counter create hit The Fourteenth Day: JFK and the Aftermath of the Cuban Missile Crisis: The Secret White House Tapes - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Fourteenth Day: JFK and the Aftermath of the Cuban Missile Crisis: The Secret White House Tapes

Availability: Ready to download

On October 28, 1962, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev agreed to remove nuclear missiles from Cuba. Popular history has marked that day as the end of the Cuban Missile Crisis, a seminal moment in American history. As President Kennedy s secretly recorded White House tapes now reveal, the reality was not so simple. Nuclear missiles were still in Cuba, as were nuclear bombers On October 28, 1962, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev agreed to remove nuclear missiles from Cuba. Popular history has marked that day as the end of the Cuban Missile Crisis, a seminal moment in American history. As President Kennedy s secretly recorded White House tapes now reveal, the reality was not so simple. Nuclear missiles were still in Cuba, as were nuclear bombers, short-range missiles, and thousands of Soviet troops. From October 29, Kennedy had to walk a very fine line push hard enough to get as much nuclear weaponry out of Cuba as possible, yet avoid forcing the volatile Khrushchev into a combative stance. On the domestic front, an election loomed and the press was bristling at White House news management. Using new material from the tapes, historian David G. Coleman puts readers in the Oval Office during one of the most highly charged, and in the end most highly regarded, moments in American history.


Compare
Ads Banner

On October 28, 1962, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev agreed to remove nuclear missiles from Cuba. Popular history has marked that day as the end of the Cuban Missile Crisis, a seminal moment in American history. As President Kennedy s secretly recorded White House tapes now reveal, the reality was not so simple. Nuclear missiles were still in Cuba, as were nuclear bombers On October 28, 1962, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev agreed to remove nuclear missiles from Cuba. Popular history has marked that day as the end of the Cuban Missile Crisis, a seminal moment in American history. As President Kennedy s secretly recorded White House tapes now reveal, the reality was not so simple. Nuclear missiles were still in Cuba, as were nuclear bombers, short-range missiles, and thousands of Soviet troops. From October 29, Kennedy had to walk a very fine line push hard enough to get as much nuclear weaponry out of Cuba as possible, yet avoid forcing the volatile Khrushchev into a combative stance. On the domestic front, an election loomed and the press was bristling at White House news management. Using new material from the tapes, historian David G. Coleman puts readers in the Oval Office during one of the most highly charged, and in the end most highly regarded, moments in American history.

30 review for The Fourteenth Day: JFK and the Aftermath of the Cuban Missile Crisis: The Secret White House Tapes

  1. 5 out of 5

    Robert Melnyk

    Interesting book about the Cuban Missile Crisis. Much of what was in the book I already knew, but there was a lot about what went on in the weeks and months after the crisis ended that I did not know as much about.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    An informative and insightful look at how the aftermath of the Cuban Missile Crisis impacted Kennedy administration policies and U.S.-Soviet relations.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Not bad and informative...but dry, dry, dry! Like reading a text book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sean O'Hara

    Most histories of the Cuban Missile Crisis end with Khrushchev agreeing to withdraw the missiles, then gloss over aftermath. The book looks at the diplomatic wrangling that was necessary to actually ensure the missiles were gone. Unfortunately, this requires so much backfilling that the author might as well have written a history of the Crisis that just spends a little extra time on the denouement.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Don LaFountaine

    This was a pretty good book detailing the aftermath of the Cuban Missile Crisis from the Kennedy Administration point of view. Though the book is titles "The Fourteenth Day", it covers the immediate 3+ months after Khrushchev agreed to pull the missiles out of Cuba. Starting with the October 29th, the author discusses a number of issues that faced the administration and the American people. Detailed in the book are the discussions that were had about verifying that the missiles would be removed. This was a pretty good book detailing the aftermath of the Cuban Missile Crisis from the Kennedy Administration point of view. Though the book is titles "The Fourteenth Day", it covers the immediate 3+ months after Khrushchev agreed to pull the missiles out of Cuba. Starting with the October 29th, the author discusses a number of issues that faced the administration and the American people. Detailed in the book are the discussions that were had about verifying that the missiles would be removed. There was not a lot of trust between the United States and the USSR, not to mention that Castro did not want to lose what he saw were "his" new atomic weapons. To that end, he did want want any US planes over Cuban airspace,and threatened to shoot down any planes that flew over. Adding to this was politics. The Republicans who used Cuba as a political attack line held their tongues during the crisis, but were now anxious to attack the administration as being too soft on Communism. Then there was the military leaders who were often at odds with the President about how to proceed with making sure the missiles were removed. Some of the military wanted to plan for an invasion, though Khrushchev was insisting that a no invasion policy towards Cuba be part of the agreement for the missile withdrawal. Interpretation of the terms comes into play as to what is considered "offensive" weapons. All of this played out before the American people through the press, who were very upset at the administration for not providing what it felt was all the information about the crisis and the current events surrounding Cuba. In turn, the Kennedy Administration were not pleased that some reporters had printed classified information in the papers from various leaks inside the government. The author covers all these topics in this book. He does seem to bounce around a little bit from topic to topic, but it's not to tough to follow. This is a pretty good book, and if given the chance, I would have rated it 3 1/2 stars. I think people who like history, who like drama, and those that are fascinated by politics will enjoy this book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Socraticgadfly

    What happened after the Cuban Missile Crisis was allegedly over? David Coleman, using recently released Kennedy White House tapes, talks about issues that started with the 14th day after he first informed the US public of Soviet missiles in Cuba. That includes verifying the Soviets were removing stuff, trying to nail down agreement with them on just what constituted "offensive weapons" and more. Meanwhile, Coleman reminds us (sorry, "Camelot" mythologists) that Kennedy's approval rating, while sti What happened after the Cuban Missile Crisis was allegedly over? David Coleman, using recently released Kennedy White House tapes, talks about issues that started with the 14th day after he first informed the US public of Soviet missiles in Cuba. That includes verifying the Soviets were removing stuff, trying to nail down agreement with them on just what constituted "offensive weapons" and more. Meanwhile, Coleman reminds us (sorry, "Camelot" mythologists) that Kennedy's approval rating, while still well above 50 percent, had dived 15 percent or so from the start of 1962 to the "crisis." So, image burnishing, wanting to keep looking tough yet cool, and more, went into the Kennedy White House trying to manage news, etc. This is probably a 3.5 star .... not a 3 star. It's not a 4 star, though, mainly because it's too light. That said, for an easy historical read, it's not bad.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Philip

    Most everyone has heard something of the 13 days in October 1962. But the Fourteenth day was the day Kennedy realized he needed to verify that the Soviets were actually removing missiles (and other weapons) from Cuba. This turned out to include very big risks also. Recently released/analyzed Kennedy recordings help fill in the story. Khrushchev worried about Castro's erratic behavior particularly his orders to "shoot down surveillance planes". The Soviets would defend Cuba but not risk war with t Most everyone has heard something of the 13 days in October 1962. But the Fourteenth day was the day Kennedy realized he needed to verify that the Soviets were actually removing missiles (and other weapons) from Cuba. This turned out to include very big risks also. Recently released/analyzed Kennedy recordings help fill in the story. Khrushchev worried about Castro's erratic behavior particularly his orders to "shoot down surveillance planes". The Soviets would defend Cuba but not risk war with the U.S. Kennedy had been worried most about Berlin up until the Cuban crisis, but now Cuba had become the "Berlin" of the U.S. sphere. Kennedy said, "the most important flash point [Berlin] had been neutralized".

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Coleman's argument - that the way in which JFK used the Cuban Missile Crisis to define his presidency was as important as the way in which he dealt with the crisis itself - is a compelling in one. It is a good reminder that in the direct aftermath the interpretation was up for grabs and that the narrative we accept as "the truth" was contested at the time. The treatment of the relationship between the Kennedys and the press was especially interesting to me, as was the willingness of the Administ Coleman's argument - that the way in which JFK used the Cuban Missile Crisis to define his presidency was as important as the way in which he dealt with the crisis itself - is a compelling in one. It is a good reminder that in the direct aftermath the interpretation was up for grabs and that the narrative we accept as "the truth" was contested at the time. The treatment of the relationship between the Kennedys and the press was especially interesting to me, as was the willingness of the Administration to sanction what was, at best, questionable surveillance. For a book that is based on the White House tapes I wish there had been a bit more of the contemporary voices than those of the author, but understand that interpretation of raw material is ultimately important.

  9. 4 out of 5

    S A

    The cover and description are quite misleading, especially compared to other books that are actually based on the Whitehouse tapes. This books has about 2 total pages of transcript and the rest could have been condensed in to a really good college research paper - not a 200+ page hardback book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gregory

    Very intriguing but could have been condensed. Lost drive to finish toward the middle. Too slowly paced.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jim Cullison

    A solidly written, surprisingly informative history of the Kennedy Administration during a pivotal moment in U.S. history. Brief and well-supported, it is a quick read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Peter N.

    not much really new here

  13. 5 out of 5

    Someguyfromcrowd

    A short and effective read. Not too much else to say- I'd definitely recommend it to anyone interested in the time period.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Hughlett

    Very enlightening. I like the use of the recordings, and declassified Soviet documents. Highly recommend for any Kennedy buffs.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Zach King

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tim

  17. 4 out of 5

    Strikers44sbcglobal.net

  18. 4 out of 5

    Louie

  19. 5 out of 5

    J. Bryce

  20. 4 out of 5

    Brenna Emily

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Barnett

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ruchama

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  24. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Myers

  25. 5 out of 5

    Danny L

  26. 5 out of 5

    Richard

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ronald Wheatley

  28. 5 out of 5

    Noelle

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lise M. Caron

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.