counter create hit The Art of the Steal: How to Protect Yourself and Your Business from Fraud, America's #1 Crime - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Art of the Steal: How to Protect Yourself and Your Business from Fraud, America's #1 Crime

Availability: Ready to download

The world--famous former con artist and bestselling author of Catch Me if You Can now reveals the mind--boggling tricks of the scam trade--with advice that has made him one of America's most sought--after fraud--prevention experts. "I had as much knowledge as any man alive concerning the mechanics of forgery, check swindling, counterfeiting, and other similar crimes. Ever s The world--famous former con artist and bestselling author of Catch Me if You Can now reveals the mind--boggling tricks of the scam trade--with advice that has made him one of America's most sought--after fraud--prevention experts. "I had as much knowledge as any man alive concerning the mechanics of forgery, check swindling, counterfeiting, and other similar crimes. Ever since I'd been released from prison, I'd often felt that if I directed this knowledge into the right channels, I could help people a great deal. Every time I went to the store and wrote a check, I would see two or three mistakes made on the part of the clerk or cashier, mistakes that a flimflam artist would take advantage of. . . . In a certain sense, I'm still a con artist. I'm just putting down a positive con these days, as opposed to the negative con I used in the past. I've merely redirected the talents I've always possessed. I've applied the same relentless attention to working on stopping fraud that I once applied to perpetuating fraud." In Catch Me if You Can, Frank W. Abagnale recounted his youthful career as a master imposter and forger. In The Art of the Steal, Abagnale tells the remarkable story of how he parlayed his knowledge of cons and scams into a successful career as a consultant on preventing financial foul play--while showing you how to identify and outsmart perpetrators of fraud. Technology may have made it easier to track down criminals, but cyberspace has spawned a skyrocketing number of ways to commit crime--much of it untraceable. Businesses are estimated to lose an unprecedented $400 billion a year from fraud of one sort or another. If we were able to do away with fraud for just two years, we'd erase the national debt and pay Social Security for the next one hundred years. However, Abagnale has discovered that punishment for committing fraud, much less recovery of stolen funds, seldom happens: Once you're a victim, you won't get your money back. Prevention is the best form of protection. Drawn from his twenty-five years of experience as an ingenious con artist (whose check scams alone mounted to more than $2 million in stolen funds), Abagnale's The Art of the Steal provides eye-opening stories of true scams, with tips on how they can be prevented. Abagnale takes you deep inside the world and mind of the con artist, showing you just how he pulled off his scams and what you can do to avoid becoming the next victim. You'll hear the stories of notorious swindles, like the mustard squirter trick and the "rock in the box" ploy, and meet the criminals like the famous Vickers Gang who perpetrated them. You'll find out why crooks wash checks and iron credit cards and why a thief brings glue with him to the ATM. And finally, you'll learn how to recognize a bogus check or a counterfeit bill, and why you shouldn't write your grocery list on a deposit slip. A revealing look inside the predatory criminal mind from a former master of the con, The Art of the Steal is the ultimate defense against even the craftiest crook. From the Hardcover edition.


Compare
Ads Banner

The world--famous former con artist and bestselling author of Catch Me if You Can now reveals the mind--boggling tricks of the scam trade--with advice that has made him one of America's most sought--after fraud--prevention experts. "I had as much knowledge as any man alive concerning the mechanics of forgery, check swindling, counterfeiting, and other similar crimes. Ever s The world--famous former con artist and bestselling author of Catch Me if You Can now reveals the mind--boggling tricks of the scam trade--with advice that has made him one of America's most sought--after fraud--prevention experts. "I had as much knowledge as any man alive concerning the mechanics of forgery, check swindling, counterfeiting, and other similar crimes. Ever since I'd been released from prison, I'd often felt that if I directed this knowledge into the right channels, I could help people a great deal. Every time I went to the store and wrote a check, I would see two or three mistakes made on the part of the clerk or cashier, mistakes that a flimflam artist would take advantage of. . . . In a certain sense, I'm still a con artist. I'm just putting down a positive con these days, as opposed to the negative con I used in the past. I've merely redirected the talents I've always possessed. I've applied the same relentless attention to working on stopping fraud that I once applied to perpetuating fraud." In Catch Me if You Can, Frank W. Abagnale recounted his youthful career as a master imposter and forger. In The Art of the Steal, Abagnale tells the remarkable story of how he parlayed his knowledge of cons and scams into a successful career as a consultant on preventing financial foul play--while showing you how to identify and outsmart perpetrators of fraud. Technology may have made it easier to track down criminals, but cyberspace has spawned a skyrocketing number of ways to commit crime--much of it untraceable. Businesses are estimated to lose an unprecedented $400 billion a year from fraud of one sort or another. If we were able to do away with fraud for just two years, we'd erase the national debt and pay Social Security for the next one hundred years. However, Abagnale has discovered that punishment for committing fraud, much less recovery of stolen funds, seldom happens: Once you're a victim, you won't get your money back. Prevention is the best form of protection. Drawn from his twenty-five years of experience as an ingenious con artist (whose check scams alone mounted to more than $2 million in stolen funds), Abagnale's The Art of the Steal provides eye-opening stories of true scams, with tips on how they can be prevented. Abagnale takes you deep inside the world and mind of the con artist, showing you just how he pulled off his scams and what you can do to avoid becoming the next victim. You'll hear the stories of notorious swindles, like the mustard squirter trick and the "rock in the box" ploy, and meet the criminals like the famous Vickers Gang who perpetrated them. You'll find out why crooks wash checks and iron credit cards and why a thief brings glue with him to the ATM. And finally, you'll learn how to recognize a bogus check or a counterfeit bill, and why you shouldn't write your grocery list on a deposit slip. A revealing look inside the predatory criminal mind from a former master of the con, The Art of the Steal is the ultimate defense against even the craftiest crook. From the Hardcover edition.

30 review for The Art of the Steal: How to Protect Yourself and Your Business from Fraud, America's #1 Crime

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    This would have been better to read 10 years ago. Today, a lot of it is only interesting for historical value - what he noticed, what should have changed, & what actually has. Many of the scams are too well known, but it's still a good refresher. If nothing else, the fact that so many are still so possible & popular should be a good warning. He read the book well & it was interesting to get some personal takes of his history. It sounds as if he's made a successful career out of being a security c This would have been better to read 10 years ago. Today, a lot of it is only interesting for historical value - what he noticed, what should have changed, & what actually has. Many of the scams are too well known, but it's still a good refresher. If nothing else, the fact that so many are still so possible & popular should be a good warning. He read the book well & it was interesting to get some personal takes of his history. It sounds as if he's made a successful career out of being a security consultant even if he wasn't all that great in the computer field. He thinks like a crook, knows the chances they'll take, & what effort they'll go to. If nothing else, much of the content is helpful in a general sense. A lot of scams haven't changed in centuries, they've just moved to different technologies. For instance, the Spanish Prisoner is now known as the Nigerian Email scam. He also did a great job of showing just how little information it takes to steal an identity & which ones can be used best for leverage. The sad thing is that in the 15 years since this book was written, few of the holes have been plugged. The biggest one is our social security number. It's ridiculous how important it is yet how many have access to it. The credit agencies exacerbate identity theft, too. Normal computer users may well get something out of his warnings on them, but I do it for a living. I was disappointed that he didn't point out the biggest flaw in our email system - anyone can send an email as anyone else & that is often used to scam people. (view spoiler)[Don't believe me? Setup a POP client such as Outlook Express or Thunderbird. Notice that there is a field for signing into your email server & another for 'From:' or 'sender'. They don't have to be the same. So [email protected] can send an email as [email protected] &/or [email protected], if he feels like it & many do. (hide spoiler)] So you get an email from a familiar name, open it, click on a link or attachment & wind up in the trick bag. Numerous methods for securing email have been tried, but none have become popular. I did learn a few things & it certainly wasn't a waste of time. This book was highly relevant in its time, but that was over a decade ago & I've had a lot of this shoved in my face for most of that time even if I am only tangentially involved in this aspect of security.

  2. 4 out of 5

    j

    The one thing I did not expect is that this book would be funny, but it totally is. I "read" the audiobook, and when the narrator deadpanned that the title of one chapter is "Forgery: Hours of Fun!" I actually snorted, causing everyone else on the train to turn around and stare. I suspect that many of the criticisms of this book will be based on its timeliness; for example, many people don't use checks at all nowadays, and thus an entire chapter on check fraud may not interest them that much. Bu The one thing I did not expect is that this book would be funny, but it totally is. I "read" the audiobook, and when the narrator deadpanned that the title of one chapter is "Forgery: Hours of Fun!" I actually snorted, causing everyone else on the train to turn around and stare. I suspect that many of the criticisms of this book will be based on its timeliness; for example, many people don't use checks at all nowadays, and thus an entire chapter on check fraud may not interest them that much. But even though I may not find check fraud all that relevant for myself, I still find the information pretty fascinating, just not something I would use on a day-to-day basis. The only thing I think I could do without is the occasional moralizing; Abagnale loooves to tell us that the reason there's more fraud today is because people are greedier and their families don't imbue them with the same sense of morality as previous generations. I'm not sure that's true, or that there's any real research to back that up; it comes across as very "When *I* was your age" + "get off my lawn, you damn kids." The good news is that these segments tend to be few and far between. I would definitely recommend this book; it's a good, amusing, informative read.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kit Pang

    The vast knowledge and scam tricks revealed by Frank Abagnale is scary! This book was written 13 years ago and I cannot imagine how destructive fraud and scam can be today... Very interesting book even though a few of the scams revealed might not be as relevant today as they were 10-15 years ago.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Spencer

    This is a much better book than Catch Me if You Can. It simply presents the information clearly and includes some interesting stories along the way. I wish Mr. Abagnale had written the other book instead of his co-writer.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Zach

    Frank Abagnale is best known for being portrayed by Leonardo Dicaprio in Catch Me If You Can, the true story of how he defrauded millions of dollars while impersonating airline pilots, doctors, and lawyers, all before the age of 21. Abagnale is a conman's conman, a true master of manipulation and exploitation. Luckily for the public, after serving his time in prison in three countries, Abagnale went straight, and has worked as a security consultant for law enforcement and private firms for the l Frank Abagnale is best known for being portrayed by Leonardo Dicaprio in Catch Me If You Can, the true story of how he defrauded millions of dollars while impersonating airline pilots, doctors, and lawyers, all before the age of 21. Abagnale is a conman's conman, a true master of manipulation and exploitation. Luckily for the public, after serving his time in prison in three countries, Abagnale went straight, and has worked as a security consultant for law enforcement and private firms for the last few decades. This book is his attempt to educate laymen about various cons and how to avoid getting taken in by them. The best part of this book is the explanation of all the creative ways that people have invented to defraud one another. My favorite was the guy who registered an 847 number (like a 900 number but less recognizable) for $35 a minute, then would go through the yellow pages, leaving messages with businesses for them to call him back at his 847 number. He made over a million dollars with this simple scam, and never got caught or indicted. But most of the scams are far less imaginative and mostly have to do with getting ahold of someone's checkbook or altering a check they wrote. The US is the only western country that still relies on checks for business, and check fraud dwarfs all other forms. The chapter on embezzlement was also fascinating, if for no other reason than that most embezzlers run their schemes for years without anyone suspecting a thing. White-collar crime is incredibly easy to commit, and isn't punished at near the same level as other crimes (e.g. a bank robbery, which nets a paltry $5,000 on average, gets you more time in jail than stealing $1M from your employer). Much of the book is rather dry, consisting of common-sense advice to avoid these scams. Most of it boils down to: don't reveal personal information about yourself, and only do business with reputable people you know if you plan to pay with check or card. Even then, review your statements every month to make sure you won't be held liable if someone skimmed your card number. Abagnale is an old-school con artist, so it's no surprise that digital payment and the internet in particular leave such a bad taste in his mouth. He's badly out of his depth in his chapters addressing these topics, and it hurts the overall quality of the book. To be fair to him, he was writing at a time when online fraud was much more common, when automated fraud detection on the part of credit companies was in its infancy. But when he makes indefensible statements to the effect that, as the number of online transactions grows it will become harder for credit agencies to spot fraud (the opposite is true), he reveals his fundamental ignorance on the topic. Overall The Art of the Steal is a quick and entertaining read, written in a straightforward and engaging style. I wouldn't recommend it as a personal security manual, but for someone interested in white collar crime and con artists in general, it's a fun read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Shelley

    Great book. Now I'm totally paranoid!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Vic Eyles

    Interesting but it hasn't aged well.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Delphi Michaels

    “The Art of the Steal” is a near terrifying insight into how to recognize and avoid cons and scams. Or, as even the author says, pull them off. He knows some people will use this book as a DIY con game manual. It’s that good. I’m now debating listening to his third book “Stealing Your Life,” as I’m sure it’s bound to frighten me more. But also educate me. I now know there are certain steps I need to take on behalf of my mom and I for protection because this kind of crime is rampant and only grow “The Art of the Steal” is a near terrifying insight into how to recognize and avoid cons and scams. Or, as even the author says, pull them off. He knows some people will use this book as a DIY con game manual. It’s that good. I’m now debating listening to his third book “Stealing Your Life,” as I’m sure it’s bound to frighten me more. But also educate me. I now know there are certain steps I need to take on behalf of my mom and I for protection because this kind of crime is rampant and only growing.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Pip

    It's super, super dated! Especially the bits about internet fraud, and the youth of today and our moral decline. But I love reading about all the ingenious scams people have thought up, which made this book definitely worth it for me.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bill Conrad

    I liked the movie Catch Me If You Can and I read Frank’s Frank Abagnale’s first book of the same title. The intent of this book was to get inside the head of a con artist/thief with the intent of showing you how to prevent crime from happening in your own life. For me, the best part was more on Frank Abagnale’s background. There were some great insights into what he did and what state criminal justice was like at the time. Overall, the book gave some great insight into the sophisticated mind of I liked the movie Catch Me If You Can and I read Frank’s Frank Abagnale’s first book of the same title. The intent of this book was to get inside the head of a con artist/thief with the intent of showing you how to prevent crime from happening in your own life. For me, the best part was more on Frank Abagnale’s background. There were some great insights into what he did and what state criminal justice was like at the time. Overall, the book gave some great insight into the sophisticated mind of a criminal. It reminded me of the book: Social Engineering by Kevin Mitnick. The main take away is that people can be greedy and gullible. Criminals take advantage of this. I recommend reading this book, but I think it is time for: The Art of the Steal 2.0. The information in the book is dated with regards to technology and many criminals in different countries using the Internet for scams. It would be nice to read Franks thoughts on topics such as Facebook.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Murphy

    I read this in one day (because I couldn't stop). For people who aren't familiar with Frank Abagnale, the first chapter is essentially his life story (as told in the film _Catch Me If You Can_ with DiCaprio and Tom Hanks). But every chapter after that discusses different types of scams that people might face: from bad checks, to credit card fraud, to counterfeiting- this book not only gives anecdotes about what scammers have done, but it also gives specific steps that WE can take in order to avo I read this in one day (because I couldn't stop). For people who aren't familiar with Frank Abagnale, the first chapter is essentially his life story (as told in the film _Catch Me If You Can_ with DiCaprio and Tom Hanks). But every chapter after that discusses different types of scams that people might face: from bad checks, to credit card fraud, to counterfeiting- this book not only gives anecdotes about what scammers have done, but it also gives specific steps that WE can take in order to avoid being scammed.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Julier

    August 2018. I listened to about half of this book. I enjoy Frank Abagnale's narration of his own book-he is quite a character. But the book was published almost 17 years ago, so it is out of date since technology has advanced so much. I decided not to finish it for that reason. It would be good background material for a fiction writer who needed to incorporate timely technology for around 2000.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Judi Rogers

    This book, and Mr Abagnale's first one have great information to protect your identity. Even though this book is 18 years old, the things in here will help you to protect your identity. Identity theft becomes bigger every year, and we all need to be concerned Thank you Mr Abagnale for writing these books,and letting yourself be caught!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia

    Some of the information is out of date, which happens quickly now. All of his suggestions are still good though. Protect your information at all times is the best suggestion in the world. I am sure he would have a few things to say about Facebook and the idea of voting online now too.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kristjan Velbri

    Wholly US-centric and largely outdated, though an interesting look into how things used to be. Very little information on how to protect one's business from fraudsters, which is a let-down given the title.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Russ Baxley

    Great book and very informative. It's a little dated nowadays and I'd love to see him come out with another.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Vagabond of Letters, DLitt

    ***1/2 Outdated but hilarious.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Henry

    This book's good for you to get know about forgery, scam and identify thefts.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Henrik Riskær

    Extremely well written book, although a bit confusing and unrelatable as a european, who's literally never touched a check before. Worth a read!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Saeed Al-Dhanhani

    this book is great , have many terms , open my eyes , and made me careful in taking care of my identity and financials. i recommend this book to every living individual.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Published only in 2013, this book reveals old fraud techniques and new ones, and how to protect yourself. Well worth the read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    It functions more as a sequel to "Catch Me if you Can" than a practical guide to fraud protection. The book is from the early 2000's so a lot of the preventive measures are outdated. Still, it's an entertaining read full of some creative cons and worth the read in that regard.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Arun Radhakrishnan

    Each of the following statements represents a possible avenue for an identity thief. I receive several offers of pre-approved credit every week. (5 points) I do not shred the pre-approved credit offers I receive (cross-cut shredder preferred) before putting them in the trash. (5 points) I carry my Social Security card in my wallet. (10 points) I use a computer and do not have up-to-date anti-virus, anti-spyware, and firewall protection. (10 points) I do not believe someone would break into my house Each of the following statements represents a possible avenue for an identity thief. I receive several offers of pre-approved credit every week. (5 points) I do not shred the pre-approved credit offers I receive (cross-cut shredder preferred) before putting them in the trash. (5 points) I carry my Social Security card in my wallet. (10 points) I use a computer and do not have up-to-date anti-virus, anti-spyware, and firewall protection. (10 points) I do not believe someone would break into my house to steal my personal information. (10 points) I have not ordered a copy of my credit reports for at least 2 years. (20 points) I use an unlocked, open box at work or at my home to drop off my outgoing mail. (10 points) I do not have a P.O. Box or a locked, secured mailbox. (5 points) I carry my military ID in my wallet at all times. (It may display my SSN.) (10 points) I do not shred my banking and credit information, using a cross-cut “confetti” shredder, when I throw it in the trash. (10 points) I throw away old credit and debit cards without shredding or cutting them up. (5 points) I use an ATM machine and do not examine it for signs of tampering. (5 points) I provide my Social Security number (SSN) whenever asked, without asking why it is needed and how it will be safeguarded. (10 points) Add 5 points if you provide it orally without checking to see who might be listening nearby. I respond to unsolicited email messages that appear to be from my bank or credit card company. (10 points) I leave my purse or wallet in my car. (10 points) I have my driver's license number and/or SSN printed on my personal checks. (10 points) I carry my Medicare card in my wallet at all times. (It displays my SSN.) (10 points) I do not believe that people would root around in my trash looking for credit or financial information or for documents containing my SSN. (10 points) I do not verify that all financial (credit card, debit card, checking) statements are accurate monthly. (10 points) Understanding Your Score: 100 + points - Recent surveys* indicate that 8-9 million people are victims of ID theft each year. You are at high risk. We recommend you purchase a cross-cut paper shredder, become more security-aware in document handling, and start to question why people need your personal data. 50-99 points - Your odds of being victimized are about average. 0-49 points - Congratulations. You have a high "IQ."

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    This is the second book by Frank Abagnale I have read, behind the more well-known Catch Me If You Can, which was turned into the Leonardo DiCaprio movie. This book is his attempt to educate the people of the world on how they are likely to be defrauded and swindled by people much like himself in his youth He starts out with the very personal story of a woman who has had their identity stolen by someone who has gone on to make her life a living hell by running up, and then ruining her credit ratin This is the second book by Frank Abagnale I have read, behind the more well-known Catch Me If You Can, which was turned into the Leonardo DiCaprio movie. This book is his attempt to educate the people of the world on how they are likely to be defrauded and swindled by people much like himself in his youth He starts out with the very personal story of a woman who has had their identity stolen by someone who has gone on to make her life a living hell by running up, and then ruining her credit rating. He will go through a wide history of the last hundred years, before returning to the story of this woman at the end, in his discussion of identity theft, which he believes is the crime of the future. While he does bring in his own experiences, both as a conman and as a consultant who now assists crime agencies and corporations in improving and evaluating their security measures, most of the book is devoted to a litany of anecdotes and examples of the range of cons and frauds which are perpetrated on the largely-unwary and uncomprehending public. I must confess that there is a certain amount of disingenuousness in a former conman essentially lecturing his fellow conmen on their misdeeds, and one must read the book with a grain of salt. Near the beginning he recounts how - after being released from jail - he struggled to find steady work, and seemed to be stymied at every turn when someone found out about his past. One might read this as a 'poor me' rhetoric. This is in stark contrast to his commentary later in the book against people hiring criminals, and doing background checks on any and all employees. Although the book was published in 2002, and therefore predates many of the technological advances which have taken place in terms of the internet, his commentary on the possibilities and dangers of the future are fair warning for any who would care to listen. It is less autobiographical than Catch Me If You Can, but there is an undeniable flavour of Frank throughout the book. It is one thing to see people suffering at the hands of criminals on the news, but to understand the ins and outs of the mindset of criminals certainly brings things into a new light. A very interesting read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Peachy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. What a ride! I’m shocked and appalled at the incidence of thievery and deception out there, and it is utterly amazing how easily it can all take place. Frank Abagnale is the author of The Art of the Steal, and you may remember him as the person Catch Me If You Can was based upon. What else should an expert conman do after turning straight? Why, provide information on how to catch guys like him of course. Clearly, Abagnale is a very crafty and intelligent man for all of the shenanigans that he wa What a ride! I’m shocked and appalled at the incidence of thievery and deception out there, and it is utterly amazing how easily it can all take place. Frank Abagnale is the author of The Art of the Steal, and you may remember him as the person Catch Me If You Can was based upon. What else should an expert conman do after turning straight? Why, provide information on how to catch guys like him of course. Clearly, Abagnale is a very crafty and intelligent man for all of the shenanigans that he was able to pull off in his past, and now, marketing himself and his abilities after the fact. Between his books and his lectures, he most certainly must be comfortable. He has created this valuable collection of warnings teaching how to minimize your vulnerability and risk of being taken advantage of, and only briefly goes over his past deceit. That information can all be obtained in one of his other books, so I was happy with just short outlines. I chose to listen to an audio book for this one and I’m really glad I did, as there are short sections that you can easily leave and come back to. Also, the narrator has great timing and a calm way about him when reading, which makes it relaxing, even though the content might have your stomach in a knot. It’s ghastly and terrorizing to think of the lives that have been lost to medications and airplane parts that are being counterfeited, or the identity theft that can take place from a simple obituary. Although I’m sure this will help many people in their attempts to protect themselves, I shudder to think how many crooks are polishing up on their skills with this information. www.booksnakereviews.blogspot.com

  26. 4 out of 5

    Craig Dube

    Having just finished Catch Me If You Can, the autobiography of Frank Abagnale's early life as a con man, I decided to move immediately onto The Art of The Steal. However unlike his first book, the autobiographical elements of this book are short-lived as he quickly takes you from being released from jail after only serving 3 years in a 12 year sentence to becoming an expert consultant on fraud to business and government alike. The majority of this book then goes on to explain many different type Having just finished Catch Me If You Can, the autobiography of Frank Abagnale's early life as a con man, I decided to move immediately onto The Art of The Steal. However unlike his first book, the autobiographical elements of this book are short-lived as he quickly takes you from being released from jail after only serving 3 years in a 12 year sentence to becoming an expert consultant on fraud to business and government alike. The majority of this book then goes on to explain many different types of fraud, how the fraud gets perpetrated, and what you can do to protect yourself. Although I'd like to think of myself as vigilant against such things, it is certainly eye-opening to hear of the wide variety of cons and fraud that are practiced every day. From counterfeiting to credit card fraud to street cons and identity theft, it seems that at every opportunity there are crooks and thieves looking to deceive and make off with your money (and more). This book does a good job going into specific details about how these cons are carried out, as well as the tricks and methods they use to forge documents and falsify identities. With each description of the con or fraud comes some good practical ideas on what you can do to lessen your chances of being a victim. The author is clear to point out that no system is 100% safe from fraud and that new techniques are being developed every day. The book certainly tries to instill a level of distrust to all parties you may need to deal with in any sort of financial transaction. This book was written in 2002, so the section on Internet fraud and some of the technology he mention does seem slightly dated. But nonetheless, it still makes for a fascinating listen or read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Quincy

    I enjoyed most of this book; lots of interesting stuff. My only complaints follow. The opening story about identity theft is pretty melodramatic--he returns to it at the end. Also at the end the author drifts into anti-internet paranoia. He recommends never buying anything online, and he writes that the one time he bought something online his card number was stolen. At some point the cost of hyper-security is so high that it outweighs the cost of the fraud you are trying to avoid. After all, if I enjoyed most of this book; lots of interesting stuff. My only complaints follow. The opening story about identity theft is pretty melodramatic--he returns to it at the end. Also at the end the author drifts into anti-internet paranoia. He recommends never buying anything online, and he writes that the one time he bought something online his card number was stolen. At some point the cost of hyper-security is so high that it outweighs the cost of the fraud you are trying to avoid. After all, if you report the fraudulent purchase to your credit card company right away, you don't have to pay it and your card is replaced for free.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alvea S.

    Not something to be passionate about, but it does help cultivate a sense of caution in a tech-savvy era when fraud no longer requires the artistic gait of a con-man, but is possible with the swipe of a card and a few taps on the phone. (How timely. I've been receiving offers of pre-approved credit cards and being asked personal information over the phone.) Always, always be cautious of whatever information you give out because it's no longer just your money they can steal, but your entire identit Not something to be passionate about, but it does help cultivate a sense of caution in a tech-savvy era when fraud no longer requires the artistic gait of a con-man, but is possible with the swipe of a card and a few taps on the phone. (How timely. I've been receiving offers of pre-approved credit cards and being asked personal information over the phone.) Always, always be cautious of whatever information you give out because it's no longer just your money they can steal, but your entire identity. They can give you detestable credit rating and notorious criminal status; in short, you may never get your life back.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gábor

    This book proves two proverbs: "it takes a thief to catch a thief" and "ex criminal makes the best policeman". Mr. Abagnale figured out fairly early in life, that helping others prevent crime, instead of committing it, also offers a good living. He sounds like the man to hire when you want to prevent check/paper based fraud, and also seems to know everything about various cons. One might wonder about his thought on computer crime (although this might possibly be attributed to the book showing it This book proves two proverbs: "it takes a thief to catch a thief" and "ex criminal makes the best policeman". Mr. Abagnale figured out fairly early in life, that helping others prevent crime, instead of committing it, also offers a good living. He sounds like the man to hire when you want to prevent check/paper based fraud, and also seems to know everything about various cons. One might wonder about his thought on computer crime (although this might possibly be attributed to the book showing its age).

  30. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Joy

    Preachy, and to a large degree not applicable to many individuals, even many individuals in business. It's not that advice he gives isn't good. It was very good--when he was writing the book. But even just a few years after the book was published, it appears dated and inaccurate, just due to the rapidly changing nature of security and fraud. Regardless, even if the situation were static, many small business owners will be better off trusting to their bank's fraud prevention departments than impl Preachy, and to a large degree not applicable to many individuals, even many individuals in business. It's not that advice he gives isn't good. It was very good--when he was writing the book. But even just a few years after the book was published, it appears dated and inaccurate, just due to the rapidly changing nature of security and fraud. Regardless, even if the situation were static, many small business owners will be better off trusting to their bank's fraud prevention departments than implementing the expensive suggestions here.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.