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In this innovative study, Positive Pollutions and Cultural Toxins, John Blair Gamber examines urbanity and the results of urban living—traffic, garbage, sewage, waste, and pollution—arguing for a new recognition of all forms of human detritus as part of the natural world and thus for a broadening of our understanding of environmental literature.     While much of the discours In this innovative study, Positive Pollutions and Cultural Toxins, John Blair Gamber examines urbanity and the results of urban living—traffic, garbage, sewage, waste, and pollution—arguing for a new recognition of all forms of human detritus as part of the natural world and thus for a broadening of our understanding of environmental literature.     While much of the discourse surrounding the United States’ idealistic and nostalgic views of itself privileges “clean” living (primarily in rural, small-town, and suburban settings), representations of rurality and urbanity by Chicanas/Chicanos, African Americans, Asian Americans, and Native Americans, on the other hand, complicate such generalization. Gamber widens our understanding of current ecocritical debates by examining texts by such authors as Octavia Butler, Louise Erdrich, Alejandro Morales, Gerald Vizenor, and Karen Tei Yamashita that draw on the physical signs of human corporeality to refigure cities and urbanity as natural. He demonstrates how ethnic American literature reclaims waste objects and waste spaces—likening pollution to miscegenation—as a method to revalue cast-off and marginalized individuals and communities. Positive Pollutions and Cultural Toxins explores the conjunction of, and the frictions between, twentieth-century U.S. postcolonial studies, race studies, urban studies, and ecocriticism, and works to refigure this portrayal of urban spaces.


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In this innovative study, Positive Pollutions and Cultural Toxins, John Blair Gamber examines urbanity and the results of urban living—traffic, garbage, sewage, waste, and pollution—arguing for a new recognition of all forms of human detritus as part of the natural world and thus for a broadening of our understanding of environmental literature.     While much of the discours In this innovative study, Positive Pollutions and Cultural Toxins, John Blair Gamber examines urbanity and the results of urban living—traffic, garbage, sewage, waste, and pollution—arguing for a new recognition of all forms of human detritus as part of the natural world and thus for a broadening of our understanding of environmental literature.     While much of the discourse surrounding the United States’ idealistic and nostalgic views of itself privileges “clean” living (primarily in rural, small-town, and suburban settings), representations of rurality and urbanity by Chicanas/Chicanos, African Americans, Asian Americans, and Native Americans, on the other hand, complicate such generalization. Gamber widens our understanding of current ecocritical debates by examining texts by such authors as Octavia Butler, Louise Erdrich, Alejandro Morales, Gerald Vizenor, and Karen Tei Yamashita that draw on the physical signs of human corporeality to refigure cities and urbanity as natural. He demonstrates how ethnic American literature reclaims waste objects and waste spaces—likening pollution to miscegenation—as a method to revalue cast-off and marginalized individuals and communities. Positive Pollutions and Cultural Toxins explores the conjunction of, and the frictions between, twentieth-century U.S. postcolonial studies, race studies, urban studies, and ecocriticism, and works to refigure this portrayal of urban spaces.

18 review for Positive Pollutions and Cultural Toxins: Waste and Contamination in Contemporary U.S. Ethnic Literatures

  1. 4 out of 5

    sdw

    This is a book focused on pollution and waste. Gamber counters the problematic ideology of racial purity underwriting most conceptions of "pollution" by suggesting forms of "positive pollutions" that suggest the positive permeability of boundaries between people and nature, borders, and different groups of humans. It is an embrace of hybridity. Gamber finds the concept of "toxicity" one more useful to denote what otherwise might be called pollution, focusing on it as a poison. His interest toxic This is a book focused on pollution and waste. Gamber counters the problematic ideology of racial purity underwriting most conceptions of "pollution" by suggesting forms of "positive pollutions" that suggest the positive permeability of boundaries between people and nature, borders, and different groups of humans. It is an embrace of hybridity. Gamber finds the concept of "toxicity" one more useful to denote what otherwise might be called pollution, focusing on it as a poison. His interest toxicity is not just material toxicity but the belief systems that can be thought of a cultural toxins. Along with these important contributions, Gamber writes a book focused on urban environments and on texts by a compelling variety of authors including Octavia Butler, Alejandro Morales, Louis Erdrich, Karen Tei Yamashita, and Gerald Vizenor.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Joanne Gass

    A very good analysis of novels written by Native American, Hispanic, and Asian American authors, Gamber expands the boundaries of eco-criticism to include urban ecology. Obviously, this is a book for scholars; I think it will be very useful for both students and specialists. And, I enjoyed the read.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Cody

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Bennett

  5. 5 out of 5

    Joe

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Henrichs

  7. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

  8. 5 out of 5

    Travis

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mika Kennedy

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ulan

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ruby

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jobber

  13. 4 out of 5

    Md. Fahad Kabir Antim

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kimi

  15. 4 out of 5

    Heejoo Park

  16. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

  17. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Copolov

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Stern

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