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A Roger Sheringham mysteryIn a typical English country house, a murder is committed. The wealthy Victor Stanworth, who'd been playing host to a party of friends, is found dead in the library. At first it appears to be suicide, for the room was undoubtedly locked. But could there be more to the case? As one of the guests at Layton Court, gentleman sleuth Roger Sheringham be A Roger Sheringham mysteryIn a typical English country house, a murder is committed. The wealthy Victor Stanworth, who'd been playing host to a party of friends, is found dead in the library. At first it appears to be suicide, for the room was undoubtedly locked. But could there be more to the case? As one of the guests at Layton Court, gentleman sleuth Roger Sheringham begins to investigate. Many come under suspicion, but how could anyone have killed the man and gotten out of the room, leaving it all locked behind?


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A Roger Sheringham mysteryIn a typical English country house, a murder is committed. The wealthy Victor Stanworth, who'd been playing host to a party of friends, is found dead in the library. At first it appears to be suicide, for the room was undoubtedly locked. But could there be more to the case? As one of the guests at Layton Court, gentleman sleuth Roger Sheringham be A Roger Sheringham mysteryIn a typical English country house, a murder is committed. The wealthy Victor Stanworth, who'd been playing host to a party of friends, is found dead in the library. At first it appears to be suicide, for the room was undoubtedly locked. But could there be more to the case? As one of the guests at Layton Court, gentleman sleuth Roger Sheringham begins to investigate. Many come under suspicion, but how could anyone have killed the man and gotten out of the room, leaving it all locked behind?

30 review for The Layton Court Mystery

  1. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    This novel, published anonymously in 1925, introduces amateur detective Roger Sheringham. Anthony Berkeley was, at this time, embarking on a long career as a crime author, which would see him become one of the founding members of the Detection Club; whose history has recently been written in the excellent, “The Golden Age of Murder,” by Martin Edwards. This novel begins with the classic house party setting. Author Roger Sheringham and his friend Alexander Grierson have been invited to stay with This novel, published anonymously in 1925, introduces amateur detective Roger Sheringham. Anthony Berkeley was, at this time, embarking on a long career as a crime author, which would see him become one of the founding members of the Detection Club; whose history has recently been written in the excellent, “The Golden Age of Murder,” by Martin Edwards. This novel begins with the classic house party setting. Author Roger Sheringham and his friend Alexander Grierson have been invited to stay with the wealthy businessman Mr Victor Stanworth. Neither knew their host well, but he appears to enjoy entertaining and to be jolly and outgoing. Other guests include his sister in law, Lady Cynthia Stanworth, Mrs Shannon and her daughter, Barbara and Mrs Plant. Other characters include ex-prize fighter, now butler, Graves and Mr Stanworth’s private secretary, Major Jefferson. During the house party, Alexander becomes engaged to Barbara, although when the book begins, she suddenly calls off the engagement without giving a reason. The surprise of Alexander and Barbara’s on-off engagement is overshadowed by the discovery of Mr Stanworth’s body, found dead in the library. It is assumed that he committed suicide, but Roger Sheringham is not convinced and tries to involve Alexander as a rather unwilling Watson. In this novel, it is clear that Anthony Berkeley wants to get away with the idea of the detective hero being infallible and so he tries hard to make Roger Sheringham a more human investigator – he makes rash judgements, his deductions are often incorrect and he makes mistakes. However, eventually he does uncover the truth. This may not be a classic Golden Age mystery – it stumbles a little too much for that and has a more unconventional ending. However, it is a really interesting novel of the genre and I applaud Berkeley for trying to do something a little different at the time. I think that Sheringham had a lot to offer as an amateur detective and I will certainly look forward to reading on and discovering where the author led him.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kavita

    It appears to be a typical suicide - or is it a locked room mystery? When Roger Sheringham was invited to spend some time at Layton Court by Victor Stanworth, whom he barely knew, little did he know he was going to stumble upon a first class murder mystery. Stanworth is found dead in his library with a bullet hole in the centre of his forehead and a gun in his hand. Everyone believes he committed suicide, and there is a note to go along with it. But our wannabe detective is suspicious. He stretch It appears to be a typical suicide - or is it a locked room mystery? When Roger Sheringham was invited to spend some time at Layton Court by Victor Stanworth, whom he barely knew, little did he know he was going to stumble upon a first class murder mystery. Stanworth is found dead in his library with a bullet hole in the centre of his forehead and a gun in his hand. Everyone believes he committed suicide, and there is a note to go along with it. But our wannabe detective is suspicious. He stretches things to try and make it appear to be a murder, just because he wants it to be. Assisting him is Alexander Grierson, an old time friend of Roger and a newly engaged man. Will he concentrate on the murder or would he prefer to spend time with his fiancee? The twists come hard and fast, but I swear I never saw the solution coming. I should have, but I didn't. Full marks for that! The entire story is written in a humorous vein with Roger forever berating Alexander for not behaving sufficiently like Watson. The cast of characters are typical for an English country house mystery (I believe that should be genre of its own!). This is Berkeley's first book and Sheringham's first case. Both are a winner!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Orinoco Womble (tidy bag and all)

    Granted, this was Berkeley's first novel, and granted that summer's heat has just arrived, making me lethargic and uninterested in much. However, I think it fair to warn you, Gentle Reader--this book is full to the brim of tell-not-show. The entire thing is related second- and third-hand. It's far too talky, and I sussed the killer in the first chapter or so. It's been called "witty", but after the first few chapters the style began to pall on me. Style can't carry a novel, much less a mystery. Granted, this was Berkeley's first novel, and granted that summer's heat has just arrived, making me lethargic and uninterested in much. However, I think it fair to warn you, Gentle Reader--this book is full to the brim of tell-not-show. The entire thing is related second- and third-hand. It's far too talky, and I sussed the killer in the first chapter or so. It's been called "witty", but after the first few chapters the style began to pall on me. Style can't carry a novel, much less a mystery. The characters besides Sheringham and Grierson are background scribbles; aside from a few meals, and one or two conversations with Mrs Plant, the other guests are never seen after detection begins. Lady Stanworth withdraws to her room and is never seen again until the very end--in her own house? The business with the lattice windows had already been done, as well, by at least Christie. Berkely is not Christie; indeed not. And we won't even mention him in the same conversation with Miss Sayers! I understand Berkeley has several novels to his credit. I hope they got better as he gained experience. I found this one confusing and dull at the same time. I also understand this one was published anonymously. Can't blame him for not wanting to take credit for it. It's not awful, it's just...pas terrible.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    This is a mystery where the reader is kept informed of all of the evidence found by the "gentleman sleuth". I still wasn't quite able to solve the murder completely, but did figure out a few things before he did. But my favorite lines in the book were: "Shall I hack some ham for you, or do you feel like a boiled egg? You do? It's a curious feeling, isn't it?" That made me laugh out loud!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    British author Anthony Berkeley's detective Roger Sheringham -- annoying author, bon vivant, exceedingly supercilious, eminently curious, loquacious to a fault -- has been nearly forgotten. What a dreadful shame! Sheringham deserves at least to be as well known as Dorothy Sayers' Lord Peter Wimsey and Ngaio Marsh's Lord Roderick Alleyn. In The Layton Court Mystery, which first introduced Roger Sherinham to the world, Roger is invited to a house party in the country at the request of his cousin, A British author Anthony Berkeley's detective Roger Sheringham -- annoying author, bon vivant, exceedingly supercilious, eminently curious, loquacious to a fault -- has been nearly forgotten. What a dreadful shame! Sheringham deserves at least to be as well known as Dorothy Sayers' Lord Peter Wimsey and Ngaio Marsh's Lord Roderick Alleyn. In The Layton Court Mystery, which first introduced Roger Sherinham to the world, Roger is invited to a house party in the country at the request of his cousin, Alec, who will also be a guest there. The host, Victor Stanworth, lavishly entertains his guests and then, in the wee hours of the morning, locks himself in the library and shoots himself -- or at least that's what the police believe. Roger almost immediately begins to doubt the official view. Enlisting his cousin to be his Watson, Roger casts himself as Sherlock Holmes and begins investigating the matter himself. Drily humorous, Roger relies on imagination as much as on evidence to formulate this theories. Needless to say, Roger makes a few wrong turns before finally discovering who killed Victor Stanworth. In the meantime, he uncovers quite a few secrets that Stanworth's guests and staff would rathr have not come to light. Berkeley never takes Roger too seriously, and you'll find yourself chuckling at Roger's boundless supply of theories -- and conceit. Like a terrier with a rat, Roger won't quit until he finds out exactly what happened at Layton Court. Warning: The Layton Court Mystery first appeared in 1925, and the novel bears the crude sensibilities of that era, including one instance of anti-Semitism and a general condescending air toward the working classes. If you can understand that Berkeley was a creature of his era, you will still be able to thoroughly enjoy this novel.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Irfan Nurhadi

    Sedikit merasa de-ja-vu ketika membaca novel ini. Sampai derajat tertentu ada kesamaan dengan Trent's Last Case, tapi dalam hal lain ceritanya cukup original. Satu hal yang ingin saya katakan pada sang tokoh detektif, Roger Serringham : "How can you not see it, you old blighter!" Well, there's that. Full review menyusul.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Diane Hernandez

    This book was extremely slow and I was able to guess who did it less than 25% in. While Berkeley is considered a "English golden age of mysteries" author like Agatha Christie and Dorothy Sayers, this book was a disappointment to me.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gabriele

    È davvero un capolavoro del genere, considerando anche che questo è il romanzo d'esordio di uno dei padri fondadori del giallo classico inglese. La trama è ben congegnata, con mille indizi che nel corso dei capitoli portano a nuove scoperte (spesso fallaci, in quanto la peculiarità di Roger Sheringham, investigatore del romanzo, è la sua fallibilità e umanità). Ma per me il punto di forza del romanzo è la prosa: gradevole e scorrevole, tanto che non si sente il peso delle pagine che si leggono. È davvero un capolavoro del genere, considerando anche che questo è il romanzo d'esordio di uno dei padri fondadori del giallo classico inglese. La trama è ben congegnata, con mille indizi che nel corso dei capitoli portano a nuove scoperte (spesso fallaci, in quanto la peculiarità di Roger Sheringham, investigatore del romanzo, è la sua fallibilità e umanità). Ma per me il punto di forza del romanzo è la prosa: gradevole e scorrevole, tanto che non si sente il peso delle pagine che si leggono. Quindi 5 stelle meritate pienamente.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Oakes

    Victor Stanworth has rented Layton Court for the summer, and has a few friends down as his guests. But all is not well...Stanworth turns up dead in his library, with doors and windows all locked from the inside. He is found with a bullethole in the center of his forehead, along with a suicide note. Sounds easy, right? But for one of the guests, Roger Sheringham, all is not as it seems, and he begins an investigation. The main character, Roger Sheringham, comes off as a bit of an idiot, latching Victor Stanworth has rented Layton Court for the summer, and has a few friends down as his guests. But all is not well...Stanworth turns up dead in his library, with doors and windows all locked from the inside. He is found with a bullethole in the center of his forehead, along with a suicide note. Sounds easy, right? But for one of the guests, Roger Sheringham, all is not as it seems, and he begins an investigation. The main character, Roger Sheringham, comes off as a bit of an idiot, latching onto theory after theory as to how Stanworth met his end, and I must say, I really didn't know how he was going to get serious long enough to figure the whole thing out. However, the mystery actually turns out to be okay, although it is a bit meandering at times as Sheringham picks up then discards theory after theory. I'd recommend it to people who are fans of these Golden-Age mysteries and people who enjoy the occasional English country house murder. I do plan to continue the series, if that's any kind of recommendation at all. There is one place where the author's language could be construed as a bit racist, but I suppose the reader must keep in mind that this was originally published in 1925. Overall, not a bad read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mariano Hortal

    Con el auge actual de la novela negra se está dando el fenómeno de olvidarse de las novelas de detectives de toda la vida, excepto, afortunadamente, en el caso de Agatha Christie. Pues bien, la última lectura ha sido "El Misterio de Layton Court" del escritor británico Anthony Berkeley, este señor formó parte de la gran edad dorada de la novela de detectives de principios del siglo XX más concretamente perteneció al "London Detection Club" que fundaron la propia Christie, Chesterton o Dorothy Sa Con el auge actual de la novela negra se está dando el fenómeno de olvidarse de las novelas de detectives de toda la vida, excepto, afortunadamente, en el caso de Agatha Christie. Pues bien, la última lectura ha sido "El Misterio de Layton Court" del escritor británico Anthony Berkeley, este señor formó parte de la gran edad dorada de la novela de detectives de principios del siglo XX más concretamente perteneció al "London Detection Club" que fundaron la propia Christie, Chesterton o Dorothy Sayers por citar los más sobresalientes. La novela se caracteriza por seguir las reglas de una típica novela de detectives, aquí, el detective es un escritor llamado Roger Sheringham y se caracteriza por su locuacidad prácticamente enfermiza y su memoria fotográfica, es muy humano, divertido y hasta se equivoca. La novela es un ejemplo de honestidad, no oculta nada, y puedes seguir perfectamente los razonamientos en una trama que, por otra parte, está perfectamente hilada, y desde luego no tiene los "deus ex machina" de muchas novelas actuales. Una excelente manera de introducirse en estas novelas, maravillosas por otra parte. Esperemos que puedan seguir publicando más del autor. Y ya de paso... a descubrir a Chesterton y Sayers... imagino que a Christie ya la conocéis!!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Martina Sartor

    In corso d'opera ho scoperto che avevo già letto questo libro nell'edizione Giallo Mondadori, dove aveva il titolo "Delitto a porte chiuse". Questa seconda lettura mi è risultata più gradita della prima. Ho capito meglio certi meccanismi del delitto e il tipo di 'camera chiusa' proposta. Anche il finale l'ho apprezzato di più. Tenuto conto che il libro è del '25, quando Dame Agatha aveva appena iniziato a scrivere i suoi gialli, il finale proposto da Berkeley mantiene una sua originalità e anzi po In corso d'opera ho scoperto che avevo già letto questo libro nell'edizione Giallo Mondadori, dove aveva il titolo "Delitto a porte chiuse". Questa seconda lettura mi è risultata più gradita della prima. Ho capito meglio certi meccanismi del delitto e il tipo di 'camera chiusa' proposta. Anche il finale l'ho apprezzato di più. Tenuto conto che il libro è del '25, quando Dame Agatha aveva appena iniziato a scrivere i suoi gialli, il finale proposto da Berkeley mantiene una sua originalità e anzi potrebbe esser stato lui a suggerire alla Dame un certo tipo di colpevole che compare in diversi libri della Christie. Fra l'altro fu proprio Berkeley il vero fondatore del Detection Club.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

    Now that I've finished it, I must admit The Layton Court Mystery is well-told and well-clued, with many charms provided by the interplay between Anthony Sheringham and his sidekick, Alec. But it's far too long and drawn out, and would have worked much better as a novella, or even a short story. Berkeley undeniably, however, has the requisite qualities for a good detective story writer, and I'm looking forward to his later works (this was his first venture).

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ludditus

    Since it's a novel with plenty of dialogue, most of the time people are saying something rather than doing some other thing. When someone speaks or tells things, he (or on occasions she) says, but also remarks, replies, retorts, asks, returns, confesses, observes, agrees, concludes, interrupts, pursues, points out, responds, corrects, repeats, answers, admits, adds, comments, murmurs, persists, explains, continues, prompts, exclaims. While doing that, the action is performed tolerantly, nastily, Since it's a novel with plenty of dialogue, most of the time people are saying something rather than doing some other thing. When someone speaks or tells things, he (or on occasions she) says, but also remarks, replies, retorts, asks, returns, confesses, observes, agrees, concludes, interrupts, pursues, points out, responds, corrects, repeats, answers, admits, adds, comments, murmurs, persists, explains, continues, prompts, exclaims. While doing that, the action is performed tolerantly, nastily, thoughtfully, wisely, pleasantly, disappointedly, gravely, awkwardly, excitedly, dryly, reluctantly, weightily, argumentatively, sharply, incredulously, admiringly, magnanimously, apologetically, reprovingly, enthusiastically, briskly, feelingly, largely, vaguely, plaintively, mournfully, kindly, promptly, firmly, mildly, happily, carefully, suspiciously, approvingly, primly, warmly, meticulously, quickly, passionately, abruptly, stiffly, easily, conversationally, tonelessly, suddenly, carelessly, guardedly, shortly, uncompromisingly, heatedly, tragically, wistfully, disapprovingly, emphatically, disgustedly, laconically, seriously, cheerfully, wearily, modestly, severely, lamely, genuinely, gruffly, reflectively, grimly, gloomily, unhappily, uneasily, regretfully, sarcastically, simply, blankly, airily, sympathetically, eagerly, helplessly, noncommittally, obstinately, patiently, earnestly, indignantly, softly, slowly, impressively, casually, curiously, or limply. Clearly not a novel written by Stephen King! For a novel written in 1925 and the first Roger Sheringham case, it's actually a good one, once the reader doesn't expect from Berkeley the writing standards of Somerset Maugham's. Plotwise, Berkeley is no Conan Doyle, and even less of Agatha Christie (despite Roger behaving like Poirot at some point: “That’s what makes it all the more extraordinary, because I really am very seldom wrong. I say it in all modesty, but the fact is indisputable.”) It can be tedious and almost boring at times, as the human being is supposed to be exceedingly naive and slow-minded, and it also makes one wonder if they ever manage to categorize a murder as a murder, not a suicide, back then, but overall the story has a couple of quirks that cannot be guessed too early. I was a bit shocked by this bit though: “It was not until the necessity for consuming a large plateful of prunes and tapioca pudding, the two things besides Jews that he detested most in the world, …”. Looking forward to other Roger Sheringham cases, to see if he really evolved into a Sherlock Holmes kind of chap, hopefully with a more appropriate Watson…

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth (Miss Eliza)

    *Special Content only on my blog, Strange and Random Happenstance during Golden Summer (May-September 2013) Because of his friend Alec, the author Roger Sheringham has been invited by Victor Stanworth to be a part of his house party at Layton Court. Victor has rented a lovely house for the summer and has surrounded himself with friends. So why do they find Victor locked in his library with an apparently self inflicted gunshot wound to the head and a suicide note? Despite the fact that all the win *Special Content only on my blog, Strange and Random Happenstance during Golden Summer (May-September 2013) Because of his friend Alec, the author Roger Sheringham has been invited by Victor Stanworth to be a part of his house party at Layton Court. Victor has rented a lovely house for the summer and has surrounded himself with friends. So why do they find Victor locked in his library with an apparently self inflicted gunshot wound to the head and a suicide note? Despite the fact that all the windows and doors are locked from the inside, Roger thinks that perhaps it was murder and it would be fun to play at being a sleuth. He has to have a Watson to his Holmes, someone who will be a dumb sounding board and willing to be berated constantly. Alec grudgingly takes up this mantle and they set about solving a crime that they aren't sure even happened. At one time or another they suspect all of their fellow guests, and even a mysterious "Prince." With the clock running against them till the inquest and their imminent departure from Layton Court, can an amateur sleuth and his reluctant Watson solve it in time? When I sat down here at my computer and hammered out the details to my Golden Summer, I added Anthony Berkeley for the reason I have had a copy of The Poisoned Chocolates Case sitting on my bookshelf for... well, I don't know how long it's actually been there, but a dash long time. Yet when I got to reading up on Berkeley I found out that The Poisoned Chocolates Case was not the first Roger Sheringham book as I had thought. Because of Berkeley's propensity for writing under pseudonyms, or in this case, sometimes anonymously, The Poisoned Chocolates Case is either the forth or fifth book with Sheringham... so obviously, I had to start at the beginning and my poor copy of The Poisoned Chocolates Case would be neglected for some while more. My initial impressions of The Layton Court Mystery was that it had more then a few striking similarities with A.A. Milne's The Red House Mystery, which I had just finished and loved. Sadly, where that one had wit and originality, this was just labored and had an angry tone throughout... or maybe it was my rage reading because everything grated on my nerves. I was more then once struck by how this reminded me of an episode of the BBC's Comedy Showcase called "Felix and Murdo." In the episode the hilarious actors Ben Miller and Alexander Armstrong, are Edwardians looking forward to the 1908 Olympics in London, this being aired to spur the fervor for last year's summer Olympics. The thing about the whole episode was that it was trying too hard to be witty and ended coming out crap. That's how I felt about this whole book. It was trying too hard. That and the fact that seeing as both Milne and Berkeley worked for Punch, that there is no way Berkeley didn't realize how similar his book was and I think Milne should have taken him out back, not necessary for a dust up, but maybe to school him in the ways of actually writing a good book. Or perhaps it's crappiness was why it was published anonymously... There is just so much wrong with this book I literally don't know where to start... shall I dissect the horrid characters or the plot... decisions, decisions... ok, let's go with characters, because their stupidity made the plot drag and drag until I could barely stand it anymore. Roger and his "friend" Alec are the two most unlikable people ever. They are mean and snipe at each other constantly. I would say that they quite literally hate each other. I would never treat a friend in the manner they treat each other, a mortal enemy, maybe... but still, it wouldn't be as harsh as these two. Also, they act against character all the time. They say they are not prone to sentimentality, yet the act that Alec commits is the definition of being a sentimental fool and rushing in to save the damsel in distress. But luckily, they aren't sentimental...wtf? Not to mention Roger is a bigoted jackass, and a hypocritical one at that who calls others bigoted! He looks down on the servants, whom having a discussion with "would be as ineffective as to harangue a hippopotamus." Also, his views on women... oh dear me. Women are all crying milksops that need a big strong man to protect them, and with their inferior mental capabilities "there's always the chance that a woman will" give away a clue. Though nothing compares to how Roger's antisemitism comes out. The line was so offensive I can't even bring myself to quote it. Unlike the pervasive racism that is in the work of Dorothy L. Sayers, Berkeley's was like a slap in the face. I literally cannot think why anyone would say something so offensive. Now to the plot... or what I gather you would call a plot. It's really just two guys arguing and then arguing some more and at the end of the day, well... nothing happens at the end. It just sort of stopped. All the plot problems are because of the idiocy of Roger and Alec. Their attempt to solve the "murder" of their host is like a how-to guide on how not to solve a mystery. They look at the scene of the crime and then retreat into the garden and talk things out, repeat ad infinitum. Because obviously they can't be overheard in a garden? Why is this garden so damn secretive? Is it in fact The Secret Garden? NO!?! Well then, anyone with any sense can hear what you're saying. As for your host and resident corpse... you didn't figure out that his circle of friends are all people he is blackmailing till about 150 pages in? Well, I figured it out 10 pages in. Haven't you seen Clue? Ok, no... you wouldn't, but still, it was obvious. Also, why would you discount the fact that the killer was probably among the house guests? Why would you think an outside person was the perpetrator? Ug. But the worst of all, why would you think that a suspect would have the name "Prince?" I mean, the SECOND I read that name I was like, dood, that's an animal, as it turned out to be a bull, I was spot on. In fact, everything about this book was either bang my head against the wall obvious or so offensive that I wished to throttle the author. And here I go... getting ready to read his next book... am I a masochist? Yes, I think I might be, but it's all for you, my gentle reader.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Vivi

    The cow, a large, powerful-looking animal, had indeed quitted its corner and was advancing purposefully in their direction. Its head was swaying curiously from side to side and it was emitting a noise not unlike the hoot of a steamer. ‘My God!’ Alec shouted suddenly. ‘That isn’t a cow; it’s a bull! Run like hell!’ Roger needed no second invitation; he set off at top speed in the wake of the flying Alec. The bull, observing this disappointing procedure, thundered after them. It was an exciting ra The cow, a large, powerful-looking animal, had indeed quitted its corner and was advancing purposefully in their direction. Its head was swaying curiously from side to side and it was emitting a noise not unlike the hoot of a steamer. ‘My God!’ Alec shouted suddenly. ‘That isn’t a cow; it’s a bull! Run like hell!’ Roger needed no second invitation; he set off at top speed in the wake of the flying Alec. The bull, observing this disappointing procedure, thundered after them. It was an exciting race while it lasted. The result, some six seconds later, was as follows: 1. Mr A Grierson. 2. Mr R Sheringham. 3. Bull. Distance between first and second, ten yards; between second and third, one five-barred gate (taken by the second in his stride)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Teddi

    I really wanted to like this - a locked room mystery written in entirely readable language although written very long ago. But nothing seemed to happen- it was all talking and thinking.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Claire Barker

    😏

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rosa María

    Una novela de misterio y asesinato, resuelto por un "detective" nada común. Fácil de leer y te mantiene con la intriga hasta el final.

  19. 5 out of 5

    David

    The mystery solution is stretched a little thin, but it is a fun read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    There one shockingly offensive "joke" in which the protagonist is disappointed when he comes to the breakfast table because the two dishes being served are "the only two things Roger hated more than Jews." This is not the first offensive comment about Jews I've read from this author, but this is most casual and the fact that was intended as humorous is chilling. However - I actually thought this was a pretty good book and pretty good mystery, in terms of the plot and dialog. I didn't exactly see There one shockingly offensive "joke" in which the protagonist is disappointed when he comes to the breakfast table because the two dishes being served are "the only two things Roger hated more than Jews." This is not the first offensive comment about Jews I've read from this author, but this is most casual and the fact that was intended as humorous is chilling. However - I actually thought this was a pretty good book and pretty good mystery, in terms of the plot and dialog. I didn't exactly see the end coming, not that I tried to predict the murderer. Enjoyable and easy read with some good (non-racist) humor here and there.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Roger Sheringham is the guest at Layton Court when the tenant, a rich and hospitable man, commits suicide. But Roger thinks detecting would be fun, and he doesn't believe that a man like that would kill himself. Of course, Sheringham will develop into a more skilled detective, but this is still an enjoyable book if you can put yourself into a sufficiently naive 1929-ish mood. Unfortunately, there's a totally gratuitous slur directed at a particular group that is unacceptable today.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Наташа

    История очень даже Вах! Мне понравилось, особенно концовка и человечный характер Роджера, который строит предположения, ошибается,и в целом очень живой и непосредственный в своих поступках и выводах. Да и интрига в для детективной истории была хороша. Классический, очень приятный и занимательный английский детектив, легко читается, в паре моментов даже заставил меня улыбнуться.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Juan Carlos

    The story was slow, but it gives you all the details about the investigation, so you can try to guess who was the murderer (I was able to!). It's so surprising when the killer identity is revealed by Roger.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Pietro De Palma

    The first novel by A. Berkeley. With a good locked room. A little masterpeace.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    For my full review click on the link below: https://crossexaminingcrime.wordpress... For my full review click on the link below: https://crossexaminingcrime.wordpress...

  26. 4 out of 5

    Laurie

    Full review at https://bedfordbookshelf.com/the-layt... Full review at https://bedfordbookshelf.com/the-layt...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Clarisa Doval

    Summer read, perfect for a train ride.

  28. 5 out of 5

    K.B. Hallman

    Novelist and amateur sleuth Roger frequently isn't right, but his self-assurance and keen eyes and mind make him a joy to follow around.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Antigone Chambers

  30. 5 out of 5

    August

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