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"Definitely a political novel. More than the individual story of a mother watching her sons grow and plunge into real life, Dekada '70 is an indictment of martial law, and here, Lualhati minces no worlds." - Female Forum, November 21, 1983 "Definitely a political novel. More than the individual story of a mother watching her sons grow and plunge into real life, Dekada '70 is an indictment of martial law, and here, Lualhati minces no worlds." - Female Forum, November 21, 1983


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"Definitely a political novel. More than the individual story of a mother watching her sons grow and plunge into real life, Dekada '70 is an indictment of martial law, and here, Lualhati minces no worlds." - Female Forum, November 21, 1983 "Definitely a political novel. More than the individual story of a mother watching her sons grow and plunge into real life, Dekada '70 is an indictment of martial law, and here, Lualhati minces no worlds." - Female Forum, November 21, 1983

30 review for Dekada '70 (Ang Orihinal at Kumpletong Edisyon)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Aj the Ravenous Reader

    While I’m on a classic reading binge, I thought it only fair to include a Filipino classic novel (written in Filipino). [Book:Dekada ‘70] translated in English as “Decade ‘70” is an account of a woman living in a “man’s world” during those difficult years when Martial Law was declared in the Philippines. Narrated by Amanda, a mother of five boys, the novel strongly portrays the struggles of a woman during those times when gender equality wasn’t a well-known concept yet and women were seen as sub While I’m on a classic reading binge, I thought it only fair to include a Filipino classic novel (written in Filipino). [Book:Dekada ‘70] translated in English as “Decade ‘70” is an account of a woman living in a “man’s world” during those difficult years when Martial Law was declared in the Philippines. Narrated by Amanda, a mother of five boys, the novel strongly portrays the struggles of a woman during those times when gender equality wasn’t a well-known concept yet and women were seen as subordinates of men. The story realistically portrays this as Amanda dutifully does her best to meet what the six men at her home, especially her husband, expect of her. It becomes a greater challenge to fulfill a woman’s predefined roles for Amanda due to familial, political and social difficulties at that time but it’s also because of these impediments that Amanda found a way to earn long overdue respect and acknowledgement as a woman. With the strong feminist approach, tragic tone and emotionally intense and heart-wrenching plot, it’s no surprise that the novel won several literary awards. It’s a historically and socially significant novel that I believe requires more attention. The book was also adapted into a movie released in 2002. I’m sure there’d be English subtitles.^^

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jr Bacdayan

    Note: This review was written as a course requirement for my class: History of Women and Feminism in the Philippines. “Dahil sila’y mga babae… at imposible para sa babae na kalabanin ang lalaki. It’s a man’s world.” (Translation: It’s because they are women… and it is impossible for women to oppose men, it’s a man’s world.) These are the words of Julian, a husband, a father, to her wife on why women should not get irritated with him. This is a prime example of a patriarchal man. Contemptible w Note: This review was written as a course requirement for my class: History of Women and Feminism in the Philippines. “Dahil sila’y mga babae… at imposible para sa babae na kalabanin ang lalaki. It’s a man’s world.” (Translation: It’s because they are women… and it is impossible for women to oppose men, it’s a man’s world.) These are the words of Julian, a husband, a father, to her wife on why women should not get irritated with him. This is a prime example of a patriarchal man. Contemptible words, yet somehow, are sadly true. How did his wife, Amanda, respond? She rolled her eyes, but she kept quiet. She discerned that to contest this would be futile. Why? Because she didn’t know any better. She was a woman molded in a society that conformed to this belief. Yes, she existed in a nation were men dominated, but she will learn that she was not in a man’s world. “Maghubad ka na, sabi niya. Ni hindi niya tinanong kung gusto ko nga ba maghubad. Basta ‘maghubad ka na,’ period. Kailangan sakin mismo manggaling ang natitirang pamproteksiyon sa dignidad ko. Puwede bang magpatay muna tayo ng ilaw? Na sinagot niya ng maikli, walang damdaming ‘oh’. No’ng unang gabing ‘yon, ni hindi niya tinanong kund hindi ba ko nasaktan. Basta ng matapos na siya, natulog na siya. Naghilik na siya.” (Translation: Take off your clothes, he said. He didn’t even ask me if I wanted to take it off. He just said ‘take it off’ period. I had to be the one to protect what little dignity I had. I asked ‘Can we turn off the lights? He answered with a short and empty ‘oh’. That first night, he didn’t even ask if it hurt. He just slept when he was done. He snored.) “Kakulangan. Sa loob ng dalawampu’t pitong taon ng pagiging asawa ko’y hindi ako ganap na umunlad bilang tao. Nanganak lang ako’t naging ina at wala na. Tumigil na ‘ko sa pagiging ganon. Nawala na ko pagktapos nyon. Nagsilbing bantay na lang ako sa paghanap at pagkatagpo ni Julian ng katuparan niya bilang tao, sa paglaki ng mga bata’t pagtuklas ng kanilang kakayahan at kahalagahan. Sa proseso nito, walang nag-abalang magtanong kung ano na kaya ang mga kaangkinan ko naman. Ni ako, hindi ko alam kung ano pa ako liban sa asawa’t ina. Madalas ngayon ay hinahanap ko ang sarili ko sa harap ng naging papel ko sa buhay…” (Translation: Emptiness. In the span of twenty-seven years of being a wife I never grew as a person. I gave birth and became a mother then nothing. I stopped there. I was lost after that. I served as a caretaker to Julian as he searched and fulfilled his life’s work, to the growth of my children as they discovered their strengths and importance. In the process, nobody asked me what I have achieved. Even I, I do not know what I am aside from a wife and a mother. Often now, I search for myself in spite of all the roles I have played in life…) “Ibig kong sabihin,ayoko nang maging doormat mo lang. Taga-abot ng tsinelas mo, taga-timpla ng kape mo! Sa kagaganon, nawala tuloy ako, naging walang klaseng tao ko! Habang panahong nanay na lang! Habang panahong asawa mo lang! Pinaghubad pag gusto, ginanon kung kelan mo gusto! Napaiyak na ko… Bakit hindi pag gusto ko?” (Translation: I mean I do not want to be just your doormat. Someone whose role is just to pick up your slippers, someone who’s there just to make your coffee! Being that person, I lost myself, I became nothing! Forever just a mother! Forever just a wife! Stripping when you tell me to, being fucked only when you want to! I started to cry… why not when I want to?) These are the thoughts, the experiences of Amanda, wife of Julian, a mother of 5 boys, a Filipina. This shows the suffering of a typical woman experienced in our country back then and still even in a lot of homes today, she is expected to become a housewife, nothing more. She is boxed, her growth as an individual stunted, she is not given a chance. The ‘70s was not a kind time to the Filipino people, more so to the Filipino women. Lualhati Bautista’s Award-Winning novel about the awakening of a country and the struggles of a mother, a woman is a gut-wrenching eye-opener to anyone who is willing to hear its angry screams, its searing pleas. The parallelism between the two intertwined stories, the mother and the motherland is truly captivating. The two, the woman and the country are subdued, without true freedom. Dominated, manipulated, chained, one by imperialism and a dictator, the other by a husband and a patriarchal culture. At the start both were as ignorant as babes, as silent as mutes about their rights, about what is theirs. Both were taken for granted, taken advantage of. But slowly, steadily, they progressed. The country was awakened, its people flooded the streets, the masses, the students, priests, nuns, militants full of outrage and passion with shouts of revolution against a dictator that violated their rights and mistreated their countrymen, against a neocolonialist power that stole their lands, raped their livelihood and picked their pockets. The woman, the mother, the wife learned to fight back, to answer, to think for herself. She realized her worth as a woman, as a person, through her own simple way of supporting the revolution because of her children. She realized that to protect her children, her family, she must learn to protect her country. The motherland empowered her; in turn the shackled motherland was empowered equally because of her. Their plights are more connected to each other than it seems, the success of one spelled the success of the other. “Pero ang babae, talian man ang katawan o suutan man ng chastity belt, ay may uri ng kalayaang hindi mananakaw ng kahit na sino: ang kalayaan niyang mag-isip.” (Translation: But a woman, you may tie up her body or force her to wear a chastity belt; there is a type of freedom that nobody can take away from her: the freedom to think.) This passage from the novel reminds me of a particular quotation from one the greatest Feminist writers, someone named Virginia Woolf. “Lock up your libraries if you like; but there is no gate, no lock, no bolt that you can set upon the freedom of my mind.” And it is true, women cannot be restricted, as long as their minds are working, nobody can suppress them. But to really utilize it, this is where education comes in. Women need to be educated about their rights, they must learn to identify the shackles of patriarchy and its brother capitalism, reject their biased culture, spit on these concepts that taught them to be submissive, that taught them to keep quiet and told them they were inferior, these controlling concepts that masks itself as religion, tradition, and good-conduct. But before that, they must first think, and realize that they are in-chains. For how can you set free someone who does not consider themselves as slaves? How can you liberate someone who considers oppression as a state of normalcy? You show them their chains, you rip the veil around their eyes, you educate. “Naiisip ko… naiisip ko lang naman… wala sanang magalit sakin pero naiisip ko… na kailangan na nga yata natin ng rebolusyon!” (Translation: I am thinking… I’m just thinking… I wish nobody would get mad at me but I’m beginning to think… that we need a revolution!) Yes, we have revolted and won the battle for our country to some extent, we brought but down the dictator. Still, we still have a lot of work to do in terms of neo-colonialism though we have achieved great strides. Now, the revolution we need is the revolution against patriarchy. We need a revolution against this entity that paralyzes about half of the people not only in this country, but in the world. We need to revolutionize our way of thinking through education into a more egalitarian one. Naiisip ko din… na kailangan na natin ng rebolusyon! I am thinking... that we need a revolution. Gender Emancipation! Equality for all! “Lalakas pa ang tinig ng paghihimagsik, iigting pa ang tapang ng masang Pilipino… hanggang sa makamit ng sambayanan ang tunay at ganap na kalayaan!” (Translation: The shouts of revolution will get louder; the bravery of the Filipino masses will intensify… until the people achieve true and utter freedom!) Our country will never achieve true and utter freedom unless its women are free from the chains of patriarchy. After all, it’s a woman’s world too.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rise

    Walang subersibo dito. Bakit magiging subersibo ang katotohanan? (There's nothing subversive here. Why will the truth be considered subversive?) – Dekada '70 Lualhati Bautista gained notoriety when Dekada '70 came out in 1984, after having shared the grand prize for the Palanca Award for Best Novel one year previous. This novel about a Filipino family drastically affected by forces beyond their control was a national narrative of resistance against the Marcos dictatorship, against its repression of Walang subersibo dito. Bakit magiging subersibo ang katotohanan? (There's nothing subversive here. Why will the truth be considered subversive?) – Dekada '70 Lualhati Bautista gained notoriety when Dekada '70 came out in 1984, after having shared the grand prize for the Palanca Award for Best Novel one year previous. This novel about a Filipino family drastically affected by forces beyond their control was a national narrative of resistance against the Marcos dictatorship, against its repression of individual and societal rights and liberties. The story was told by Amanda Bartolome, wife to a dominating husband, mother to five sons, and – as she learned in the course of the novel – woman of her own mind. We found Amanda contemplating her role beyond her family of men, beyond a traditional patriarchy where a woman is only expected to serve a husband and rear children. This even as her world was being swept by the tides of history. Her strong-willed eldest child, Julian Jr. (Jules), was becoming more and more sympathetic to the ideology of leftist groups even as he increasingly felt alienated to the national government's raw display of totalitarian power. When the President handed down martial law in 1972, civil rights suffered in consequence. Student councils and school papers were closed down; the freedom of the press and the freedom to organize were curtailed; curfews were set; the writ of habeas corpus was suspended. It was only a matter of time before Jules joined the communist insurgency and his mother lost many a nights' sleep over her son's uncertain fate. Higit kailanman ay ngayon ko nadarama ang mga trahedya ng maging ina. Hindi pala natatapos ang hirap at kirot sa pagsisilang ng anak, may mga sakit na libong ulit na mas masakit kaysa mga oras ng panganganak. (Now more than ever I feel the tragedies of being a mother. It appears that my pains and sacrifices did not end with my giving birth to my son. There are pains a thousand more painful than the hours of labor.) What started as a domestic drama suddenly became a politically charged look at the lives of ordinary individuals in repressive regimes. Bautista dramatized the temper of the times using explicit images, language, and scenes. The action of the novel revolved only around a single family and yet she managed to infuse the domestic conflicts among brothers and parents with conviction. The Bartolomes were a nuclear family that could be viewed as a microcosm of a country descending into chaos. We followed Amanda as she began to question her relationship with her husband and internalize the violence threatening her children. From the seventies until the lifting of martial law in 1981, and even beyond that, we were privy to Amanda's increasing awareness of injustices around her, the socioeconomic and political issues hidden from sight, and her emerging political and feminist principles – these two principles becoming inseparable and closely tied together. As the Bartolomes braved the dark shadows of military rule, vigilante killings, and social unrest, the reader was witness to a freak history. There were some wrenching scenes that seared into the mind, yet there were simple moments in the book that were equally hard-hitting in its emotional tenderness. Dekada was squarely in the tradition of José Rizal's 19th century protest novels against Spanish colonialism, the Noli and Fili, because it dared to question and critique the ruling power and its cohorts, and because it presented a forceful synthesis of abuses, corruption, and violence under martial law. No other novel had so lived up to its titular era as perhaps no other could have proposed its own "truthful", and hence "subversive", aesthetic of resistance against a dictatorship regime. The family is the basic unit of society, we are taught and constantly reminded in schools. Bautista had shown that its values are also its pillars and that the seeds of resistance to any unjust authority at any time could very well dwell in a family. Dekada, arguably the defining novel of the period, had set the bar for a martial law novel so high that I shall be reading succeeding Filipino novels on the topic against Bautista's standard. She managed to distill an epoch of madness in those trying times, in that "world of men" that Amanda was starting to reject. For the record, in her record, in the words of her protagonist, the novelist defined the role of the writer in those circumstances: "Manunulat ang nagpe-preserb sa katinuan ng lipunan nya." ("It is the writer who preserves the sanity of her society.") Indeed they do, the very best of them, the authentic ones. They restore it to its senses. They slap it so hard that it may wake from its long sleep. First published in edited form in 1984, Dekada anticipated the 1986 EDSA Revolution that toppled President Marcos from power. In one of its deft ironic touches, it was prescient in detecting a major change in the air: Naiisip ko . . . naiisip ko lang naman . . . wala sanang magalit sa 'kin pero naiisip ko . . . na kailangan na nga yata natin ang rebolusyon! (I was thinking . . .  I was just thinking . . . let no one mind me but I was thinking . . . that maybe it's time we need a revolution!) The writing style of Dekada was considered controversial during its time because some passages in the novel were written in Taglish, a mixture of Tagalog and English words. Language purists must have felt discomfort at the threat to the purity of the Tagalog vernacular and so failed to acknowledge the realist style of Bautista's language. Her writing was also deemed "unpolished" for its straightforward, colloquial dialogue and presentation even if that's how Filipinos talked then and now. The Taglish aspect of the prose is one consideration for the translator should the novel be translated into English. Read as part of the martial law fiction reading project .

  4. 4 out of 5

    Francis Mico

    In one of the darkest period of Philippine history where a dictator had led us and brought the government on corruption era; where political interest mattered more than the public welfare; where freedoms were suppressed; and where communist-led movements for ousting Marcos' administration had emerged; and where women were disregarded in the "men's world", have you ever wondered how a woman sees the society? Portrayed in the Martial Law era, Lualhati Bautista had enveloped me the thoughts most of In one of the darkest period of Philippine history where a dictator had led us and brought the government on corruption era; where political interest mattered more than the public welfare; where freedoms were suppressed; and where communist-led movements for ousting Marcos' administration had emerged; and where women were disregarded in the "men's world", have you ever wondered how a woman sees the society? Portrayed in the Martial Law era, Lualhati Bautista had enveloped me the thoughts most of the women during that era had. In a feminist approach, Bautista had crafted a novel with the finest details Amanda, the protagonist, sees in the society. Amanda as a wife had been portrayed by Bautista as nothing but a mere tool of her husband; voiceless; held to opine; and constricted by her husband's superiority. As a mother, she was portrayed nothing far from the usual caring mother. What was interesting was her role as an individual of the society. First part of the novel she was shown as uninterested and not privy in the political situation that the country have been facing; her world revolves in her family. On the later part of the story her character had matured thanks to Jules, her son, that let her see through the society. Being a member of a communist group, Jules had awakened Amanda to look on the current dictatorship of the government; he had made her skeptic on her belief that what the government do is for the betterment of the people and country itself. The totality of the novel engaged on the political impediments Philippines had suffered during Martial law, family relations and the role of women in society.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jyanna Galamgam

    I chose this book to read for our Tagalog book review in our Filipino subject. I was a bit hesitant on reading this mainly because I'm more comfortable reading English novels....but this book, I swear.. was surprisingly (not just good but) great. I really did enjoy it and understood more about Philippines' history and how the right ones are oppressed, and the women, while they play a GREAT role in the community, is usually treated like a servant. All in all, this book is really great. It captured I chose this book to read for our Tagalog book review in our Filipino subject. I was a bit hesitant on reading this mainly because I'm more comfortable reading English novels....but this book, I swear.. was surprisingly (not just good but) great. I really did enjoy it and understood more about Philippines' history and how the right ones are oppressed, and the women, while they play a GREAT role in the community, is usually treated like a servant. All in all, this book is really great. It captured a lot of things that happen in a common household not just during the '70s but also nowadays. I HIGHLY recommend it to anyone who can understand Tagalog.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jnz

    endless struggle. woman's oppression in the society, dilemma of teenagers trying to prove that they have something to say, tyranny of the fathers at home. girl power... endless struggle. woman's oppression in the society, dilemma of teenagers trying to prove that they have something to say, tyranny of the fathers at home. girl power...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ivy Catherine

    3.5 changed to 4 stars yeah... it deserves that +.5

  8. 4 out of 5

    Violeta

    NO to Martial law! It can make and unmake a family towards communism. Hala Ka!

  9. 4 out of 5

    George Gonzaga Deoso

    An important novel and historical artifact.

  10. 5 out of 5

    May

    I had to read "Dekada '70" back in college as an assignment, but thankfully, it turned out to be a good read...The book, I believe, gives good insights to the perils of martial law...But more importantly, I think the book tells more of a woman's "enlightenment" and journey to "self-empowerment"... On a personal note, I remember lending it to my mom. When she returned it to me, she said the book made her paranoid a couple of hours after having read it. Apparently, she was on duty when went throug I had to read "Dekada '70" back in college as an assignment, but thankfully, it turned out to be a good read...The book, I believe, gives good insights to the perils of martial law...But more importantly, I think the book tells more of a woman's "enlightenment" and journey to "self-empowerment"... On a personal note, I remember lending it to my mom. When she returned it to me, she said the book made her paranoid a couple of hours after having read it. Apparently, she was on duty when went through the book (she was alone, too), and she said she became somewhat scared for her children. You see, "Dekada '70" is also a story of a mother of five young sons (her name is Amanda Bartolome). As a mother, Amanda experienced a lot of gruelling and tumultuous moments involving her sons. Thus, Amanda had to learn how to cope with changes not only within her family but changes in the society they are living in and how it affected her family...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mirvan. Ereon

    I like the simplicity of this book. This is very accessible to any reader. I love the way it is so short and yet full of startling and sometimes unsettling scenes. I learned a lot of how things used to be when Martial Law was implemented. Besides, I do admire this great writers works. L love the succinct way of her storytelling, but the impact it gives are very good.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bea

    It's a great political book. Although I haven't watched the movie yet, the book by itself represents how a Filipino should view his/her country. Dapat mahalin ang bansa hindi lang dahil sa isang militante. It's a great political book. Although I haven't watched the movie yet, the book by itself represents how a Filipino should view his/her country. Dapat mahalin ang bansa hindi lang dahil sa isang militante.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Christina Aguilar

    the only filipino book i ever read. read it a looooong time ago. very graphic. very sad. i remember i had to put it down a few times because i just couldn't handle all the gory details. will find a copy so i can read it again. the only filipino book i ever read. read it a looooong time ago. very graphic. very sad. i remember i had to put it down a few times because i just couldn't handle all the gory details. will find a copy so i can read it again.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    Absolutely amazing book! One of those rare required readings for high school that didn't feel like homework. She captured the era so well that it gives later generations (like me!) a chance to relive it and appreciate the freedom we were born with. Absolutely amazing book! One of those rare required readings for high school that didn't feel like homework. She captured the era so well that it gives later generations (like me!) a chance to relive it and appreciate the freedom we were born with.

  15. 5 out of 5

    M

    eye-opening, historical and heartwarming story of family who lived through the martial law era

  16. 5 out of 5

    cel de Jesus

    a concrete manifestation of Philippine society.. well-written!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rowena

    A mother, a family, and a society struggling to survive a government of hate, corruption and oppression. The story is beautifully told with utmost sincerity without being sentimental.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    got the book because it was an assigned reading back in college and i never regretted putting it in my shelf..for a child who grew up after the dictatorship, this is a good glimpse of the era..

  19. 5 out of 5

    Elyssa

    A feminist view of living in a patriarchal society. This book embarks how women can fight for their right to be a part of the society and not just mere inferiors to men. Really enjoyable read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Ann

    My favorite Local Classic would be this and another book also by the same author called "bata bata paano ka ginawa". My favorite Local Classic would be this and another book also by the same author called "bata bata paano ka ginawa".

  21. 4 out of 5

    Karlo Mikhail

    One of the best Filipino novels. The film is a pale reflection of the book. A must read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael Gerald

    Nah, for me, this novella just didn't appeal to me. This was the only required reading in high school that I did not like a bit. Nah, for me, this novella just didn't appeal to me. This was the only required reading in high school that I did not like a bit.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    will read it first can't comment will read it first can't comment

  24. 5 out of 5

    Peach

    Every Filipino should read this book at least once in their life.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Munting Aklatan

    In the same way many in our country are seeking national democratic freedom, the protagonist Amanda looks for herself outside of being just a wife and a mother, something she was not able to do after being conditioned to be meek, unassuming, and submissive by the simple reason that she is a woman. A reason put forth to her by her husband. By "them." By society. What I love about this book is that you don't have to change any of the details for this to resonate with you. The subjects of sexism, pa In the same way many in our country are seeking national democratic freedom, the protagonist Amanda looks for herself outside of being just a wife and a mother, something she was not able to do after being conditioned to be meek, unassuming, and submissive by the simple reason that she is a woman. A reason put forth to her by her husband. By "them." By society. What I love about this book is that you don't have to change any of the details for this to resonate with you. The subjects of sexism, patriarchy, abuse of government power, corruption, martial law, freedom fighters, and extrajudicial killings are not tales of a distant past. They are, in fact, things we see every day until now. I am so upset that this masterpiece, among many others, are merely glossed over in high school Filipino. I'm beginning to think my former teachers have not read half the literature (excerpts, mind you) they made us read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sofia Reyes

    Got to read this 'cause it was a requirement in our Filipino subject. I even had to make a book review. The thing is, our instructor wanted us to review per chapter cause she's a sadist. Ugh!!! Got to open my eyes with the tyranny or the Marcos's during Martial Law. Not my type of read and more specifically, I have a hard time comprehending deep tagalog/filipino words. Matatalinhagang Salita as what we call it in the Philippines. Got to read this 'cause it was a requirement in our Filipino subject. I even had to make a book review. The thing is, our instructor wanted us to review per chapter cause she's a sadist. Ugh!!! Got to open my eyes with the tyranny or the Marcos's during Martial Law. Not my type of read and more specifically, I have a hard time comprehending deep tagalog/filipino words. Matatalinhagang Salita as what we call it in the Philippines.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Roeve Perez

    If you're a person who was brainwashed into "men are pigs" by toxic feminist and SJWs especially by reading dumb books and dumb videos online, then this book is for you. It's pretty much a book of how evil men are. But if you've seen the hypocrisy and real face of feminism and have seen that they don't actually care about women, then this book is not for you. If you're a person who was brainwashed into "men are pigs" by toxic feminist and SJWs especially by reading dumb books and dumb videos online, then this book is for you. It's pretty much a book of how evil men are. But if you've seen the hypocrisy and real face of feminism and have seen that they don't actually care about women, then this book is not for you.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jhon Christian Rozano

    A novel book containing the oppression of Marcos's regime during martial law. It also includes the way a female stands in society as inferior to men. Feminism brought it all along with the harsh reality of martial law. A novel book containing the oppression of Marcos's regime during martial law. It also includes the way a female stands in society as inferior to men. Feminism brought it all along with the harsh reality of martial law.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mariam Balisacan

    It's a great novel i feel like i'm feminism gender in it though I don't have kids and i'm not a wife i feel the feeling of having a kids like em, jayson, julian and bingo while reading this. And someday I will respect any decision as a wife like Mrs. Amanda to husband Mr. Julian but I will disagree that "This world is a man's world" :P It's a great novel i feel like i'm feminism gender in it though I don't have kids and i'm not a wife i feel the feeling of having a kids like em, jayson, julian and bingo while reading this. And someday I will respect any decision as a wife like Mrs. Amanda to husband Mr. Julian but I will disagree that "This world is a man's world" :P

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dani

    had to read this for filipino class!!!! hehe tanginice mulat na ako

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