counter create hit Paul and Palestinian Judaism - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Paul and Palestinian Judaism

Availability: Ready to download

Paul and Palestinian Judaism compares Judaism, understood on its own terms, with Paul, understood on his own terms. Sanders aims to: Consider methodologically how to compare two (or more) related but different religions destroy the view of Rabinic Judaism which is still prevalent in much, perhaps most, New Testament scholarship establish a different view of Rabbinic Judais Paul and Palestinian Judaism compares Judaism, understood on its own terms, with Paul, understood on his own terms. Sanders aims to: Consider methodologically how to compare two (or more) related but different religions destroy the view of Rabinic Judaism which is still prevalent in much, perhaps most, New Testament scholarship establish a different view of Rabbinic Judaism argue a case concerning Palestinian Judaism as a whole argue for a certain understanding of Paul carry out a comparison of Paul and Palestinian JudaismThis volume makes a contribution not only to the understanding of Paul and his relationship to Judaism, but also to the study of Judaism itself.


Compare
Ads Banner

Paul and Palestinian Judaism compares Judaism, understood on its own terms, with Paul, understood on his own terms. Sanders aims to: Consider methodologically how to compare two (or more) related but different religions destroy the view of Rabinic Judaism which is still prevalent in much, perhaps most, New Testament scholarship establish a different view of Rabbinic Judais Paul and Palestinian Judaism compares Judaism, understood on its own terms, with Paul, understood on his own terms. Sanders aims to: Consider methodologically how to compare two (or more) related but different religions destroy the view of Rabinic Judaism which is still prevalent in much, perhaps most, New Testament scholarship establish a different view of Rabbinic Judaism argue a case concerning Palestinian Judaism as a whole argue for a certain understanding of Paul carry out a comparison of Paul and Palestinian JudaismThis volume makes a contribution not only to the understanding of Paul and his relationship to Judaism, but also to the study of Judaism itself.

30 review for Paul and Palestinian Judaism

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    Fortunately the exhaustive footnote references are at the bottom of each page, rather than at the end of each chapter, or even worse, the end of the book. I wasn't sure if i should even list books like this here. If you're into this sort of thing, then you already know who E.P Sanders is, and how many of his works, especially this one, challenged the prevalent Billerbeck/Kittel thinking of the time. This is NOT a Theological approach. This is a historical and cultural approach taking advantage o Fortunately the exhaustive footnote references are at the bottom of each page, rather than at the end of each chapter, or even worse, the end of the book. I wasn't sure if i should even list books like this here. If you're into this sort of thing, then you already know who E.P Sanders is, and how many of his works, especially this one, challenged the prevalent Billerbeck/Kittel thinking of the time. This is NOT a Theological approach. This is a historical and cultural approach taking advantage of the abundance of Hebrew, rabbinic, and tannaitic literature, written before, during, and after the first century.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chris Coffman

    The second book in this series of outstanding books with a poignant back story associated with them is PAUL AND PALESTINIAN JUDAISM by E. P. Sanders. A breakthrough book on the subject, it is dedicated “In memory of Susan Phillips, July 2 1947 – September 26 1975. PAUL AND PALESTINIAN JUDAISM was so important because it was really the first major work to get both Christian and Jewish scholars focused on the deep and complex links between first century Judaism and the first century heresy of Judai The second book in this series of outstanding books with a poignant back story associated with them is PAUL AND PALESTINIAN JUDAISM by E. P. Sanders. A breakthrough book on the subject, it is dedicated “In memory of Susan Phillips, July 2 1947 – September 26 1975. PAUL AND PALESTINIAN JUDAISM was so important because it was really the first major work to get both Christian and Jewish scholars focused on the deep and complex links between first century Judaism and the first century heresy of Judaism which became known as Christianity. Much New Testament scholarship by English but especially German scholars who were fluent in Greek (the so-called "High Criticsm" of the late 19th century) emphasised the radical differences between first century Judaism and Pauline theology. This emphasis both co-existed and fed a wider, diffuse, and intellectually groundless anti-Semitism, to which it seemed to lend a certain legitimacy. By drawing attention to the many similarities between first century Judaism and the Jewish movement which became known as Christianity, Sanders began a healing process which for the last generation has led to a growing movement of scholarship, by both Christian and Jewish scholars, which has gone a long way to bridge tragic old misunderstandings. The last paragraph of the Preface expands as follows: “The principal burden of preparing the manuscript for the press was carried by Susan Phillips. Between 1969 and late 1975 she helped organise and carry out my administrative duties so that I would have time for research and writing, typed almost countless drafts of various parts of the manuscript, conformed the footnote and manuscript style to the requirements of the press, checked the English language quotations in Chapter I and Chapter III, and finally prepared, in the first twenty days of September, 1975, an almost flawless typescript of some 1,100 pages. For these things alone I would have recorded my warmest admiration, respect and gratitude. But, when she died, we had been looking forward to a long and happy life together; this book is offered as a memorial to her and that hope.”

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lu Tsun

    REVIEW Sanders, E. P. Paul and Palestinian Judaism. London: SCM, 1977. Sanders is credited for his thesis of “covenantal nomism” in the first-century Palestinian Judaism as a religion of God’s gracious election of Israel people and the promise of collective redemption. Sanders argued that the traditional Christian interpretation that Paul’s polemics being against Rabbinic legalism was misunderstanding, and the interpretation of Paul’s doctrines was misguided by a level of individualism that was n REVIEW Sanders, E. P. Paul and Palestinian Judaism. London: SCM, 1977. Sanders is credited for his thesis of “covenantal nomism” in the first-century Palestinian Judaism as a religion of God’s gracious election of Israel people and the promise of collective redemption. Sanders argued that the traditional Christian interpretation that Paul’s polemics being against Rabbinic legalism was misunderstanding, and the interpretation of Paul’s doctrines was misguided by a level of individualism that was not present in Paul’s historical context. Paul’s religion was not radically different from the Jewish religion of the first-century in terms of their common pattern of covenantal nomism. The key difference between pre-Christian Judaism and Pauline teaching resides in the principle of how a person participates in the People of God: the Jewish principle was by virtue of God’s covenant with Abraham plus one’s staying in the covenant with the keeping of the Law. But Paul’s principle was through faith in Christ, and one still in need of demonstrating God’s grace through good deeds. Paul’s version of covenantal nomism is christological. The comprehensive examination of Sanders’ thesis has been done in Justification and Variegated Nomism (edited by Carson, D. A., Peter T. O’Brien, and Mark A. Seifrid. Grand Rapids: Baker; Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2001.) With the increasing knowledge of the early Judaism in the scholarship, Sanders remains influential in the New Perspective of Paul, however his thesis is considered inconclusive and need more qualification.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    E. P. Sanders does a good job at bringing attention to second temple sources. His thesis though of covenantal nomism is flawed. He cherry picks from the plethora of second temple sources and deals most with text that seemingly agree with his thesis that election into the people of God is by God's grace and the ability to remain saved in Gods community. overall though it is a good and easy read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Quient

    I can see why this was a game-changer in Pauline studies. Incisive. As objective as one can attempt to be. Persuasive. A great and insightful challenge to our modern readings of ancient Jewish texts. Worth your time. NQ

  6. 4 out of 5

    Graham

    I've been working on this one on and off for over two years now. It's an important work in the recent history of Pauline Studies, launching what came to be known as the New Perspective on Paul (NPP). There are some nit-picky issues which have been critiqued by detractors, and tidied up by other NPP folks who came after Sanders (Wright, Dunn, McKnight, etc.). Sanders has provided many important corrections the predominent readings of Paul and his relationship to Judaism in protestant (esp. Luther I've been working on this one on and off for over two years now. It's an important work in the recent history of Pauline Studies, launching what came to be known as the New Perspective on Paul (NPP). There are some nit-picky issues which have been critiqued by detractors, and tidied up by other NPP folks who came after Sanders (Wright, Dunn, McKnight, etc.). Sanders has provided many important corrections the predominent readings of Paul and his relationship to Judaism in protestant (esp. Lutheran) theology which depicted Paul's notions of justification by faith as a direct polemic against a "works righteousness" of Judaism. This, argues Sanders is a misreading of both Paul and Judaism. Though works are certainly a major factor in Jewish identity, and indispensable for understandings of punishment and righteousness. But, Sanders demonstrates fair well that no major Jewish group prior to or contemporary with Paul taught that works could *earn* salvation. Instead, Sanders points out that salvation was primarily covenantal. God in his grace and election made a covenant with Abraham and Israel to bind himself to them, and that belonging to that covenant was the means of salvation. This belonging was a birthright of Israelites. So keeping of the Law was not a means to get into the covenant, but a means remaining in. Paul's objection then is to those who insisted that Gentiles must become Jewish through taking on the burden of Jewish rites, customs, and Law keeping. Paul is saying that the entrance into God's people is not through Israelite identity but the faithfulness of God, revealed most fully and effectively in Jesus Christ. This corrective has needed some important nuances, but the essence does seem to be correct in my estimation. The formatting and style of the book is a bit tough, and the sections addressing the history of interpretation (especially the German school of the 19th and early 20th centuries) is really dry, and there is a certain lack of balance between the space given to Rabbinic Judaism and other sects, and the amount of space given to Judaism vs the space given to Paul, and the comparative work is left mostly to the reader. But for the student of the New Testament, and Paul in particular, this is an important resource, and should be part of the conversation. Even where disagreements arise, Sanders is still a key voice in the conversation, and this book is of particular note. It's heavy slugging at times, but ultimately worthwhile.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Will Hawkins

    Very dense. Lots of intellectual shorthand and insider references to other work. When referring to technical terms from source material written in languages other than Enlgish, the terms were never translated which made the discussion more difficult to follow. However, the book changed my mind about Judaism and Paul's meaning. I honestly highly recommend this book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Pastor Matt

    Sanders' thesis was a bombshell but over the years it has come to light that he has tried to overly systematize Second Temple Jewish texts and dismissed any counter evidence. In the end, and in the ghastly light of the holocaust, one can understand his intent, but he missed that legalism, self-righteousness, a merit based system of thinking, etc. is endemic to the human condition.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Brian Chilton

    Good Book but Don't Agree w. Conclusions Sanders's work is a must read for anyone interested in Pauline studies. While I appreciate his work, I do not agree with his covenantal nomism. I think the forensic approach is much better.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laura Robinson

    What am I going to do, give this book a bad review?

  11. 5 out of 5

    James Korsmo

    Few books have impacted biblical studies in the past decades more than E. P. Sanders' Paul and Palestinian Judaism. This groundbreaking book has been instrumental in a reevaluation of many long-held presuppositions about Judaism at the time of Paul and Jesus, and about how Paul related to that heritage. I've long heard it referred to, cited, and criticized, so I thought it was finally time that I read it for myself. And I'm extremely glad I did. First, a word about my reading, which was a bit sel Few books have impacted biblical studies in the past decades more than E. P. Sanders' Paul and Palestinian Judaism. This groundbreaking book has been instrumental in a reevaluation of many long-held presuppositions about Judaism at the time of Paul and Jesus, and about how Paul related to that heritage. I've long heard it referred to, cited, and criticized, so I thought it was finally time that I read it for myself. And I'm extremely glad I did. First, a word about my reading, which was a bit selective. I chose to read the conclusions he draws at the close of the first two thirds of the book, dealing with his reevaluation of Judaism and his assertion of "covenantal nomism" as the overriding framework at the turn of the era. I then read the remainder of the book, dealing specifically with Paul and his relation to the Judaism of his day as reconstructed by Sanders. I'm not competent to comment on the foundational aspect of his thesis that Judaism is typified in Paul's day by covenantal nomism, that entry into the covenant was by God's grace and that works served to maintain that relationship as a way of staying in, other than to say it is obvious that Sanders was instrumental in awakening a reappraisal of the sources and a questioning of some long-held assumptions. I have found it to be a compelling argument, even if not completely convincing on all counts. His chapters on Paul are uniformly well written and well argued. His foundational claim is that Paul reasoned from solution to plight, and not the other way around, so that the driving force in Paul's thinking was not what was wrong with Judaism or the Law or with humanity in general, but instead by his conviction that Jesus Christ is Lord and is the only way for salvation. This basic premise causes a reevaluation of Paul's thought process and illuminates Paul's thinking in a fresh way. Instead of focusing on justification by faith as the peak of Paul's theological reasoning (his "pattern" of religion in Sanders' terminology), participation with Christ moves more toward center stage. It is the need of Jesus Christ as Lord that is the decisive factor in his distancing himself from Law observance: not that it is futile or wrong-headed or unable to attain righteousness, even if these are also his conclusions, but first and foremost that it isn't focused on Jesus Christ as Lord. His focus on the participationist stream of Paul's thinking is especially enlightening, as he shows how important the theme of dying with Christ is to Paul's understanding of salvation. In his discussion of works, Sanders asserts that "Salvation by grace is not incompatible with punishment and reward for deeds," (517) and that is the position he asserts as Paul's. With regard to covenantal nomism, he says that Paul's view of works is in perfect agreement (518) with the Judaism of his day, but (and this is an important qualifier) Paul's pattern of religion is fundamentally different than covenantal nomism. He stresses this a number of times, asserting that while there is substantial agreement, there is a basic difference (548). That difference is Christ. Paul's pattern of religion, described as "participationist eschatology," is typified by participation in Christ, a change in lordship from the lordship of the flesh or sin to Christ, and being under grace instead of under the law. It is a transfer that takes place, and that is decisive. Even though Paul does spend a good bit of time talking about the role of works, and is rightly concerned with justification by faith, which Sanders includes in his scheme, it is Christ that takes center stage, and union with Christ that is the driving force of his thought. Anything that is pointing toward a different goal is entirely useless, and thus the observance of the Law in order to obtain righteousness is not so much destructive or in need of reformation as it is working in a totally different order than union with Christ. Even though his discussion of Paul isn't much more than a hundred pages, this short review can only scratch the surface of this seminal work. I came to it with a pretty good acquaintance with many critiques of Sanders' work, and I look forward to continuing to sift this great piece of reasoning and argument. At the very least, it is abundantly clear that he has brought to light a number of themes in Paul that are too often underplayed or subordinated (such as participation or lordship), or at least, that were until after he published this study. I look forward to continuing to study Paul's theology and soteriology, and this important work is clearly one of the indispensable stopping points along that way.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

    Sanders painstakingly explores key themes in second temple Judaism from tannaitic writings, Dead Sea Scrolls and various apocryphal works. He builds up the case that Jews at the time of Paul's writings generally had a notion of covenantal nomism, that being a part of Israel puts one in the covenant and obeying the law maintains that status. Transgressions are dealt with via repentance and appropriate temple sacrifice. The concept of election is generally a corporate one including all of Israel, Sanders painstakingly explores key themes in second temple Judaism from tannaitic writings, Dead Sea Scrolls and various apocryphal works. He builds up the case that Jews at the time of Paul's writings generally had a notion of covenantal nomism, that being a part of Israel puts one in the covenant and obeying the law maintains that status. Transgressions are dealt with via repentance and appropriate temple sacrifice. The concept of election is generally a corporate one including all of Israel, except in the case perhaps of the Qumran community which excluded non sectarian Israelites from election. Likewise another notable exception to these general patterns is IV Ezra which sets a very high bar for covenantal maintenance and seems to require near perfect obedience. These exceptions serve to highlight the rule however, that Jews understood God's grace and mercy perfectly well and understood that repentance was the way to deal with transgression. Paul understood these themes perfectly well but worked from a different model altogether. Paul insisted that obedience of the law maintains one in covenant which has the wrong ends. Sanders argues that Paul starts from assuming the overarching significance of the death and resurrection of Jesus is central. He then argues that the best way to interpret Paul is from his participatory rhetoric. The key is to belong to the body of Christ, to walk in the Spirit, and maintenance of that requires basic obedience. The basic reality is those who belong to the body of Christ, and are freed from the power of sin, and those who do not and are perishing. Another key theme is the Lordship of Christ, those who belong to Christ are saved by him. Sanders argues that the German scholars, with their focus on righteousness and faith in a jurist miss what is more properly seen as the governing framework of Paul's thought. While Paul does talk about righteousness the usage is secondary. The key of faith, of believing, is that it admits one to the body of Christ, and then one is found righteous. Sanders covers a lot of ground and by the time his analysis of Paul is reached in the last fifth of the book much of what he had discuss in its details had faded away. I would have preferred a more interactive approach, including analysis of Paul's thought throughout.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Josh Washington

    Sanders’ book is a watershed in studies on Judaism and will be remembered for a long time. In light of his work he has deepened my understanding of Judaism, consequently the Old and New Testaments. The book is long and academic. It engages with large amounts of scholarly material. So I wouldn’t encourage mainstream Christians to read it. That being said, I’d recommend this book to theologically educated Christians interested in getting a first-hand view of Sanders work. Too many people simply dism Sanders’ book is a watershed in studies on Judaism and will be remembered for a long time. In light of his work he has deepened my understanding of Judaism, consequently the Old and New Testaments. The book is long and academic. It engages with large amounts of scholarly material. So I wouldn’t encourage mainstream Christians to read it. That being said, I’d recommend this book to theologically educated Christians interested in getting a first-hand view of Sanders work. Too many people simply dismiss him by reading reviews of his work. I don’t think it’s fair to pass him off without reading him directly. I don’t know much about Judaism, but even I could see he has an amazing grasp of the Jewish sources and his interaction with his academic peers is good. He has highlighted very well that scholarship can be very biased and dismissive of evidence if it conflicts with tradition. https://thescripturesays.org/2016/06/...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Spencer

    Classic formulation of the New Perspective on Paul. Sanders offers the groundbreaking work which sets the stage for Dunn and Wright. He draws his roots from Bultmann, Schweizer, and other form critics but overturns their representation of Palestinian Judaism. This work is a true representation of meticulous scholarship. Yet one is left wondering, at the conclusion, whether Sanders fully understood the implications of his conclusion and how that might be implemented accurately. His study of Paul l Classic formulation of the New Perspective on Paul. Sanders offers the groundbreaking work which sets the stage for Dunn and Wright. He draws his roots from Bultmann, Schweizer, and other form critics but overturns their representation of Palestinian Judaism. This work is a true representation of meticulous scholarship. Yet one is left wondering, at the conclusion, whether Sanders fully understood the implications of his conclusion and how that might be implemented accurately. His study of Paul leaves much to be desired and is ultimately inconclusive and his conclusion does, somewhat, seem to contradict some of his earlier work in the book. I haven't taken the time to explore the breath of responses, reviews, and revisions of this theory so my thoughts are very inconclusive at this point. An important read for any NT student even if a bit tedious.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brent Hudson

    Great book. I would rated it higher if Sanders had given some credit to other scholars who previously had published similar ideas about Paul's relationship with Judaism. A tip of the hat to R.N. Longenecker for his "Paul, apostle of liberty" published in the 60's would have seemed appropriate. Nevertheless, this is a classic work and a must read for Pauline studies.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Wyatt Houtz

    Very helpful book on the New Perspective on Paul.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Robert Martin

  18. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

  19. 4 out of 5

    Trevena Hanna

  20. 5 out of 5

    Evan Knies

  21. 4 out of 5

    Husein

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kent

  23. 5 out of 5

    J. David Knecht

  24. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Colvin

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michael D Reichard

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gilbert michaud

  27. 5 out of 5

    David Rawls

  28. 4 out of 5

    Adam Gossman

  29. 5 out of 5

    Laughing Scholar

  30. 5 out of 5

    Matt Lemieux

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.