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Everyday Racism: A Book for All Americans

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In today's media-driven society, not surprisingly, high-profile racist incidents make headlines. But what about the racism that seeps into our everyday lives--the pernicious, destructive acts that break down the social fabric and carve ever deeper divisions between us? Annie S. Barnes has solicited the stories of 150 black college students from middle-class backgrounds, who In today's media-driven society, not surprisingly, high-profile racist incidents make headlines. But what about the racism that seeps into our everyday lives--the pernicious, destructive acts that break down the social fabric and carve ever deeper divisions between us? Annie S. Barnes has solicited the stories of 150 black college students from middle-class backgrounds, who tell of their frequent encounters with racism--at school, at work, in their neighborhoods, at restaurants and shopping malls. Through their disquieting testimony, the daily indignities that black Americans still suffer are brought to light. Following these personal accounts, Barnes offers simple yet profound ideas for what blacks, whites and others can do to confront-and respond to-racism in all its guises.


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In today's media-driven society, not surprisingly, high-profile racist incidents make headlines. But what about the racism that seeps into our everyday lives--the pernicious, destructive acts that break down the social fabric and carve ever deeper divisions between us? Annie S. Barnes has solicited the stories of 150 black college students from middle-class backgrounds, who In today's media-driven society, not surprisingly, high-profile racist incidents make headlines. But what about the racism that seeps into our everyday lives--the pernicious, destructive acts that break down the social fabric and carve ever deeper divisions between us? Annie S. Barnes has solicited the stories of 150 black college students from middle-class backgrounds, who tell of their frequent encounters with racism--at school, at work, in their neighborhoods, at restaurants and shopping malls. Through their disquieting testimony, the daily indignities that black Americans still suffer are brought to light. Following these personal accounts, Barnes offers simple yet profound ideas for what blacks, whites and others can do to confront-and respond to-racism in all its guises.

39 review for Everyday Racism: A Book for All Americans

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ceegeez1

    I received hundreds of this publication for distribution. Having read it; although exasperating~ facing such a tedious avalanche chronicles of existential realities; its realism is worth its confrontational awakening. Optimally; it could be the educational field work basis for walking in the stepsđź‘Łof those having a collectively oppositional 'American' experience.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Keri

    Some of the stories related were very touching, and are an excellent antidote for anyone who wants to say that racism no longer exists in America today. Also, I appreciated the author's suggestions for how we can work to eliminate racism in specific arenas. Unfortunately, the approach was somewhat simplistic, and includes a number of negative assumptions about white people while trying to dispel negative assumptions of black people. Also, some of the events described as racist are ambiguous at b Some of the stories related were very touching, and are an excellent antidote for anyone who wants to say that racism no longer exists in America today. Also, I appreciated the author's suggestions for how we can work to eliminate racism in specific arenas. Unfortunately, the approach was somewhat simplistic, and includes a number of negative assumptions about white people while trying to dispel negative assumptions of black people. Also, some of the events described as racist are ambiguous at best. For example, in one story, a white woman frowns at a black woman drinking from a water fountain, and the explanation given is that the white woman must have been thinking that white people should be allowed to drink before black people. There are a number of possible explanations for this encounter, some of them racist and some not. However, as mentioned before, many of the stories are clear and moving accounts of difficulties experienced by young black people, and if you can ignore the clumsy interruptions of the author and the occasional questionable anecdote, you can learn much from this book about how racism still operates in our culture today.

  3. 5 out of 5

    CKE387

    How does racism interacts with everyday life? This book contains great examples from dealing with neighbors, shopping at the store, eating out and working out, workplace interactions, dealing with law enforcement and most interesting to me was "from day care to graduate school" dealing with racism in the school system from educators and fellow students (even in day care)! Interesting read and I liked how interactions were ordered from starting in the home (neighborhood) to broader areas (day car How does racism interacts with everyday life? This book contains great examples from dealing with neighbors, shopping at the store, eating out and working out, workplace interactions, dealing with law enforcement and most interesting to me was "from day care to graduate school" dealing with racism in the school system from educators and fellow students (even in day care)! Interesting read and I liked how interactions were ordered from starting in the home (neighborhood) to broader areas (day care, school; then shopping, eating out; to the workplace). Everyone probably has seen (or been a part of one) of these examples, the problem would be "what to do about it" when it happens. The book does offers some solutions.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    A collection of various narratives, in which Black people have encountered racism. This book is an easy read, using short analyses Barnes breaks down each instance of racism. Noting that there are good and bad people in every culture, Barnes still calls out inequality. The book even offers suggestions as to what can be done to remedy injustices against Black America. This is truly "A Book for All Americans."

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ghira

    Even though it plainly said this was a book of anecdotes from people dealing with racists, I expected something more... smh Anyway, it was very good and should be required reading for those who say racism no longer exists.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I give this book less than one star. Every word felt like an attack. I'd love to hear from anyone who has read this book and get their feedback.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie Morse

  8. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  9. 4 out of 5

    Eduardo

  10. 4 out of 5

    Aisha Banks

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  12. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Kravetz

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gary Lifsey

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amber

  15. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Birdwell

  16. 4 out of 5

    Josh Boyles

  17. 5 out of 5

    Cristina

  18. 5 out of 5

    Wil Davenport

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy Williams

  20. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  21. 4 out of 5

    Hasnain Raja

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dubiumundique

  23. 5 out of 5

    Gina

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ericka

  25. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jon Miner

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rae

  29. 4 out of 5

    Diane

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ivana

  31. 4 out of 5

    Cory Rimpson,

  32. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

  33. 5 out of 5

    Stephan Manning

  34. 5 out of 5

    Yeimi

  35. 4 out of 5

    Peacegal

  36. 4 out of 5

    MJ

  37. 4 out of 5

    Terri Burnor

  38. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

  39. 5 out of 5

    Nick

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