’s all true!!! A must read for anyone interested in the genre. If you’ve read and enjoyed Gravano’s Underboss, then you’ll love this!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Joel

    It's hard to like this - the amount of death at the hands of the principle author - but it is interesting historically for the Philadelphia Crime Family and the Five families of New York, if you like that sort of thing.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Blengino

    More like a 4 and a half. Awesome step into the world of La Cosa Nostra. Only complaint is that the author explained things that did not need to be explained often. Awesome book though especially for any mob fan from the Philadelphia/Atlantic City area.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Davi Kladakis

    I have loved mafia books, documenterys, and movies since I was in my early 20's. I'm kind of a purest when it comes down to it. So trust me when I give a mafia book 5 stars. It was open, honest and most important raw.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lainey

    This book is a glimpse into La Cosa Nostra written by a once, high ranking member of the mob who got sickened by the life and, once jailed decided to work with the FBI. Ballsy book

  19. 5 out of 5

    Julie Clark

    I am fairly certain half this book is just names but it was entertaining none the less.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Hall

    It was a good book. I enjoyed it. The story came across as authentic. If you enjoyed the Godfather, and or Goodfellas, you would enjoy this book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Marcus

    Now My favorite book!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Johnny

    A little redundant in areas. They must of used the phrase: La Cosa Nostra 1ooo times... It was kind of annoying. But the story is strong. Well done.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Darcy Bellows-Mascorro

    Plays better than a hollywood film, sometimes truth is stranger than fiction

  24. 5 out of 5

    Janet Veidt

    Good read A great look inside the minds of people in the mafia. I recommend it to anyone who is far images by the mob.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Erick Njenga

    Great insight into the workings of the mob in the 80s

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bill Weisensel

    Thoroughly enjoyed this book. A fascinating story about a world that I knew very little about. Great read!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brooks Kohler

    Good read. Strong stuff with a macabre sense of humor.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Xenia

    The story line was is interesting but the writing is elementary. He did a good job explaining the Cosa Nostra and everyone's place in Philly. But there was alot of repetition.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Janet Goldberg

    Okay. Interesting. I remember a lot of the history, but found the story telling average.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Eric Pool

    Truly one of the best Mafioso biographies. Very detailed, he has a tremendous recollection and I believe everything to be true as I fact checked a lot. Well written, highly recommend.

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