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Welcome to the Revised and Expanded Edition of the New York Times bestseller. The New Edition includes astonishing photos that NASA is unable to cover-up of architectural formations on the Moon and Mars.


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Welcome to the Revised and Expanded Edition of the New York Times bestseller. The New Edition includes astonishing photos that NASA is unable to cover-up of architectural formations on the Moon and Mars.

30 review for Dark Mission: The Secret History of NASA

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten

    Richard C. Hoagland is a real piece of work. The guy believes that the "Face on Mars" is a sculpture (despite all evidence to the contrary) and that it's surrounded by a ruined Martian city. He believes there are the remains of crystaline ruins on the Moon, and the reason the astronauts don't remember seeing them is that they've been brainwashed. Furthermore, the Real Truth about ancient alien civilizations is being suppressed by NASA, which is under the control of some kind of mystery cult. Mas Richard C. Hoagland is a real piece of work. The guy believes that the "Face on Mars" is a sculpture (despite all evidence to the contrary) and that it's surrounded by a ruined Martian city. He believes there are the remains of crystaline ruins on the Moon, and the reason the astronauts don't remember seeing them is that they've been brainwashed. Furthermore, the Real Truth about ancient alien civilizations is being suppressed by NASA, which is under the control of some kind of mystery cult. Masons are involved somewhere in there, as is the Kennedy asassination. He's the master of misinterpreting photographs, which makes the whole thing kind of entertaining: a fuzzy blob in the background of a moonscape because a castle suspended by cables, high above the lunar surface. Non-color-corrected photos of Mars that seem to show green blotches (due to the way the images are processed) are proof that there is plant life on Mars. Have I mentioned that Hoagland refers to himself in the third person for the entire book? And that the Sun is a hyperspacial gateway? (that one isn't really explained particularly well...) At any rate, I'd give this zero stars for scientific accuracy, four stars for entertainment value -- I figure it averages out to two...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Owlseyes

    Last Friday (19th of June) I had read that Russia wanted an "international investigation" on the "obscure moon landings" of the period 1969-1972. After watching the documentary ("Moon Rising") by Jose Escamilla, you'll certainly be in the position of wanting to know more and quite suspicious on the pictorial narrative you've been fed so far. In the words of Mike Bara, who was prompted by the research of Richard Hoagland, you'll start wondering about a "secret space program", a Last Friday (19th of June) I had read that Russia wanted an "international investigation" on the "obscure moon landings" of the period 1969-1972. After watching the documentary ("Moon Rising") by Jose Escamilla, you'll certainly be in the position of wanting to know more and quite suspicious on the pictorial narrative you've been fed so far. In the words of Mike Bara, who was prompted by the research of Richard Hoagland, you'll start wondering about a "secret space program", a populated moon, whether by aliens or by man. In the documentary someone says it's "the greatest story ever denied". Curiously enough it is referred one hacker once had access to the NASA's listings; in those, were printed this: "non-terrestrial officers". - Who are they? Jose Escamilla had a tremendous work of "recovering " blurred (on purpose) photographs; his work is amazing; he still wonders why the 1999 Hubble photos of the moon were all black and white. By giving them color his results will boggle any eye. Stefen Auten: "Why NASA hasn't told us?". Moreover: NASA 2009 bombing of the moon

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    It's easy to dismiss the authors' claims of artifacts of intelligent design on the moon and Mars as well as the existence of three "secret society" factions embedded in NASA in its earlier years when the information is just blatantly presented. I've read Hoagland's earlier work, The Monuments of Mars, and I must admit that his research tactics and reasoning have remained consistent in the twenty or so years since that book was published. Do I believe everything that the authors claim in this new It's easy to dismiss the authors' claims of artifacts of intelligent design on the moon and Mars as well as the existence of three "secret society" factions embedded in NASA in its earlier years when the information is just blatantly presented. I've read Hoagland's earlier work, The Monuments of Mars, and I must admit that his research tactics and reasoning have remained consistent in the twenty or so years since that book was published. Do I believe everything that the authors claim in this new tome? No. Do they present their case in a careful, documented, honest manner? Yes. The book is rather dry, but that's not necessarily a criticism. To approach this information with several degrees of seriousness is far better than falling into some New Age Crap a la David Icke (though, some of his research is actually solid and corroborated, he just spins into wild speculation too often). Having said that, I will address my views of the information presented in Dark Mission briefly. Hoagland and Bara's claims of ancient, ruined glass structures on the moon is difficult for me to accept based on the photographic evidence they provide. I just don't see it 75% of the time. Some aspects, of their moon theories have a ring of truth to them (and, for the record, they dismiss the "faked moon landings" theories at the outset, as do I), especially when NASA's true inception as a "defense agency" is taken into account. This is indisputable fact. NASA's inconsistencies and possible cover-ups and suppression of information is well-documented and corroborated by other sources, so it is completely within the realm of possibility that ancient, ruined structures have been discovered on Mars and spun into the areas of speculation by an organization that is bound to keep "defense secrets" and prevent "public panic" based on a Brookings Institute report circa 1950's.Incidentally, the existence of this Brookings report is also known fact, however we could debate its influence on government agencies' policies, though such findings have been followed in other areas by the federal government to a "T" over the years. At the very least, the authors make a strong case for anomalies on both Luna and Mars that bear further study, and provide evidence (in the case of Mars) that NASA has clandestinely pursued further studies, only to dismiss claims of artifacts with the same tactics again and again. Interestingly, the authors' claims about the influence of three secret societies within NASA (in its early years, anyway) is what ostracized them from other Mars Monument researchers, and these are the claims that I find the MOST believable. It's true that Nazis were recruited into various positions within the government following World War II. It's also true that Jack Parsons, co-founder of JPL, was heavily into occult rituals and practices. And it's also true that Freemasonry has always had a strange, strong hold over many aspects of our government (see The Secret Architecture of Our Nation's Capital: The Masons and the Building of Washington, D.C. by David Ovason, as well as several works by Manly P. Hall). Hoagland and Bara stretch the theories of ritual dates a little thin towards the end of the book, losing the string of actual ritualistic dates and practices and unnecessarily replacing them with sort-of trivial NASA anniversary dates. The case for secret societies' involvement in setting NASA plan and policies had been made, and was substantiated through the '70's. Beyond that, the evidence gets thin. In my opinion, any free-thinking, reasonably intelligent person will finish this book and, at the very least, question what information has been disseminated from what many believed (erroneously) was a civilian institution dedicated to the exploration of space. Our solar system (not to mention Earth and the universe itself) is a vast and mysterious place and to assume that we have learned even 1% of its secrets is incredibly arrogant. This book is recommended for anyone who has a strong curiosity about outer space, Man's place in the universe and history, and, of course, people who find "conspiracy theories" (though I now, generally, despise that term) interesting.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kimber

    Richard Hoagland is most famous as the science advisor who brought forth to the masses the "face on Mars" photographic evidence. He since has specialized in esoteric information involving the NASA space program. However, in order to find the facts and actual evidence you must wade through a terribly tedious and even narcissistic writing style to get to these theories. Hoagland does present a great deal of factual testimony, but at the same time he can be illogical and irrelevelant, pedantic and Richard Hoagland is most famous as the science advisor who brought forth to the masses the "face on Mars" photographic evidence. He since has specialized in esoteric information involving the NASA space program. However, in order to find the facts and actual evidence you must wade through a terribly tedious and even narcissistic writing style to get to these theories. Hoagland does present a great deal of factual testimony, but at the same time he can be illogical and irrelevelant, pedantic and overly-speculative, jumping to conclusions, and coming across as a "Know-It-All." I don't see how he can expect the public to accept his thesis based on his flimsy argument. No matter how much he speculates and obsesses over it and makes all kinds of claims, does not make anything he is saying proven to be true. And he even feels quite at ease slamming others as Not Being Scientific. When he actually acts as if just because his wife saw in the photographs precisely what he wanted her to, THAT is "incontrovertible" proof. But instead of relying on Science, he keeps insisting he has all the answers and inserts himself into the narrative time and time again--always wanting credit more than finding the truth. He simply is not credible enough as a researcher.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Les Gehman

    O.K. I bought this book from hamiltonbook.com because the description sounded interesting. (BTW, hamiltonbook.com rocks, it's not their fault that this book is a crock of shit.) I didn't notice who the author was. Richard Hoagland is a fucking quack. It's a decade after the "face" on Mars has been thoroughly de-bunked and he's still trying to sell this shit. He's a fucking idiot. I'll still probably read this book just to see how whacked out it is. But I'm sure there's no astronomy or astrophysi O.K. I bought this book from hamiltonbook.com because the description sounded interesting. (BTW, hamiltonbook.com rocks, it's not their fault that this book is a crock of shit.) I didn't notice who the author was. Richard Hoagland is a fucking quack. It's a decade after the "face" on Mars has been thoroughly de-bunked and he's still trying to sell this shit. He's a fucking idiot. I'll still probably read this book just to see how whacked out it is. But I'm sure there's no astronomy or astrophysics here. I've thumbed thru the book and it's still all the same "face" on Mars, and there's "condominiums" on Mars type of bullshit. I think this is a minimum 6 beer book. I'll attempt to read it, but I warn you now that it may get launched into orbit at any time. (Yes, I've had a few beers tonight, but I can still tell bullshit when I see it.)

  6. 4 out of 5

    John

    I honestly don't know what to say about this book's truth-quotient. I DO know that NASA and other listed agencies ARE connected to secret societies, this has been independently verified by other sources. NASA is more interested in keeping things hidden, why else did Matlin peter out the Mars pictures, and why go to such links to make the "litter box" version of the Face on Mars if it isn't anything let the unalterated picture speak to itself and why show Mars as redder than it REALLY is? These r I honestly don't know what to say about this book's truth-quotient. I DO know that NASA and other listed agencies ARE connected to secret societies, this has been independently verified by other sources. NASA is more interested in keeping things hidden, why else did Matlin peter out the Mars pictures, and why go to such links to make the "litter box" version of the Face on Mars if it isn't anything let the unalterated picture speak to itself and why show Mars as redder than it REALLY is? These reviewers are going way too far to debunk this because they are not ready to quietly consider what is here. As to how much is truth? *shrugs* But this book does question what we thought was true, and it would be wiser to consider what it says and not throw the baby out with the bathwater. For it is also a confirmed FACT that Von Braun is a Nazi scientist from Project Paperclip. Don't listen to these scared naysaying debunkers, be a TRUE skeptic and judge this work fairly. Don't be afraid of the truth just because it hurts, but also do not be blinded into believing without questions. Questioning things keeps us from denying the truth or accepting deceptions.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tao

    "Based on our analysis as presented in this book, it is also our opinion that NASA's entire lunar exploration program—culminating with the incredibly successful manned Apollo Project—was carefully conceived, from the beginning, as a kind of 'alien reconnaissance' followed by an 'alien artifacts retrieval' program." "Based on our analysis as presented in this book, it is also our opinion that NASA's entire lunar exploration program—culminating with the incredibly successful manned Apollo Project—was carefully conceived, from the beginning, as a kind of 'alien reconnaissance' followed by an 'alien artifacts retrieval' program."

  8. 5 out of 5

    Elsie

    The first time I saw a picture of the "Face on Mars", if I remember correctly was sometime in 1997, when I was at the bookshop browsing through Graham Hancock's new release "The Mars Mystery". Must say, at the time,the topic didn't catch my interest, and I didn't feel the need to read the book. Nevertheless, that picture of the "Face" was interesting... Then, sometime in 2004, when I was reading "The Lost Book of Enki" by Zecharia Sitchin, which through exhaustive research of primary sources, an The first time I saw a picture of the "Face on Mars", if I remember correctly was sometime in 1997, when I was at the bookshop browsing through Graham Hancock's new release "The Mars Mystery". Must say, at the time,the topic didn't catch my interest, and I didn't feel the need to read the book. Nevertheless, that picture of the "Face" was interesting... Then, sometime in 2004, when I was reading "The Lost Book of Enki" by Zecharia Sitchin, which through exhaustive research of primary sources, and using actual discovered portions of the ancient Sumerian text as "scaffolding", Sitchin re-created the memoirs of Enki,the leader of these first "astronauts" of the Anunnakis and the story of their arrival on Earth from the planet Nibiru. Interestingly, the synopsis of the Fourth Tablet(Pg 84)states : "The Nibiruans hail even the small gold delivery Test the gold's use as an atmospheric shield succeed Additional heroes and new equipment are sent to Earth Gold extraction from the waters continues to disappoint Ea discover gold sources that need deep mining in the Abzu Enlil, then Anu, come to earth for cruical decisions As the half brother quarrel, lots decided the tasks Ea, renamed Enki (Earth's Master), goes to the Abzu Enlil stays to develop permanent facilities in the Edin As Anu prepares to leave, he is attacked by Alalu The Seven Who Judge sentence Alalu to exile on Lahmu Anu's daughter Ninmah, a medical officer, is sent to Earth Stopping off at Lahmu(Mars)she finds Alalu dead A rock, craved to resemble Alalu's face, serves as his tomb Anzu is given command of a Way Station on Lahmu." Well,I immediately thought of the "Face on Mars" when I read this. The fact that Sitchin was one distingushed by his ability to read Sumerian clay tablets and other ancient text - whether this was part his translation of the ancient text or through the work of his own mind, for him to write about a rock craved as a tomb on Mars to resemble a "face" of the Anunnaki resting within...certainly makes one think that there must be more.... Many may find it hard to believe what's written in Hoagland and Bara's "Dark Mission", but I guess it's really all about one's experience and how each person perceives new or forgotten information which gets presented to us again and again...and it's only through intuition and discernment that the truth shall be known. Now that it's March 2011, and right after witnessing the recent massive destruction caused by Japan's 9.0 earthquake and a 10m tsumani thereafter, reducing what used to be home towns, roads and agricultural lands to mere ruins of nothing but a mountain of waste, and in one moment of fury, Mother Nature wipes out ten of thousands of humans and animals in one go. The realisation of what nature can do, and not to mention about the on-going problems at the damaged nuclear plant, this would indeed changed one's perception and may just give us a better idea of what the authors were trying to do analysing the photos of the Moon and Mars to ascertain if they were there, and indeed were "artifical structures" of civilization long destroyed and now in ruins.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    I'm a complete sucker for this kind of book and when I saw it at the Liberty Science Center, I just had to buy it. But after reading, I'm a bit disappointed. To really do this kind of book right, you have to go the full crazy. And Hoagland and Bara only go about 60% crazy. I'm in no position to judge the scientific aspects of their thesis - alternate modes of physics really aren't my bag, nor are photographic enhancement techniques. As for the political aspects (essentially that if NASA found evi I'm a complete sucker for this kind of book and when I saw it at the Liberty Science Center, I just had to buy it. But after reading, I'm a bit disappointed. To really do this kind of book right, you have to go the full crazy. And Hoagland and Bara only go about 60% crazy. I'm in no position to judge the scientific aspects of their thesis - alternate modes of physics really aren't my bag, nor are photographic enhancement techniques. As for the political aspects (essentially that if NASA found evidence of aliens, they wouldn't tell the public in order to prevent a panic), it makes sense, although I have my doubts of the ability of any large organization to retain confidential information for any extended period of time. Oh, and the cover is a sucker play: this is not really a book about how Freemasons run NASA. There is really just one chapter about that and even then, it's mixed up with Nazis and "Magicians" as the three secret societies that have controlled the NASA hierarchy since its founding. Still, worth a read. And I'm guessing there is a lot of material online (or even in other reviews) refuting this book, but what's the fun in that?

  10. 4 out of 5

    Frank

    Hoagland is a menace. His credentials are over-exaggerated and his NASA theories are harmful to the actual good that the organization produces. No government agency is without sin, but this isn't the book to go looking for factual dark secrets. Hoagland sets himself up as a purveyor of scientific theories but he is not a scientist and thus is free from third-party verification and peer reviews. He uses distorted satellite imagery to back up his creepy claims. Domes on the moon. The face on Mars. Hoagland is a menace. His credentials are over-exaggerated and his NASA theories are harmful to the actual good that the organization produces. No government agency is without sin, but this isn't the book to go looking for factual dark secrets. Hoagland sets himself up as a purveyor of scientific theories but he is not a scientist and thus is free from third-party verification and peer reviews. He uses distorted satellite imagery to back up his creepy claims. Domes on the moon. The face on Mars. JFK's assassination. It's all in here. Even so, Hoagland's biggest sin is that as a whole his theories are boring. Even the cover photo of an astronaut planting a Masonic flag on the moon is faked!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    OK, so I like to occasionally read on the fringe conspiracy theory books, so shoot me. I may not even buy into the ideas but it does make for an interesting read now and then. Richard C. Hoaglands latest book Dark Mission deals with NASAs hidden agenda in the space program and what they choose to to tell or not tell the public about the moon and Mars. Honestly, some of the pictures Hoagland claims as proof of "ruins" on the moon just look like pixelated fuzz to me, however, at the very least th OK, so I like to occasionally read on the fringe conspiracy theory books, so shoot me. I may not even buy into the ideas but it does make for an interesting read now and then. Richard C. Hoaglands latest book Dark Mission deals with NASAs hidden agenda in the space program and what they choose to to tell or not tell the public about the moon and Mars. Honestly, some of the pictures Hoagland claims as proof of "ruins" on the moon just look like pixelated fuzz to me, however, at the very least this book does reveal a disturbing trend in NASA to withhold information that could potentially reshape our view of the space program. Many of his sources are ex members of NASA who are whistle blowers. I really doubt the validity of some claims this book makes, but at the very least, it does raise interesting points about why NASA has decided to edit so many of the photographs of Mars and the moon.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Gerald

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Dark Mission by Richard C. Hoagland and Mike Bara has to be the most astounding book I have ever read. If only a fraction of it proves true, it will still be a stunning revelation. Read the full review on my blog Boychik Lit Dark Mission by Richard C. Hoagland and Mike Bara has to be the most astounding book I have ever read. If only a fraction of it proves true, it will still be a stunning revelation. Read the full review on my blog Boychik Lit

  13. 4 out of 5

    Deb

    A very interesting read. Lots of history on the Apollo missions, cover-ups, retouched photos, Masonic involvement with Nasa and space missions. Lots of photos.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lee Ann

    rarely do I not finish a book no matter how slow it is. This is the rare choice, I will be sending it back to the library about half done and no interest in getting it again. This is a leave on the shelf for me. Pages of convoluted sentences and I am not sure I get the point. Not one for me.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dante

    Full of revelations concerning the real men, reasons and objectives behind NASA. Did you know the first flag on the moon was NOT the US stars and stripes, but a Freemasons ritual flag? True.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Sheridan

    Made up rubbish for the most part.

  17. 4 out of 5

    OmniBen

    One of my favourite works of non fiction. I can still remember seeing this book on the shelf at Borders (around a decade ago when we still had a Borders where I live). I kind of knew it would be right up my alley, although the price tag was a little hefty at the time, and I was obviously wearing my cautious and penny pinching pants whenever I saw it. This is one of the few examples when I can say that I absolutely got it wrong as I'm usually pretty accurate when it comes to judging books I won't One of my favourite works of non fiction. I can still remember seeing this book on the shelf at Borders (around a decade ago when we still had a Borders where I live). I kind of knew it would be right up my alley, although the price tag was a little hefty at the time, and I was obviously wearing my cautious and penny pinching pants whenever I saw it. This is one of the few examples when I can say that I absolutely got it wrong as I'm usually pretty accurate when it comes to judging books I won't like, although I don't like many, so its not really rocket science. A couple of years later I bought it online, and that, as they say, was that. A weighty tome, and absolutely jam packed full of information which you can read and make your mind up either way. One could easily have forgiven this for being far too dry and science-y, and with little actual entertainment value. I couldn't disagree more. The book is a page turner and then some. With personal anecdotes, stories, lies exposed and individuals nefarious deeds being unmasked, making for a highly entertaining read. Is Hoagland right about everything? I highly doubt it. Sometimes I think the man's analytical brain won't let him delve into avenues and area's of this subject matter, where the evidence, both conclusive and corroborative, is screaming out to go. Hell, if you just can't wrap your head around the fact that NASA, as well as just about every other governmental agency has at least some prior record of deception and obfuscation, then just pretend the whole thing is a rather fun and well crafted work of fiction, and you could still come away entertained by it all. Of course, I would suggest an open mind, and there is no telling where the information will lead you. With all that is going on in the world today, the lies and cover ups of NASA are certainly far away from the minds of the alternative thinker, though the deception of the human race is a rich tapestry, and this little piece of the pie being discussed here is every bit as relevant in its own way as what is currently playing out across the headlines worldwide. Even if it seems about as far away as any two subjects could be. Comes highly recommended. 4.75/5 OmniBen.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Full disclosure, I did not read the entire book. It was too bad. I read about half after skipping to sections that I hoped would be interesting. This book has many problems which go beyond the content. The writing style is amateurish with an overuse of quotation marks, contradictions and hyperbole. Almost every scientific term and point of discovery is placed in quotes as if the entirety of human knowledge is in question. The authors will quote from a source only to paraphrase it in the next para Full disclosure, I did not read the entire book. It was too bad. I read about half after skipping to sections that I hoped would be interesting. This book has many problems which go beyond the content. The writing style is amateurish with an overuse of quotation marks, contradictions and hyperbole. Almost every scientific term and point of discovery is placed in quotes as if the entirety of human knowledge is in question. The authors will quote from a source only to paraphrase it in the next paragraph with their slant which changes the meaning of the original source. They make tortured claims collusion and suppression followed by brags of great accomplishments in debates, presentations and tv appearances. As far as conspiracy theories go, this book is just awful. One of their proposed theories is a tired rehash of secret world governments run by templar and masons. All of their alien artifacts and ruined cities are based on evidence from pictures taken in the 1970's which were clearly debunked on later missions. In cruel irony, they show newer pictures which have been blurred in an attempt to twist what they show. Some of their claims are too large to be remotely believable and directly contradicted by experience. Example being massive structures on the moon, so large that amateur telescopes would see it, but they can't because it's invisible. There are good conspiracy theories surrounding NASA and the exploration of the solar system. This book is not one of them.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    First off, it absolutely needs an editor. Could have easily been 200 pages less. I found myself skimming a few chapters that were tedious or redundant. Also, some of their claims about the photos - I'm just not seeing it. BUT there are several photographs that make very compelling cases for ancient ruins on Mars and the Moon. And this book demonstrates that NASA clearly has taken billions upon billions of dollars from the taxpayers over the years, and given us half truths, lies, misinformstion a First off, it absolutely needs an editor. Could have easily been 200 pages less. I found myself skimming a few chapters that were tedious or redundant. Also, some of their claims about the photos - I'm just not seeing it. BUT there are several photographs that make very compelling cases for ancient ruins on Mars and the Moon. And this book demonstrates that NASA clearly has taken billions upon billions of dollars from the taxpayers over the years, and given us half truths, lies, misinformstion and doctored data in return. The Masonic piece ended up being far more interesting than expected. I don't know what it all means, but there are some oddly specific connections between the Freemasons and NASA that just can't be ignored. Overall, a very worthwhile read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cody

    It’s interesting...not true, but it’s still interesting hahahaha

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rob V

    It was alright. Pretty slow but that usual for these types.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Guy McElwaine

    This entire book is a paranoid fantasy, expressing nothing other than the authors' bizarre hatred of NASA and utter ignorance of science. Neither of them has any training in science, and neither of them has ever conducted a scientific experiment in his life. On page 224 Richard Hoagland describes himself as a scientist, but this is, in common with most of its context, arrogant nonsense. If you, too, are a NASA-hater, you'll probably enjoy this book and you probably won't care that it is factuall This entire book is a paranoid fantasy, expressing nothing other than the authors' bizarre hatred of NASA and utter ignorance of science. Neither of them has any training in science, and neither of them has ever conducted a scientific experiment in his life. On page 224 Richard Hoagland describes himself as a scientist, but this is, in common with most of its context, arrogant nonsense. If you, too, are a NASA-hater, you'll probably enjoy this book and you probably won't care that it is factually wrong at every turn. If you're a more moderate observer of spaceflight and planetary/lunar science, you can most likely guess that this would be a waste of your money. The corner-flash on the front cover proclaims this second edition to be "REVISED & EXPANDED," but this is an empty claim. None of the many, many errors of fact in the first edition of this wretchedly-edited work have been corrected -- on the contrary, a few have been added in the new introductory passages. The 48 introductory pages are the only part of the edition that is in any sense "expanded" -- the body of the book is exactly as the first edition. Shameful. Disregarding the many, many errors committed by the authors, I have a bone -- a whole skeleton -- to pick with its publisher, Adam Parfrey of Feral House. * In the book's announcement on Amazon, we are told "Authors Richard C. Hoagland and Mike Bara include a new chapter about the discoveries made by ex-Nazi scientist and NASA stalwart Wernher von Braun regarding what he termed 'alternate gravitational solutions.'" There is no such chapter, and that's perhaps a blessing since the mathematics underlying Hoagland's thesis he calls "Von Braun's Secret" is hopelessly, irretrievably, fatally, WRONG. * Also in the announcement, we are told "Buyers of the new edition will be provided a code that will enable them to log on to DarkMission.net to download hundreds of images discussed within the book." Well, I'm a buyer and I've been given no such code. We wuz robbed. It would have been welcome, since the quality of monochrome photo-repro is only marginally better than that of the first edition. That is to say, it has improved from abysmal to unacceptable. * In the publishing world, I think we can all accept that there's a good economic reason for inserting color art as a separate signature, a practice that Parfrey follows here. But why did he find it possible to use inline monochrome illustrations in the Introduction, yet pushed all other art to the end of each chapter, forcing the reader to flip forward at every figure reference? * Errata are inevitable in publishing -- they happen to the best of us. After the first edition, an official list of errata was provided -- 29 items, not too bad for a work of over 500 pages. But second editions are the opportunity to make these good, and in this respect Adam Parfrey is a dismal failure. There are uncorrected errata on pages 131,145,178,215,278,286,312,320,386(2),430 (all using 2nd edition pagination.) This is inexcusable. * There is still no index, in a book with tortuous references to many individuals who are important in the long history of NASA's conspiracy against Richard Hoagland. Indexing would have cost about $2000. Considering the 1st edition sold over 50,000, Parfrey could have afforded it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    B. Wilson

    O.K.. There are conspiracy theories and then there are conspiracy theories, but this one could be the mother of all conspiracy theories. The publisher lists the book as "non-fiction" ...I don't know, I'm really struggling here. There seems to be such a mix of truth and fiction in the book that it's hard to tell where one begins and another leaves off. I love grail mythology and "Dark Mission" sort of fits into the genre, but this is a mythology that seems to absorb every other popular conspiracy O.K.. There are conspiracy theories and then there are conspiracy theories, but this one could be the mother of all conspiracy theories. The publisher lists the book as "non-fiction" ...I don't know, I'm really struggling here. There seems to be such a mix of truth and fiction in the book that it's hard to tell where one begins and another leaves off. I love grail mythology and "Dark Mission" sort of fits into the genre, but this is a mythology that seems to absorb every other popular conspiracy of the twentieth century the way a dry sponge sucks up water. Still, I find myself drawn to certain parts of the story. I certainly understand and sypathize with the "religion of science" view that the author expresses. The religious nature of science today surrounds us in its every discipline. Like the author, I also am convinced that the vast sums NASA spent on missions to Mars had much more to do with the "religion of science", than with science itself. The "religion of science" is rooted in a desperate need to disprove the existance of God and the idea that our universe could have been formed by design. Enough of that though, about the book: good luck if you choose to read it. It is written at a level of detail and scientific / engineering knowledge that goes far beyond the average reader's ability to comprehend. I found, in the end, that it wasn't really worth the effort.

  24. 5 out of 5

    B. Reese

    Hoagland puts forth many very interesting ideas and theories in this book. Unfortunately, his proof does not stray far from either of those and a pinch of circumstantial evidence or conspiracy theory. I enjoyed reading the book, and it did convince me, briefly, that NASA had covered up the habitability of Mars and alien presence in the solar system. Unfortunately, I later found out that Hoadgland used pseudoscience to bolster his claim. The ideas in this book would have made an epic sci-fi story Hoagland puts forth many very interesting ideas and theories in this book. Unfortunately, his proof does not stray far from either of those and a pinch of circumstantial evidence or conspiracy theory. I enjoyed reading the book, and it did convince me, briefly, that NASA had covered up the habitability of Mars and alien presence in the solar system. Unfortunately, I later found out that Hoadgland used pseudoscience to bolster his claim. The ideas in this book would have made an epic sci-fi story, and I guess you could say it already did make an epic story and it was called "2001: A Space Odyssey". Really, this book belongs in science fiction, and I would encourage Hoagland to try his hand at writing fiction, because he's already halfway there. Maybe take some writing classes on how to write characters and fiction just so he doesn't release anymore "research" books. Again, this was enjoyable in ways, but so full of error as to be useless for anything but entertainment purposes. 2.5 stars. If it were a solid fiction book, 4 stars. As a research book, -2 stars.

  25. 4 out of 5

    T

    I think the guy has some points and I emphasize "some". I would give it 2 stars for the effort put in the research, though it appears clearer and clearer towards the end of the book that such research is biased, and one star for entertainment. I think he'd have been better to write a fiction novel. The truth is that no one has evidence enough to suggest that there are extraterrestrial biologic entities though I am sure there is life out there (assuming that there are at least 10,000 earth like p I think the guy has some points and I emphasize "some". I would give it 2 stars for the effort put in the research, though it appears clearer and clearer towards the end of the book that such research is biased, and one star for entertainment. I think he'd have been better to write a fiction novel. The truth is that no one has evidence enough to suggest that there are extraterrestrial biologic entities though I am sure there is life out there (assuming that there are at least 10,000 earth like planets in the Milky Way) but it would be a long stretch to assume that such living entities are in touch with us or that they built some complex buildings on the Moon or Mars as Hoagland suggests. The end of the book is a true pain to read as it is repetitive and really stretched in a biased way. I would not recommend this book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    I read this as a favor to a friend who gave me the book. Frankly, I found it ridiculous. The artifacts on Mars and the moon I find rather unbelievable,but it's the part where he tries to tie in the Kennedy assassination where he really lost me. He doesn't even attempt to explain why Oswald would be involved in a conspiracy involving alien ruins on the moon, which might have at least upped the entertainment factor. Instead there was an overabundance of shifty math and pseudoscience. The book was I read this as a favor to a friend who gave me the book. Frankly, I found it ridiculous. The artifacts on Mars and the moon I find rather unbelievable,but it's the part where he tries to tie in the Kennedy assassination where he really lost me. He doesn't even attempt to explain why Oswald would be involved in a conspiracy involving alien ruins on the moon, which might have at least upped the entertainment factor. Instead there was an overabundance of shifty math and pseudoscience. The book was too dull to be entertaining and too nonsensical to be taken seriously. I do enjoy seeing the pictures of the moon and Mars, so those were cool.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michael Roop

    This book is something special. In that wow kind of way or the kid on the short bus drooling on the window. Some of the theories in this book are far fetched. FAR FETCHED. I'll give it to Hoagland though, he was able to make a good supportive case for them. Other of the theories and actual for real history's in this book were amazing. The public and government communication channels the shuttle has and it's reason. The what can only be called alien contact cover ups...really, really savage. This This book is something special. In that wow kind of way or the kid on the short bus drooling on the window. Some of the theories in this book are far fetched. FAR FETCHED. I'll give it to Hoagland though, he was able to make a good supportive case for them. Other of the theories and actual for real history's in this book were amazing. The public and government communication channels the shuttle has and it's reason. The what can only be called alien contact cover ups...really, really savage. This one isn't for everyone, but if you've got an open mind or are at least curious. It's for you.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tom Kenis

    If anything this book is an ode to the human brain's impressive ability to impose structure where there is only static and chaos. We are somehow very adept at pointing out amazing coincidences even if these are thrown up by a near infinity of random occurrences. It's literally how living beings survive. As for the book's central thesis; Nasa's cover-up of alien artifacts on the Moon and Mars and its connection to the Egyptian pantheon.... Mmm, I dunno. Then again, it's not a question of whether If anything this book is an ode to the human brain's impressive ability to impose structure where there is only static and chaos. We are somehow very adept at pointing out amazing coincidences even if these are thrown up by a near infinity of random occurrences. It's literally how living beings survive. As for the book's central thesis; Nasa's cover-up of alien artifacts on the Moon and Mars and its connection to the Egyptian pantheon.... Mmm, I dunno. Then again, it's not a question of whether you're paranoid or not, it's are you paranoid enough? Or is it?

  29. 5 out of 5

    Roger

    As someone who grew up in the shadow of the space program in Cape Canaveral, this book was bittersweet. I'm glad to live in a country that still allows writers to express divergent opinions (like those in this book), but I'm disappointed that, after reading this book, it's hard to see the American space program in the same light. Although I do not agree with all of the authors' conclusions, I can agree with their primary claim that NASA is not always forthcoming with the truth and that it fails As someone who grew up in the shadow of the space program in Cape Canaveral, this book was bittersweet. I'm glad to live in a country that still allows writers to express divergent opinions (like those in this book), but I'm disappointed that, after reading this book, it's hard to see the American space program in the same light. Although I do not agree with all of the authors' conclusions, I can agree with their primary claim that NASA is not always forthcoming with the truth and that it fails to truly operate as a wholly civilian science program for the public interest.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dji

    It's a report on the discrepancies in NASA's public posture and the possible cover-up of Moon and Mars information that needs to be investigated. I learned that I find conspiracy books much more interesting than fiction. Fiction creates situations and characters to tell a story. Non-fiction tells true stories. Conspiracy fiction tells a story and offers it as truth by connection to selected real facts. It's a report on the discrepancies in NASA's public posture and the possible cover-up of Moon and Mars information that needs to be investigated. I learned that I find conspiracy books much more interesting than fiction. Fiction creates situations and characters to tell a story. Non-fiction tells true stories. Conspiracy fiction tells a story and offers it as truth by connection to selected real facts.

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