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Planning Los Angeles

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Los Angeles isn't planned; it just happens. Right? Not so fast! Despite the city's reputation for spontaneous evolution, a deliberate planning process shapes the way Los Angeles looks and lives. Editor David C. Sloane, a planning professor at the University of Southern California, has enlisted 30 essayists for a lively, richly illustrated view of this vibrant metropolis. P Los Angeles isn't planned; it just happens. Right? Not so fast! Despite the city's reputation for spontaneous evolution, a deliberate planning process shapes the way Los Angeles looks and lives. Editor David C. Sloane, a planning professor at the University of Southern California, has enlisted 30 essayists for a lively, richly illustrated view of this vibrant metropolis. Planning Los Angeles launches a new series from APA Planners Press. Each year Planners Press will bring out a new study on a major American city. Natives, newcomers, and out-of-towners will get insiders' views of today's hot-button issues and a sneak peek at the city to come.


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Los Angeles isn't planned; it just happens. Right? Not so fast! Despite the city's reputation for spontaneous evolution, a deliberate planning process shapes the way Los Angeles looks and lives. Editor David C. Sloane, a planning professor at the University of Southern California, has enlisted 30 essayists for a lively, richly illustrated view of this vibrant metropolis. P Los Angeles isn't planned; it just happens. Right? Not so fast! Despite the city's reputation for spontaneous evolution, a deliberate planning process shapes the way Los Angeles looks and lives. Editor David C. Sloane, a planning professor at the University of Southern California, has enlisted 30 essayists for a lively, richly illustrated view of this vibrant metropolis. Planning Los Angeles launches a new series from APA Planners Press. Each year Planners Press will bring out a new study on a major American city. Natives, newcomers, and out-of-towners will get insiders' views of today's hot-button issues and a sneak peek at the city to come.

35 review for Planning Los Angeles

  1. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Ping-tze

    Good material. Terrible book design. Very hard to read. Book designer is totally not up to the job. Cannot finish reading the book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Caroline DeJong

  3. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cole Grisham

  5. 4 out of 5

    Juli Valdunciel

  6. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  7. 5 out of 5

    Josh Paget

  8. 4 out of 5

    William

  9. 4 out of 5

    May

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michael Lewyn

    This book contains about forty planning-related essays about Los Angeles- some as short as a page, some longer, some boring, some interesting. Most of the essays emphasize, of course, that Los Angeles has been planned as much as any other American city. Some of the more interesting points: *Los Angeles's car-oriented streets were shaped in large part by the city's 1924 Major Traffic Street Plan, which created a grid of widened streets; by contrast, a similarly ambitious plan for parks was never i This book contains about forty planning-related essays about Los Angeles- some as short as a page, some longer, some boring, some interesting. Most of the essays emphasize, of course, that Los Angeles has been planned as much as any other American city. Some of the more interesting points: *Los Angeles's car-oriented streets were shaped in large part by the city's 1924 Major Traffic Street Plan, which created a grid of widened streets; by contrast, a similarly ambitious plan for parks was never implemented. One essay suggests that the Chamber of Commerce opposed the plan because it did not give them enough power (though that doesn't make sense to me because they could have lobbied for amendments). *The city has aggressively downzoned in recent decades, causing a housing shortage and high rents. Until the 1960s, developers and homeowners usually agreed. But once the city's open land started to dwindle, infill became more popular with developers, causing tensions with homeowners. *Los Angeles is much more like its suburbs than most cities- whether you look at the city's ethnic diversity or its poverty rate or its density levels and urban form. *Why didn't Los Angeles build new rail in the 1950s and 1960s? In 1948, the city council voted a rail proposal 8-6. Suburban business interests lobbied against it, because they had no interest in making it easier for people to reach downtown stores. *The city tried to subsidize downtown housing in the 1980s without much success. But once the city modified regulations that precluded such housing (such as parking/setback/density rules designed for suburbs), landowners were able to reuse older buildings and downtown started to become residential.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Derek Jordan

  12. 5 out of 5

    Donna

  13. 4 out of 5

    Colin Marshall

  14. 5 out of 5

    Robert Baird

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alan

  16. 4 out of 5

    James

  17. 4 out of 5

    David

  18. 5 out of 5

    John Valdez

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nick

  20. 5 out of 5

    Chriis

  21. 4 out of 5

    Seyron

  22. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

  23. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  25. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

  26. 4 out of 5

    David Welch

  27. 5 out of 5

    Csla

  28. 5 out of 5

    Aubrey

  29. 4 out of 5

    Abcdiana02

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chris Whittaker

  31. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Eck

  32. 4 out of 5

    Sean LeVan

  33. 4 out of 5

    RAP USC

  34. 5 out of 5

    Max

  35. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

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