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Beyond the Asterisk: Understanding Native Students in Higher Education

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A Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 2013 While the success of higher education and student affairs is predicated on understanding the students we serve, the reality is, where the Native American population is concerned, that this knowledge is generally lacking. This lack may be attributed to this population's invisibility within the academy - it is often excluded from i A Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 2013 While the success of higher education and student affairs is predicated on understanding the students we serve, the reality is, where the Native American population is concerned, that this knowledge is generally lacking. This lack may be attributed to this population's invisibility within the academy - it is often excluded from institutional data and reporting, and frequently noted as not statistically significant - and its relegation to what is referred to as the "American Indian research asterisk." The purpose of this book is to move beyond the asterisk in an effort to better understand Native students, challenge the status quo, and provide an informed base for leaders in student and academic affairs, and administrators concerned with the success of students on their campuses. The authors of this book share their understanding of Native epistemologies, culture, and social structures, offering student affairs professionals and institutions a richer array of options, resources, and culturally-relevant and inclusive models to better serve this population. The book begins by providing insights into Native student experiences, presenting the first-year experience from a Native perspective, illustrating the role of a Native living/learning community in student retention, and discussing the importance of incorporating culture into student programming for Native students as well as the role of Native fraternities and sororities. The authors then consider administrative issues, such as the importance of outreach to tribal nations, the role of Tribal Colleges and Universities and opportunities for collaborations, and the development of Native American Student Services Units. . The book concludes with recommendations for how institutions can better serve Native students in graduate programs, the role that Indigenous faculty play in student success, and how professional associations can assist student affairs professionals with fulfilling their role of supporting the success of Native American students, staff, and faculty. This book moves beyond the asterisk to provide important insights from Native American higher education leaders and non-Native practitioners who have made Native students a priority in their work. While predominantly addressed to the student affairs profession - providing an understanding of the needs of the Native students it serves, describing the multi-faceted and unique issues, characteristics and experiences of this population, and sharing proven approaches to developing appropriate services - it also covers issues of broader administrative concern, such as collaboration with tribal colleges; as well academic issues, such as graduate and professional education. The book covers new material, as well as expanding on topics previously addressed in the literature, including Native American Greek organizations, incorporating Native culture into student programming, and the role of Native American Special Advisors. The contributors are themselves products of colleges and universities where Native students are too often invisible, and who succeeded despite the odds. Their insights and the examples they provide add richness to this book. It will provide a catalyst for new higher education practices that lead to direct, and increased support for, Native Americans and others who are working to remove the Native American asterisk from research and practice.


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A Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 2013 While the success of higher education and student affairs is predicated on understanding the students we serve, the reality is, where the Native American population is concerned, that this knowledge is generally lacking. This lack may be attributed to this population's invisibility within the academy - it is often excluded from i A Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 2013 While the success of higher education and student affairs is predicated on understanding the students we serve, the reality is, where the Native American population is concerned, that this knowledge is generally lacking. This lack may be attributed to this population's invisibility within the academy - it is often excluded from institutional data and reporting, and frequently noted as not statistically significant - and its relegation to what is referred to as the "American Indian research asterisk." The purpose of this book is to move beyond the asterisk in an effort to better understand Native students, challenge the status quo, and provide an informed base for leaders in student and academic affairs, and administrators concerned with the success of students on their campuses. The authors of this book share their understanding of Native epistemologies, culture, and social structures, offering student affairs professionals and institutions a richer array of options, resources, and culturally-relevant and inclusive models to better serve this population. The book begins by providing insights into Native student experiences, presenting the first-year experience from a Native perspective, illustrating the role of a Native living/learning community in student retention, and discussing the importance of incorporating culture into student programming for Native students as well as the role of Native fraternities and sororities. The authors then consider administrative issues, such as the importance of outreach to tribal nations, the role of Tribal Colleges and Universities and opportunities for collaborations, and the development of Native American Student Services Units. . The book concludes with recommendations for how institutions can better serve Native students in graduate programs, the role that Indigenous faculty play in student success, and how professional associations can assist student affairs professionals with fulfilling their role of supporting the success of Native American students, staff, and faculty. This book moves beyond the asterisk to provide important insights from Native American higher education leaders and non-Native practitioners who have made Native students a priority in their work. While predominantly addressed to the student affairs profession - providing an understanding of the needs of the Native students it serves, describing the multi-faceted and unique issues, characteristics and experiences of this population, and sharing proven approaches to developing appropriate services - it also covers issues of broader administrative concern, such as collaboration with tribal colleges; as well academic issues, such as graduate and professional education. The book covers new material, as well as expanding on topics previously addressed in the literature, including Native American Greek organizations, incorporating Native culture into student programming, and the role of Native American Special Advisors. The contributors are themselves products of colleges and universities where Native students are too often invisible, and who succeeded despite the odds. Their insights and the examples they provide add richness to this book. It will provide a catalyst for new higher education practices that lead to direct, and increased support for, Native Americans and others who are working to remove the Native American asterisk from research and practice.

46 review for Beyond the Asterisk: Understanding Native Students in Higher Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kari

    This book gives Native perspective on best practices and [sometimes harsh] realities of engaging Native students and teachers in higher education, all the way through graduate/professional and tenure levels. It is nicely divided into chapters to allow the reader to pull out the most relevant material for their situation.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Boyer-Kelly

    Native Americans make up less than 1% of the college population and at the same time they are the student population that is the least likely to graduate. This is a horrible, but true, statistic that the educators and professionals in this collection of higher education essays address. Authors suggest that "education, particularly higher education, is a necessary component of tribal nation building" and therefore we must change these statistics so that more Native students are experiencing a qua Native Americans make up less than 1% of the college population and at the same time they are the student population that is the least likely to graduate. This is a horrible, but true, statistic that the educators and professionals in this collection of higher education essays address. Authors suggest that "education, particularly higher education, is a necessary component of tribal nation building" and therefore we must change these statistics so that more Native students are experiencing a quality higher education, and one that they are likely to finish (p17). There is a lot of summary within each essay about the differences between mainstream institutions (4-year colleges, like the University of Arizona) and two-year colleges (especially Tribal Colleges and Universities, often just listed as TCUs). A lot of the essayists provide examples of how to make courses and the college campus more inclusive to Native students. There are also discussions of how it might benefit educational institutions to actually hire people in Student Affairs that understand multiple cultures. One of my favorite essays in the compilation is "First-Year Experience for Native American Freshmen: The University of Arizona First-Year Scholars Program" authored by Amanda Tachine (Dine) and Karen Francis-Begay (Dine). The article is about making inclusive programs that unite Native students, give them a voice, a place to study, etc., where they can feel closer to home. One thing the authors mention is that there are differences between the independent self and the community, noting "Native American students, as they may question their identity and values while in college and when their 'way of life' contradicts mainstream values" (p27). Helpful suggestions include having special courses, Native-specific housing, not stigmatizing remedial courses, and the effects are often positive: provides a family atmosphere, provides academic support, and encourages individual development (p34). All in all, a really great resource for those interested in higher education.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nicki

  4. 5 out of 5

    Parker Watson

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  6. 4 out of 5

    Molly Hall-Martin

  7. 5 out of 5

    JR

  8. 4 out of 5

    J.T.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Angus

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rosie Nelson

  11. 4 out of 5

    Marnica Stoll

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kristi

  13. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Jeffries

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rhiannon

  15. 5 out of 5

    Julianna

  16. 5 out of 5

    Christina

  17. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten

  20. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chanel Cook

  24. 5 out of 5

    Valyncia Raphael

  25. 4 out of 5

    Stacey

  26. 4 out of 5

    Anastasia Wickham

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dani

  28. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Ryan

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joe Phillips

  31. 4 out of 5

    Ke

  32. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Boles

  33. 5 out of 5

    Ariel

  34. 5 out of 5

    Ramona

  35. 4 out of 5

    Cassie Christman

  36. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlin

  37. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline Lee

  38. 4 out of 5

    Janet

  39. 4 out of 5

    Matt Clemons

  40. 4 out of 5

    Sus

  41. 4 out of 5

    Dayna

  42. 4 out of 5

    Tia

  43. 5 out of 5

    Emmanuelle Chiocca

  44. 4 out of 5

    Rocha Gilmore

  45. 4 out of 5

    Gwyn

  46. 5 out of 5

    C. Elizabeth

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