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24/6: A Prescription for a Healthier, Happier Life

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"Remember the Sabbath and keep it holy."Sounds nice, but how do we find rest in a 24/7 world? Just as the Hebrews were slaves in Egypt, we have become slaves to technology. Our technological tools allow 24-hour productivity and connectivity, give us more control, and subtlety enslave us to busyness itself. Sabbath is about restraint, about intentionally not doing everythin "Remember the Sabbath and keep it holy."Sounds nice, but how do we find rest in a 24/7 world? Just as the Hebrews were slaves in Egypt, we have become slaves to technology. Our technological tools allow 24-hour productivity and connectivity, give us more control, and subtlety enslave us to busyness itself. Sabbath is about restraint, about intentionally not doing everything all the time just because we can. Setting aside a day of rest helps us reconnect with our Creator and find the peace of God that passes all understanding. The Sabbath is about letting go of the controls one day a week and letting God be God. So how do we do it?In "24/6, " Dr. Matthew Sleeth describes our symptoms, clarifies the signs, diagnoses the illness, and lays out a simple plan for living a healthier, more God-centered life in a digitally-dazed, always-on world. Sleeth shares how his own family was dramatically transformed when it adopted Sabbath practices and helps readers better understand how their own lives can be transformed - physically, emotionally, relationally and spiritually - by adopting the 24/6 lifestyle.


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"Remember the Sabbath and keep it holy."Sounds nice, but how do we find rest in a 24/7 world? Just as the Hebrews were slaves in Egypt, we have become slaves to technology. Our technological tools allow 24-hour productivity and connectivity, give us more control, and subtlety enslave us to busyness itself. Sabbath is about restraint, about intentionally not doing everythin "Remember the Sabbath and keep it holy."Sounds nice, but how do we find rest in a 24/7 world? Just as the Hebrews were slaves in Egypt, we have become slaves to technology. Our technological tools allow 24-hour productivity and connectivity, give us more control, and subtlety enslave us to busyness itself. Sabbath is about restraint, about intentionally not doing everything all the time just because we can. Setting aside a day of rest helps us reconnect with our Creator and find the peace of God that passes all understanding. The Sabbath is about letting go of the controls one day a week and letting God be God. So how do we do it?In "24/6, " Dr. Matthew Sleeth describes our symptoms, clarifies the signs, diagnoses the illness, and lays out a simple plan for living a healthier, more God-centered life in a digitally-dazed, always-on world. Sleeth shares how his own family was dramatically transformed when it adopted Sabbath practices and helps readers better understand how their own lives can be transformed - physically, emotionally, relationally and spiritually - by adopting the 24/6 lifestyle.

30 review for 24/6: A Prescription for a Healthier, Happier Life

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    I first heard about this book from Dr. Sleeth when I met him last year. When he told me that he was writing a book about the Sabbath, I was intrigued and looked forward to seeing what he had to say on the subject. I wasn't disappointed. Over the years the concept of Sabbath rest has become more important to me and this book does nothing but educate and reaffirm why. This isn't a book written for scholars, but it is a book from which scholars could greatly benefit (take a break!). Fun. Easy to r I first heard about this book from Dr. Sleeth when I met him last year. When he told me that he was writing a book about the Sabbath, I was intrigued and looked forward to seeing what he had to say on the subject. I wasn't disappointed. Over the years the concept of Sabbath rest has become more important to me and this book does nothing but educate and reaffirm why. This isn't a book written for scholars, but it is a book from which scholars could greatly benefit (take a break!). Fun. Easy to read. Filled with memorable quotes. This is not a "self-help" book, but rather it is a book about how God has designed His creation to take time to be Holy and rest in Him. This is a greatly neglected subject in church. Protestants are known for their "work ethic" not their "rest ethic." As Dr. Sleeth points out, "24/6 is not about working hard and playing hard. It is about working hard and stopping." Every year I'm at a loss for gifts to buy for Christmas. After finishing this book, things just got easier. This book was provided to me by Blessed Earth in exchange for an unbiased review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Luann

    Sleeth's book is good food for thought, but not much more in my opinion. It's subtitle, A prescription for a healthier, happier life should have been a clue that it was not going to be up my alley. He does include historical and biblical significance for the Sabbath, which is worth the read. He begins each chapter with a medical illustration--something I suppose I should have expected from someone bearing the initials "M.D." at the end of his name, yet as someone not medically-inclined in any wa Sleeth's book is good food for thought, but not much more in my opinion. It's subtitle, A prescription for a healthier, happier life should have been a clue that it was not going to be up my alley. He does include historical and biblical significance for the Sabbath, which is worth the read. He begins each chapter with a medical illustration--something I suppose I should have expected from someone bearing the initials "M.D." at the end of his name, yet as someone not medically-inclined in any way, shape, or form, I did not appreciate them. The book neither convicted me of any lack of personally keeping the Sabbath nor convinced me of his application of it, either. There is legitimacy to the claim that not being on the go (especially career-related) 24/7 can lead to a healthier life. Also that the idea that taking time to enjoy relationships and perhaps a hobby or two brings happiness. Sleeth certainly did not side-step the spiritual aspect. And yet, not so large a mention as to merit placement in the subtitle. And what really is the Sabbath without the One who is Lord over it?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    A good book on a very important and often neglected subject. There were a few parts I found repetitive, but this book should be very helpful for anyone wanting to explore the subject. It isn't very long and I loved the index of scriptures talking about the Sabbath rest in the back very helpful.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    What I liked: I was challenged and encouraged by the overall message of this book, honoring the Sabbath, and enjoyed reading the lengths the author and his family went to do so (e.g. Cooking and cleaning the day before, not shopping or going out to eat that day, not even buying a last minute item needed for school the next day, etc). I especially liked the suggestions they had for families and look forward to using those if I have children. I also enjoyed reading the stories from his practice as What I liked: I was challenged and encouraged by the overall message of this book, honoring the Sabbath, and enjoyed reading the lengths the author and his family went to do so (e.g. Cooking and cleaning the day before, not shopping or going out to eat that day, not even buying a last minute item needed for school the next day, etc). I especially liked the suggestions they had for families and look forward to using those if I have children. I also enjoyed reading the stories from his practice as an ER doctor. It was also a blessing to hear how the Sabbath actually led to the author becoming a Christian. Overall this book challenged me in a good way to put into place several habits and practices to truly honor the Sabbath, which I find myself and many other Christians neglecting on a regular basis, and described the benefits of doing so. What I didn't like: While I enjoyed the ER stories, sometimes the connection between the story and the main point was a stretch or was too vague and not fleshed out enough. Also, when the author retold or referred to a passage or story from the Bible, he often changed the wording to make it more modern, but it ended up coming across as both cheesy and confusing. For example: 'Before the close of Mark's second chapter, Jesus melts an IRS section chief's heart, who then throws a party people are still tweeting about.' (Huh? I have read Mark several times and still had to double check and then found out he was talking about Levi.) Or when describing the scene of Abraham and the three guests: 'Sarah, make some bread. Don't use the flour from that soft grindstone; use the batch Lot sent for your ninetieth. And take the Cabot cheese out of the icebox so that it can warm up.' As a reader, I get both offended and annoyed at writing like this. While I obviously was not alive in Abraham's time, providing some background on the time period and their practices would have been enough to keep me both interested and increase my understanding of the hospitality Abraham was showing and the reality of this scene (which let's be honest the crazy interesting part of this passage isn't that, but that God somehow shows up in these three people (as the Trinity?) and tells Abraham he's going to have a kid with Sarah even though they are super old). Instead the author rewrote the entire scene in a modern, anachronistic way that not only made it cheesy but lessens the story and makes it seem less real. In general I don't like it when authors change the language of the Bible to be more modern or 'relevant' (God is relevant and doesn't need our help to be so/if we don't find Him relevant the problem is with us). When they do so, it seems to show the authors think they need to change a description of a biblical story to fit our culture so we can understand it. I don't need to think of Abraham sacrificing the calf he was going to show in a fair or imagine them celebrating birthdays to understand this passage (especially since I didn't grow up rurally and have never shown animals). What I do need to understand this passage is a sharing of knowledge and teaching about this passage to help me know what this meant to the original readers and in its original context and how it fits into the entire narrative of the Bible that God is continuing today. The author did a nice job of practically describing how to live out that narrative by keeping the Sabbath and used the Scriptures to encourage us on the why and how to do so. I just wish he (and many other Christian authors/bloggers) would do so without retelling the Bible to fit it into our culture when the point of his book seemed to be the opposite, changing our daily lives to fit into the practice and culture of the Sabbath as described in the Bible.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kjersti

    I understand the irony that I had to speed-read this to finish it and the other required reading before Annual Conference. I'm sure it deserves a higher rating, but I was really hoping that the author would eventually devoted more time to specific, creative ways of practicing Sabbath. While the foundation of the material was fascinating and new, and I appreciated the author's personal background, the applications were the same I've heard time and again. That doesn't make them bad. In fact, I am I understand the irony that I had to speed-read this to finish it and the other required reading before Annual Conference. I'm sure it deserves a higher rating, but I was really hoping that the author would eventually devoted more time to specific, creative ways of practicing Sabbath. While the foundation of the material was fascinating and new, and I appreciated the author's personal background, the applications were the same I've heard time and again. That doesn't make them bad. In fact, I am in agreement that Sabbath keeping should be a higher priority in my life. Yet in the end I was left a bit disappointed.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tzippy

    From the Amazon description:"Remember the Sabbath and keep it holy." It’s the only commandment that begins with the word remember...Eeeshk. What an embarrassing mistake. But anyway, it's free on Amazon, and I'm kind of curious, so...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    I really wanted to like this, but it just didn't happen for me. Felt too repetitive. I was looking for less why to practice 24/6 and more how. It offered some, but not enough for my needs.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Justin Tapp

    Dr. Sleeth lives in my hometown; I had heard about him after he spoke at a local church. He was once an overworked ER physician who discovered the Bible when he began taking his own personal sabbaths. There is no legalism in Sleeth's sabbath, no religious rabbit holes; he encourages you to take away the legalism and keep it grounded in Jesus. Sleeth encourages the reader to see how the sabbath reflects the character God. Jesus staked his ministry on the Sabbath when he showed that he works on it Dr. Sleeth lives in my hometown; I had heard about him after he spoke at a local church. He was once an overworked ER physician who discovered the Bible when he began taking his own personal sabbaths. There is no legalism in Sleeth's sabbath, no religious rabbit holes; he encourages you to take away the legalism and keep it grounded in Jesus. Sleeth encourages the reader to see how the sabbath reflects the character God. Jesus staked his ministry on the Sabbath when he showed that he works on it and says he is the meaning of it. Sleeth sees God's intent with creation in the biblical Sabbath rest. Studies have shown that taking one day in seven to rest has significance for our minds and bodies. It helps us let go and recuperate. Get sleep, avoid materialism and the "rat race." Sleeth is encouraging everyone to take a "Stop Day" where you don't work and you do things that you only do on your Sabbath-- like read a particular book. He encourages the reader to do it as a family. This is a simple book, simple idea. I give it four stars.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Terri Milstead

    A friend asked me before I finished if I liked this book and would I recommend it. I told her I liked it, but wasn't sure I would recommend it because it seemed like a lot of the same. (I have read a few sabbath books of late.) She commented that she often though that redundancy was what she needed and in thinking about it, I thought about how often God has spoken to me by putting the same message before me over and over and over again. I keep reading about sabbath because I'm trying hard to fig A friend asked me before I finished if I liked this book and would I recommend it. I told her I liked it, but wasn't sure I would recommend it because it seemed like a lot of the same. (I have read a few sabbath books of late.) She commented that she often though that redundancy was what she needed and in thinking about it, I thought about how often God has spoken to me by putting the same message before me over and over and over again. I keep reading about sabbath because I'm trying hard to figure out how to get enough of it in my life. All that said, this is a well written sabbath book and I am curious to see what the DVD and study that go with would be like. I will keep the book handy to use the appendix with scriptures and the quotes for devotion time.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    The guy is an awesome writer. I picked this book up at a campmeeting since I wanted something to read for a week, and was already thinking along these lines. It turned out to be a great relaxing read even though it also brought up some very valid points that made me think. I’ve kept a sabbath each week my entire life, but I have been challenged to make this day even more of a “stop day” than I have before. God knew what He was doing when He made this pattern for us!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brittney

    It really made me think about how I spend my time, priorities, what I'm teaching my kids about rest. I really enjoyed his medical stories and liked how he created so many examples to tie back into his points. I listened to the audiobook and it was done well, I enjoyed the narrator. It's one I'd like to get a hardcopy of to have on the shelves. I first heard of this author when he was on Annie F Downs' That Sounds Fun podcast.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    Life changing. The sabbath is truly a blessing from God and we forfeit its grace when we treat it like any other day. If you feel constantly exhausted or overworked you need to read this. (Don’t be fooled by the prosperity gospel-ish subtitle.) We modern people work like slaves for our careers because we think that’s what defines us. The sabbath reminds us of where our true identity is and how true grace and blessing come from God, not the workaholic servitude of false gods.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Adam Godbold

    I loved it. I needed it. I enjoyed it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    I really didn't know anything about Sleeth when I picked this up. As I recall, it was a free (or nearly free) offer on Amazon for the kindle version. Sleeth writes fairly well, and integrates most of his anecdotes well into the flow of the points he wants to make. Sometimes he gets a little repetitive, and makes some assertions that he doesn't back up well -- but all in all it is a decent book. I greatly appreciate his practical approach to the issues surrounding sabbath keeping as a gift, made f I really didn't know anything about Sleeth when I picked this up. As I recall, it was a free (or nearly free) offer on Amazon for the kindle version. Sleeth writes fairly well, and integrates most of his anecdotes well into the flow of the points he wants to make. Sometimes he gets a little repetitive, and makes some assertions that he doesn't back up well -- but all in all it is a decent book. I greatly appreciate his practical approach to the issues surrounding sabbath keeping as a gift, made for man, a source of joy for us in this life if we'll embrace it. There is much that sabbath keeping has to teach us, and I feel like for the most part the author does well in bringing that out. There have been many in the past that have fallen into the pharisees trap of drafting rules around how you keep the sabbath. Many writers today rightly shy away from that, but given how alien sabbath keeping is in this age, having someone write about it practically - but not in the sense of giving rules - is greatly appreciated. All of that said, it's worth noting that Eugene Peterson writes the foreward for this, and I believe he uses The Message for many, if not most, of his scriptural references. Some of his theological statements are unsurprisingly not particularly nuanced, and sometimes (at least in my view) he gets a little out-of-bounds theologically. Still, taken as a whole, it is a book well worth reading -- just spit out the bones. It's short, and an easy read (just a few hours I believe).

  15. 5 out of 5

    Andria

    Overall, I thought this was a good primer on the *need* for Sabbath, but it didn't go much deeper than that. My complaints are similar to those I have for a lot of Christian non-fiction, unfortunately: -Chapters were divided into three separate sections, and yet the organization felt lacking. Chapters had subsections, but often they were only linked with a vague idea like "time." Sometimes chapters ended without anything resembling a closing paragraph. -As another reviewer noted, some of the script Overall, I thought this was a good primer on the *need* for Sabbath, but it didn't go much deeper than that. My complaints are similar to those I have for a lot of Christian non-fiction, unfortunately: -Chapters were divided into three separate sections, and yet the organization felt lacking. Chapters had subsections, but often they were only linked with a vague idea like "time." Sometimes chapters ended without anything resembling a closing paragraph. -As another reviewer noted, some of the scripture interpretation was very surface level. -The illustrations from the author's life (primarily his work as a doctor) sometimes took half the chapter, yet again would often be connected to the rest of the chapter in a vague way. In one chapter, he spent a page and a half describing how bad he was at school but how he loved watching movies on the projector, just so he could get to his real illustration: a film his teacher showed him once (which he described in two paragraphs). Why not just open with that? The author had some good thoughts, I just would have liked them arranged in something more cohesive. On the plus side, as I'm already thinking of Sabbath more these days, the list of Sabbath-related scripture, and the list of quotes at the back of the book gave me a place to start for further reading.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ric White

    I would like to give this 3.5 stars, but the rounding down is happening just because this book didn't really deliver on the promise to me. I love the first part of the book which explains the history, importance, and benefit of the Sabbath, and I appreciated the Scriptural references being brought together in a way I had not seen before. However, the 'prescription' part left me needing more - I woild say the book is more of a diagnosis. The recommendations on your own Sabbath take up only about I would like to give this 3.5 stars, but the rounding down is happening just because this book didn't really deliver on the promise to me. I love the first part of the book which explains the history, importance, and benefit of the Sabbath, and I appreciated the Scriptural references being brought together in a way I had not seen before. However, the 'prescription' part left me needing more - I woild say the book is more of a diagnosis. The recommendations on your own Sabbath take up only about 15% of the book. I guess I was expecting more examples od successful Sabbath in different areas. I would have liked some guidance for people who don't get the chance to take a regular day off of work or have other special work circumstances. I would have liked some discussion on working at a church in a volunteer role and how that sits in the idea of Sabbath. This came across as a one size fits all approach to Sabbath. A good launching point, but I need to go get the bulk of the content elsewhere.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Cheri

    This book made me think about my current practices and what Sabbath-keeping should look like in my own life. I think that should be the goal of a book like this; however, this book could have been much more effective with a better editor. It felt kind of schizophrenic while I was reading it. The author was a doctor, and we were supposed to take his medical expertise as part of the reason why we should keep Sabbath. Yet, much of the book was not about his professional expertise but rather his per This book made me think about my current practices and what Sabbath-keeping should look like in my own life. I think that should be the goal of a book like this; however, this book could have been much more effective with a better editor. It felt kind of schizophrenic while I was reading it. The author was a doctor, and we were supposed to take his medical expertise as part of the reason why we should keep Sabbath. Yet, much of the book was not about his professional expertise but rather his personal experiences (before and after salvation) and then later in the book there was quite a bit of discussion about his job as a professional Christian speaker. The end of the book feels unfinished. There are two entire chapters that are just quotes--biblical and historical--about the Sabbath. This feels like what you would do as research for a book. The book just bizarrely ends and then there are these chapters stuffed in there as filler. Worth a read as inspiration.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    I read this book in anticipation of Dr. Sleeth coming to our church to preach on the topic of keeping the Sabbath. The book and his message were a welcome knock on the head, reminding me of the importance of setting aside a "stop day" to rest and reflect. Now I am taking measures to anticipate and protect my Sabbath, and I want to impress that on my kids also. This is a quick read, with humor and stories from Dr. Sleeth's career as an emergency room physician. I highly recommend it. From 24/6: "My I read this book in anticipation of Dr. Sleeth coming to our church to preach on the topic of keeping the Sabbath. The book and his message were a welcome knock on the head, reminding me of the importance of setting aside a "stop day" to rest and reflect. Now I am taking measures to anticipate and protect my Sabbath, and I want to impress that on my kids also. This is a quick read, with humor and stories from Dr. Sleeth's career as an emergency room physician. I highly recommend it. From 24/6: "My Saturday “Stop Days” launched me on a journey toward the three Rs of Sabbath: rest, renewal, and reverence. In Sabbath keeping, we rest from more than our labors. We rest from the tyranny of the urgent, the staggering precipice of eternity, and the mundane workweek. In the Sabbath’s renewal, we catch a glimpse of the divine. And our response to the divine is reverence."

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Juliano

    I always weary of these kind of books, they usually take more forever to get through; I would rather read a story with a plot, but this was given to me as a gift so I wanted to reciprocate and read the gift. I thought the message was spot on with a lot of thinking I had come to on my own or have been tossing around in my mind. This book put thoughts together with solid day to day examples without laying a heavy guilt on you. I was able to blast through the book fairly quickly, for myself anyway. I always weary of these kind of books, they usually take more forever to get through; I would rather read a story with a plot, but this was given to me as a gift so I wanted to reciprocate and read the gift. I thought the message was spot on with a lot of thinking I had come to on my own or have been tossing around in my mind. This book put thoughts together with solid day to day examples without laying a heavy guilt on you. I was able to blast through the book fairly quickly, for myself anyway. If you are a believer or not there is some real though provoking ideas to what it means rest and how we need it physically and mentally. I felt the book was a reaffirming voice of reason in my mind and well worth the read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Especially suited for workaholics who know they need to slow down. But this is more than just a treaties on getting more rest. It is about a life-change and commitment toward something (almost) no one values. It is also about faith ... faith that God will do more if you do less. And even though this is written from a Christian author, it is not "preachy" in its tone and I believe would be equally enjoyable and valuable for those not looking for a "Christian" book. The author is an ER doc and he Especially suited for workaholics who know they need to slow down. But this is more than just a treaties on getting more rest. It is about a life-change and commitment toward something (almost) no one values. It is also about faith ... faith that God will do more if you do less. And even though this is written from a Christian author, it is not "preachy" in its tone and I believe would be equally enjoyable and valuable for those not looking for a "Christian" book. The author is an ER doc and he artfully weaves tales and illustrations from his medical career into the book to make his points.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dkovlak

    This was a very good book about keeping the Sabbath. This is one of the 10 Commandments, so it is a no-brainer that we must follow it. The issue is how do we follow it? This is the subject of many books and articles. It is clear that it should be set aside as Holy to benefit God’s children. The author uses a number of personal examples. He was an Emergency Room Physician before becoming a Pastor. He does not tell the reader what they MUST DO or MUST NOT DO.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lynette Karg

    I agree with the author's premise that we were not designed to go 24/7, and he makes a compelling case for including rest in our lives. It is a case largely based on Old Testament law and practice, practical anecdotes, and science. I would have liked to see a more thorough look at the New Testament teaching on this; without a focus on Christ, who is our Sabbath rest, it falls short of the mark.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Lewton

    Much of the book is a set of stories from his work as a physician. The author intended to illustrate Sabbath, but it felt more like he was trying to tell stories about his work that didn’t exactly connect with Sabbath keeping. The best Sabbath keeping books I’ve read come from Walter Brueggemann and Barbara Brown Taylor. I would stick with those.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Leigh Anne

    Refreshing, humorous, and thought provoking! Really enjoyed his scriptures and quotes at the end!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Albright

    Since this book gets a lot wrong (more on that shortly), it is worthwhile to discuss at some length what this book gets right.  Coming at the question of the freedom and benefits of Sabbath observance from the perspective of a rural doctor concerned about the mad rush of contemporary society as well as the poor health that results from rushed lives and a lack of rest, the author manages to make an eloquent appeal for having at least one day a week focused on rest.  The author's specific claims a Since this book gets a lot wrong (more on that shortly), it is worthwhile to discuss at some length what this book gets right.  Coming at the question of the freedom and benefits of Sabbath observance from the perspective of a rural doctor concerned about the mad rush of contemporary society as well as the poor health that results from rushed lives and a lack of rest, the author manages to make an eloquent appeal for having at least one day a week focused on rest.  The author's specific claims about such varied matters as the Sabbath for Christians or his odd and very inaccurate beliefs about the Hebrew calendar (which he seems to confuse with the rules about the Egyptian calendar) notwithstanding, there is a lot to appreciate here but the author is not quite as knowledgeable about the Sabbath as he thinks he is.  Like many mainstream Christians the author doesn't want to acknowledge God's laws as valid or truly obey what God has commanded, but as he sees considerable value in the Sabbath, even if not as commanded in the Bible, there is still a lot of worth here, so long as one recognizes the flaws in the author's approach. Coming in at about 200 pages, this particular book is a a quick read with 4 parts and twelve chapters and various supplementary material.  Beginning with a foreword from the man behind the overrated "Message" paraphrase of the Bible and a note from the author, the author begins with a discussion of our contemporary fast-paced 24/7 world (I) with chapters on what is missing from contemporary life (1), remembering the Sabbath (2), and how the Sabbath was transformed by Pharisaic legalism (3).  After that the author talks about why we need a day of rest (II) with discussions on Jesus and the Sabbath (4), lessons from Nehemiah (5), and the need to rest in rest (6).  The author then discusses how one keeps a day of rest (III) with discussions of time (7), place (8), and the miracle of the manna (9) and its implications.  Finally, the author discusses what the reader's 24/6 life will look like (IV) with chapters on the amount of rest it includes (10), the celebratory aspects of the Sabbath (11), and an invitation to commit to rest (12).  The author ten includes scriptures, quotes, and blessings, some of them adapted from Judaism, and some notes about the author to conclude the supplementary material from the book. There are a lot of things that could have made this book better.  For example, it is rather telling that the author does not include among the Sabbath scriptures of the Bible the numerous examples of Sabbath worship that can be found in the book of Acts that demonstrate that the biblical seventh-day Sabbath is still commanded for Christians today (see also Hebrews 4:9).  The author makes it clear that he wants mainstream Christians to see and seize the benefits of the Sabbath without feeling it necessary to obey the biblical command or have a high view of biblical law.  Obviously the author and I differ on this and many other matters.  That said, we read and review the books that are written, not the books we would have preferred to have read, and the author does come at the Sabbath from a worthwhile angle of health, even if his reasoning is unsound and he tries way too hard to appeal to antinomian Hellenistic Christian thinking.  For those who want to see what a mainstream Christian, albeit one with a strongly social and environmental "justice" bent, has to say about the Sabbath, this is a worthy book to check out.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Any Length

    This is a very Christian book. It does talk about the importance of taking one day a week off. However, it does not necessarily say for us to go have fun. It makes a big case of spending a part of this day with God. Prayer, reading the bible. meditation, etc. I do believe in the concept and I am one of the generation who grew up with Sundays being "sacred family time with mostly nothing much on the TV and kids suffering endless boredom and you couldn't buy anything for love or money", to Sundays This is a very Christian book. It does talk about the importance of taking one day a week off. However, it does not necessarily say for us to go have fun. It makes a big case of spending a part of this day with God. Prayer, reading the bible. meditation, etc. I do believe in the concept and I am one of the generation who grew up with Sundays being "sacred family time with mostly nothing much on the TV and kids suffering endless boredom and you couldn't buy anything for love or money", to Sundays being erroded to "go shopping and spend every last dollar you have earned this week to make yourself feel better because you are living in a spritual void." So why do I say this book is ok, and why do I not say it's great? Because I felt there was an oversupply of bible verses and a lack of passion for that Sunday off. I just didn't hear "my relationship with my kids is so much better". I didn't hear "my kids and my wife and I pray together". I didn't hear how to fill a free day without going out and doing things or going shopping that will be an equal thrill in people's lives, especially when they "haven't found God yet." To tell them to take a day off means they'll be bored be 9am and revert back to what they used to do. Which is switching on the TV and ordering pizza. Telling them to go to church and read the bible isn't going to cut it for most of them. There isn't enough "meat" to fill a day. And most of them will feel that they now are under pressure to "shove and push" even more stuff into the other days so as not to have to go shopping or do the laundry or the cooking for next week on Sunday. We now work about 10 hours more than 25 years ago and with all the extra things we've "had to" put into our days through peer and social pressure we just do not have the time to take a day off. Most parents need to take this daughter to a friends birthday party, and that son to soccer practice. If they tell their kids they can't go because it's Sunday and it's the day off, they will be told they are depriving their kids. Social pressure will not let them mix with others and they will be ostracized.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Drew

    What would it be like if we all took a day off each week to enjoy quiet time, relaxing, fellowship, and time with the Lord? I know, sounds insane and impossible, right? After all, Mom and Dad both have full time jobs, and when they aren’t at work, they have to be sure that the kids get off to school on time, that there is food in the fridge when they get home, that Timmy gets to soccer practice, that Emily doesn’t miss ballet, that the house gets cleaned, and more. Often, if you’re a Christian fa What would it be like if we all took a day off each week to enjoy quiet time, relaxing, fellowship, and time with the Lord? I know, sounds insane and impossible, right? After all, Mom and Dad both have full time jobs, and when they aren’t at work, they have to be sure that the kids get off to school on time, that there is food in the fridge when they get home, that Timmy gets to soccer practice, that Emily doesn’t miss ballet, that the house gets cleaned, and more. Often, if you’re a Christian family, there’s even more to do! You also have to be sure that the family isn’t late for church, that kids get to the proper Sunday school classes, that Mom gets the event for Women’s Ministry planned, that Dad’s at Deacons’ meeting, and that everyone remembers to read their Bible and pray each day. All of this is on our plates, and you want us to drop everything and take a day – just - OFF? Yep, that’s the general idea. Silly, isn’t it? Yet that is a very major part of the theme in Dr. Matthew Sleeth’s newest book, 24/6 (interestingly enough, when I just typed the book title, spell check underlined the number 6 with it’s angry red perforations. Even computers seem to know these days that we are supposed to be going 24 hours a day, seven days a week, with no room for rest in between!) All in all, I loved this book. I first became acquainted with Dr. Sleeth a couple years ago when I became convicted that I, as a Christian, should learn to appreciate and care for God’s creation. As I stumbled across liberal blog after liberal blog about being a good treehugger, I started to become discouraged. Are there no Christians out there who appreciate the creation God has given us? I thought. It was at that time that I stumbled across the website of Blessed Earth (www.blessedearth.org) and felt encouraged. After discovering this Bible based organization that helps Christians learn about and live creation care, I read Matthew’s first book, Serve God, Save the Planet. My initial thought was that the title sounded cliche, and – you guessed it – liberal. Still, I liked what I had learned so far about Blessed Earth, so I gave the book a shot, and I have loved Dr. Sleeth’s writing ever since. The premise of his latest installment is that Christians are called by God to observe the Sabbath. The Sabbath is to be a day of rest, a day of pursuing one’s relationship with God (and if you feel those two ideas are mutually exclusive, you really don’t understand the concept of having a relationship with the Jesus I know), a day of fellowship with family and friends, and a day of holiness. Is work a bad thing? Of course not. The Bible commands us to work and condemns laziness and idleness, but the God who created us also understands our need for time away from those things. He created the Sabbath for man because He created man with a need for a relationship with Him, as well as a need for rest. The biblical concept of the Sabbath is God’s acknowledgement of both. When we remember the fourth commandment and live it the way God intended, the good that this will do for us and our relationships with the Lord will be a tremendous blessing. I can already hear the objections: This is the legalism of the Pharisees! We are no longer under the Mosaic Law! We’re now under grace! We don’t have to keep those commandments anymore! Let me state simply that it is not. One cannot get many pages into this book without discovering that Sleeth is careful to point out that he believes in following the spirit of the Law, not the letter of the Law. If the Pharisees could label something as work, it was not allowed on the Sabbath. In the teachings of Jesus, He is quick to point out that the Pharisees missed the whole point of the Law that was given in the first place. They constantly accused those who would help others on the Sabbath, but if one is in need, how are they to enjoy the Sabbath? How can they rest when they are going hungry, maybe even can’t feed their children? What if they are sick? What if they just lost their home? Are we as Christians to say: That can wait until Monday? Of course not. If the idea behind the Sabbath is to focus on the first and greatest commandment, and the second which is like unto it, how can we sit back and watch a brother suffer and still enjoy fellowship with the Lord? We can’t. It simply doesn’t work that way. We can, however, have a day where we skip sports practices and games, refuse to go to the office, put school work aside, and instead really rest and relax. Do minimal work around the house, read the Bible or other books, take naps when the urge hits us, watch that favorite movie or TV show, go to church and fellowship with friends and family, or go for a walk, sometimes just with the Lord, and sometimes with others as well. I have to admit, I was an easy sell for this book. It has long bothered me to see Christians completely ignore this commandment and act as if Sunday (or whatever day they choose to observe as the Sabbath) is no different from any other day of the week. When I was in college, I began a regular practice of taking Sunday off from school work, cleaning my dorm, and other similar activities. At first this was difficult. I found myself bored on Sundays. It was also sometimes problematic because I started finding that taking a day off demanded preparation beforehand. This meant doing my studying and cleaning on Saturday, when others wanted to go out and play until it was time to cram at the last minute. The boredom would occasionally get to me, I would finally cave and start cleaning or studying. After a while, I finally found myself giving up, and just treating my Sundays like I always had before: any other day of the week. Soon after I went back to my old way of doing things, however, I found myself more worn out than ever, and as if I was truly missing something. My brain felt like it was on overload, and I had trouble finding peace and quiet which my mind and body needed desperately. I was also missing those wonderful quiet moments with the Lord. After I started taking one day a week, I noticed that some of my most special moments of fellowship with Him, or some of my most profound insights into scripture, came on or soon after Sunday. With scripture, as well as personal experience in mind, this book simply rang true with me. I also appreciate Dr. Sleeth’s writing style: easy to read, packed with scripture, and filled with personal anecdotes that are sometimes humorous, sometimes convicting, sometimes causing a variety of other feelings and emotions. After finishing this book, I would not hesitate to recommend 24/6 to anyone who wishes to learn about a biblical perspective on keeping the Sabbath.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Harold Cameron

    “Remember the Sabbath and keep it holy.” Sounds nice, but how do we find rest in a 24/7 world? Just as the Hebrews were slaves in Egypt, we have become slaves to technology. Our technological tools allow 24-hour productivity and connectivity, give us more control, and subtlety enslave us to busyness itself. Sabbath is about restraint, about intentionally not doing everything all the time just because we can. Setting aside a day of rest helps us reconnect with our Creator and find the peace of God “Remember the Sabbath and keep it holy.” Sounds nice, but how do we find rest in a 24/7 world? Just as the Hebrews were slaves in Egypt, we have become slaves to technology. Our technological tools allow 24-hour productivity and connectivity, give us more control, and subtlety enslave us to busyness itself. Sabbath is about restraint, about intentionally not doing everything all the time just because we can. Setting aside a day of rest helps us reconnect with our Creator and find the peace of God that passes all understanding. The Sabbath is about letting go of the controls one day a week and letting God be God. So how do we do it? In 24/6, Dr. Matthew Sleeth describes our symptoms, clarifies the signs, diagnoses the illness, and lays out a simple plan for living a healthier, more God-centered life in a digitally-dazed, always-on world. Sleeth shares how his own family was dramatically transformed when it adopted Sabbath practices and helps readers better understand how their own lives can be transformed – physically, emotionally, relationally and spiritually – by adopting the 24/6 lifestyle.” (From the Tyndale House Website) About the Author: Matthew Sleeth, MD, a former emergency room physician, felt like he was straightening deck chairs on the Titanic saving one patient at a time while the whole ship (Earth) was going down. Following a new calling, Dr. Sleeth resigned from his position as chief of the medical staff and director of a busy ER to teach, preach, and write about faith and the environment throughout the country. Matthew's first book, Serve God, Save the Planet was selected as a finalist for a 2008 Christianity Today award in the Christianity & Culture category. He also wrote the Introduction to HarperOne's Green Bible. An highly sought after speaker, Dr. Sleeth has spoken at more than 1,000 churches, campuses, and events – both Christian and secular - in the last five years, including Joel Hunter's Northland in Orlando, John Weece's Southland in Lexington, Danny O'Brian's Grace Fellowship in Baltimore, and the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. Dr. Sleeth lives in Lexington, Kentucky, with his wife Nancy. My Thoughts About the Book: If you are sick and tired of being totally “sick and tired” as a person because you are stuck on the fast paced treadmill of life and are going nowhere but on a downward spiral spiritually, physically, emotionally and relationally with others then the book 24/6 written by Dr. Matthew Sleeth M D might just be the book for you to read. And now might just be the time for you to get a copy of his book and read it as the good doctor offers a good and effective remedy for the unhappiness and dis-ease that plagues so many people today – and possibly even you. His “prescription for a healthier and happier life is the same one revealed to us by God in his Word and that is REST: simply put spiritual, physical and emotional rest. In his insightful and beneficial book Dr. Sleeth does NOT present a bunch of laws or rules for us to obey nor does he provide quick and easy spiritual microwave type truths that if we will but do them then everything that is wrong with our lives will suddenly be better in 60 seconds or less. In his book he refers to the Scriptures as well as from his own personal experience as an E R doctor and the lives of others how in our 24/7 world we need…no, rather we must learn how to live a 24/6 life taking “time” for a “Sabbath” each week as well as time for relationships and other important elements of our lives. I like what he writes, “We need the Sabbath for the perspective that it gives us. You have more than you think if you think you have too little, and you have less than you think if you believe you have it all.” His approach is not legalistic and meant to engender more bondage in our lives as most of us already have an unhealthy dose of that to deal with in our 24/7 world. No, he advocates living our lives in freedom with the perspective of a 24/6 existence with our living and working and doing all the stuff we need to get done 6 days a week and then taking time to rest on the 7th day. He also shares the radical concept of taking “Sabbaticals” or an extended period of time for “retreats or pilgrimages” occasionally to experience the kind of meaningful moments that can only be experienced during such time periods in our lives. And from my own experience, though limited at best, and not meant to be held up as the absolute standard for all truth and how to live to be sure, I have learned that by my stopping and actually - literally resting one day a week does make a difference in my life. It’s made a significant difference. I turn off my cell phone, do not do any “work” on my computer and spend the morning with my church family and then the rest of the day with my family as well as with the Lord in prayer and the reading of his Word. And I also lie down and take a nap. And what I have noticed is that by my stopping one day a week and shutting out the noise of the world and resting, life and our world continues to go on, just as it has before without me being in the center of it doing, doing and doing until I feel like I am done and done in with nothing left to give God, others or myself. So, if you’re tired of the “rat race” of life read Dr. Sleeth’s book and get with God’s good 24/7 and 24/6 plan for your life and learn now to rest, relax and enjoy your Creator, your church family, family and friends as well as some time for you. You’ll be glad you did. Really! Disclosure of Material Connection: I received the book at no cost from the Tyndale House Publishing Company for review purposes. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marsha Lynn

    I'm a longtime advocate of sabbath rest. I explain it to others by saying, "God said I could have one day off a week." That makes it a gift I choose to receive more than an obligation. We don't hear much about sabbath-keeping in the church. This may be related to the fact that sermons are typically delivered by people whose chosen vocation requires the most of them on Sunday, the traditional day of rest for Christians. Given that dearth in sermons, it's good to encounter someone advocating for sa I'm a longtime advocate of sabbath rest. I explain it to others by saying, "God said I could have one day off a week." That makes it a gift I choose to receive more than an obligation. We don't hear much about sabbath-keeping in the church. This may be related to the fact that sermons are typically delivered by people whose chosen vocation requires the most of them on Sunday, the traditional day of rest for Christians. Given that dearth in sermons, it's good to encounter someone advocating for sabbath-keeping in the form of a book. It helps me remember I'm not alone. Like another reviewer, I would give this 3.5 stars if I could, but unlike that person, I rounded up because of what I mentioned above and because of the light tone of the author, putting a modern twist on biblical examples. The detracting factors are the fact that the message could be greatly condensed, meaning I was ready to quit listening before the audiobook finished and persevered only so I could mark it as read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jamila

    As a workaholic and having recently received my Ph.D., I can't recommend this book enough. It was so bad for me in figuring out what to do when I finally earned my doctorate and yet kept working anyway, that I forced myself to read this book on Sunday to keep myself from working. I did this for several months until it finally became habit not to work--that's how addicted to work I was! The storytelling is powerful: Dr. Sleeth toggles through stories of life and death in a way that drives the 24/ As a workaholic and having recently received my Ph.D., I can't recommend this book enough. It was so bad for me in figuring out what to do when I finally earned my doctorate and yet kept working anyway, that I forced myself to read this book on Sunday to keep myself from working. I did this for several months until it finally became habit not to work--that's how addicted to work I was! The storytelling is powerful: Dr. Sleeth toggles through stories of life and death in a way that drives the 24/6 point home. What good is life if we drive ourselves into an isolated death? The book overall is very accessible, though at times a little too repetitive. I appreciate his approach in looking at sabbath across different faiths, then honing in on the Christian tradition, and stating so clearly what is obvious to anyone outside of our time: the 24/7 mentality is more than just wrong, it is toxic. This would make a great book club text as there is a lot to talk about.

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