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Missing 411: Eastern United States

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"Missing 411-Eastern United States" is David Paulides' second book of a two part series about people who have disappeared in the wilds of North America. "Missing 411-Western U.S." was released March 1, 2012 and has garnered wide spread publicity and favorable reviews. The eastern version covers similar disappearances for the east, but also includes the master list of missi "Missing 411-Eastern United States" is David Paulides' second book of a two part series about people who have disappeared in the wilds of North America. "Missing 411-Western U.S." was released March 1, 2012 and has garnered wide spread publicity and favorable reviews. The eastern version covers similar disappearances for the east, but also includes the master list of missing people from both books and a special list of children under 10 years who have been identified in both versions. Every story in each book is 100% factual. The eastern version contains chapters identifying clusters of missing people from the eastern section of the United States but also includes one chapter on Ontario (Canada) hunters who have disappeared. The book also contains chapters on berry pickers, sheepherders and farmers that have vanished from throughout North America under unusual circumstances. Both versions of Missing 411 identify portions of 28 clusters of missing people that have been documented throughout the U.S. and Canada. Sometimes these clusters are purely geographical while others identify a linkage based on age and sex of the victims, a very troubling and surprising find by researchers.


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"Missing 411-Eastern United States" is David Paulides' second book of a two part series about people who have disappeared in the wilds of North America. "Missing 411-Western U.S." was released March 1, 2012 and has garnered wide spread publicity and favorable reviews. The eastern version covers similar disappearances for the east, but also includes the master list of missi "Missing 411-Eastern United States" is David Paulides' second book of a two part series about people who have disappeared in the wilds of North America. "Missing 411-Western U.S." was released March 1, 2012 and has garnered wide spread publicity and favorable reviews. The eastern version covers similar disappearances for the east, but also includes the master list of missing people from both books and a special list of children under 10 years who have been identified in both versions. Every story in each book is 100% factual. The eastern version contains chapters identifying clusters of missing people from the eastern section of the United States but also includes one chapter on Ontario (Canada) hunters who have disappeared. The book also contains chapters on berry pickers, sheepherders and farmers that have vanished from throughout North America under unusual circumstances. Both versions of Missing 411 identify portions of 28 clusters of missing people that have been documented throughout the U.S. and Canada. Sometimes these clusters are purely geographical while others identify a linkage based on age and sex of the victims, a very troubling and surprising find by researchers.

30 review for Missing 411: Eastern United States

  1. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    This is the first book that I've read in less than a day in quite some time. Compelling doesn't begin to describe it. The author makes an intriguing, but unspoken, case for a solution to the disappearances. Some readers may be disappointed because the book raises more questions than it answers. It's fascinating reading for supernatural/paranormal armchair researchers like me who hunger for fresh info and perspectives on anomalous topics. Can't wait to begin the western edition!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Robello

    If you love trying to solve mysteries, these cases will boggle your mind. People have been mysteriously disappearing from the forests of North America starting in the 1800s and they continue to go missing today. The cases compiled in this book are not your usual missing persons cases. They are people missing under unusual circumstances. At the end of the book, the author lists and groups the data according to age, gender, location, date, season, whether FBI were involved, similarities between cas If you love trying to solve mysteries, these cases will boggle your mind. People have been mysteriously disappearing from the forests of North America starting in the 1800s and they continue to go missing today. The cases compiled in this book are not your usual missing persons cases. They are people missing under unusual circumstances. At the end of the book, the author lists and groups the data according to age, gender, location, date, season, whether FBI were involved, similarities between cases, etc. and you are encouraged to contact the author if you have any leads or useful information.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Gene

    Unbelievable!! Makes you wary to go in the woods. Given the authors experience, it is informative to read the analysis of each of these cases.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dana Rowsey

    Missing 411 Eastern Before you read my review, I will say that I have not read this book because it's not worth the price of more than $50. I have listened to several of his interviews. The author has written other books on Bigfoot. The definition of Bigfoot is: An imaginary animal that walks like a human, but is bigger than a human, known only by its large footprints and rare reports of sightings in the northwest US; sasquatch. The author, although compelling in his interviews, has not taken Missing 411 Eastern Before you read my review, I will say that I have not read this book because it's not worth the price of more than $50. I have listened to several of his interviews. The author has written other books on Bigfoot. The definition of Bigfoot is: An imaginary animal that walks like a human, but is bigger than a human, known only by its large footprints and rare reports of sightings in the northwest US; sasquatch. The author, although compelling in his interviews, has not taken part in an actual wilderness search & rescue operation. I can pick this up in his interviews. Searching an area and not finding anything and then finding some after searching the same area is common. You have to account for human error, lighting conditions, effective sweep widths, experience, etc. I am a graduate of the National Search & Rescue School & Lost Person Behavior School and these factors are taken into account. Missing people undressing is not unusual either. It is called Paradoxical Undressing. There very well could be abductions in the cases but he shouldn't imply that Bigfoot got them. He has cherry picked these cases and made it appear as if these are the typical cases. They are not.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Addison

    This is the 2nd book in the series (and it's the 2nd book by virtue of being the 2nd half of the 1st book) and it answers some questions that have been bugging me after reading Missing 411: The Devil's in the Detail. 1. The 411 is the 411 people whose cases are presented in the 1st 2 books. 2. Paulides' hidden agenda, being not so hidden at the start, is Bigfoot. He started out in the fringe world of cryptozoology & ufology & their ilk as a Bigfoot researcher, so this isn't a SURPRISE, but it's ni This is the 2nd book in the series (and it's the 2nd book by virtue of being the 2nd half of the 1st book) and it answers some questions that have been bugging me after reading Missing 411: The Devil's in the Detail. 1. The 411 is the 411 people whose cases are presented in the 1st 2 books. 2. Paulides' hidden agenda, being not so hidden at the start, is Bigfoot. He started out in the fringe world of cryptozoology & ufology & their ilk as a Bigfoot researcher, so this isn't a SURPRISE, but it's nice to have it confirmed. He's pretending, even at the beginning, not to have a theory, but the inclusion of Roy Bilgrien, who was NEVER missing, but who WAS almost abducted by something his mother described alternately as a bear and a wolf, shows Paulides' hand very clearly. So this review is mostly about the problems I have with Paulides, because otherwise it's just "here are a bunch of unexplained disappearances about which I have a theory I will not tell you but in true Socratic fashion will hit you over the head with ("Think about the reasons why this may be occurring" (122)) until you tell it to me." My chief problem is actually not Bigfoot; it's the shoddy sloppiness of Paulides' research. I will give one example, although there are plenty of others. In discussing the SAR (Search and Rescue) efforts after the disappearance of Dennis Martin in Great Smoky Mountains National Park (from a place I've definitely been near, if not actually to), Paulides says: "In one of the more surprising twists to the SAR, it was discovered that the park service closed Cades Cove Loop Road for three days, without explanation. . . . There is nothing in the documentation I received [after filing a FOIA] explaining why the cove was closed" (M411 150). So, pursuing a different aspect of Dennis Martin's disappearance that Paulides deals with badly (more about that in a minute), I Googled the FBI agent assigned to observe, Jim Rike. That Google search brought up a document called the Dennis Martin Search Chronological Narrative, which is the National Park Service's report on the SAR effort. This document was requested & received by the Knoxville News-Sentinel in 1969, no FOIA needed, and on p. 11 it says: "The Cades Cove road was closed to keep the many curiosity seekers away from the Cades Cove heliport" (DMSCN 11). Now, if you are a conspiracy-minded person, you may choose not to believe this explanation, but it is patently untrue that no explanation was given. This is unforgivably sloppy research. It's part and parcel of Paulides' fundamental problem, which is that he's not a researcher. He has no formal training and it's clear that he's not doing a good job of training himself. He makes errors like this one. He misses obvious cross-references, like "in the early 1930s there is another major increase of men and women missing, with the escalation staying elevated until today" (307), where GOSH I WONDER IF MAYBE THERE WAS SOME MAJOR SOCIAL DISASTER THAT BEFELL AMERICA IN 1929 THAT MIGHT EXPLAIN THIS INCREASE. He doesn't contextualize his cases at all, except in terms of each other. He tells us, with a kind of ghoulish satisfaction, that Jim Rike (the FBI agent I mentioned above) committed suicide, but offers no proof that his suicide was because of his work on cases involving missing children. There are other reasons a guy might be suicidal. (An article about Dennis Martin on Tales of the Weird says that Rike's reasons are unknown, and I feel like a ghoul myself so I'm not digging further.) And it becomes important to remember that Paulides is skewing his data. He's only interested in MP cases that fit his (weird-ass) criteria. As an experiment, I checked West Virginia's MP in NamUs. Paulides has 5; NamUs lists 72. The kicker? Only one of Paulides' cases is in NamUs (Victor Shoemaker). One of the others is on Porchlight. The other three were found (2 alive, 1 dead)--but their disappearances fit Paulides' schema, so in they go. This is a pretty wild distortion in describing national trends of disappearances and means that you need to keep the salt shaker handy. So why do I keep reading him? He does have an impressive collection of raw data and bizarre stories, and something in my back-brain just chews on this stuff like homemade caramels.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sonic

    Never mind the content, for the moment, let's first talk about the presentation. Mr. Paulides, get thee to an editor! I looked for an editor credit and it was also "Missing," and there was much that made me want to volunteer my own humble services, though I am myself not an editor. So there were challenges for me that should not have been there, IMO, and there was much that could have been improved, like footnotes, and cross-referencing. But all grammatical challenges should have been removed espec Never mind the content, for the moment, let's first talk about the presentation. Mr. Paulides, get thee to an editor! I looked for an editor credit and it was also "Missing," and there was much that made me want to volunteer my own humble services, though I am myself not an editor. So there were challenges for me that should not have been there, IMO, and there was much that could have been improved, like footnotes, and cross-referencing. But all grammatical challenges should have been removed especially when one is presenting unusual, fringe, or controversial ideas. As for the content itself, I had so many questions, ... so many questions, ... We are given little mysteries, and there is never enough data for reasonable explanations, ... and yet our human minds are always seeking closure, answers, someplace to rest. I saw my own mind frequently leap towards "paranormal" explanations. But I only ever had the information that Mr. Paulides has given us, and yes it is the nature of a mystery that data is missing, but we can only guess at whatever information filtering processes were at work. But he is an experienced investigator, so we have to trust him, ... So, the premise is there are quite a large number of people who are disappearing mostly from rural areas in or very near national parks in North America and Canada. The missing that fit Paulides criteria are either never seen again, or are found dead under mysterious circumstances, or they are found and are unable to explain what happened to them. Looking at thousands of cases, David Paulides started to see many recurring themes and patterns to these stories. And despite large numbers of folks going missing in parks, the National Park Service claims to have no records of this phenomenon. But to his credit, and our frustration, Mr. Paulides does not offer any explanations. Instead, he peppers his "just-the-facts"style of writing with tantalizing comments, as readers grope for answers. I was left wanting more, ... which could have been the intention. ...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Taddow

    David Paulides continues to present strange and concerning true stories of missing people in the U.S. and Canada. Like the first book, I was hooked on this book and quickly read through it (looking forward to reading the next section with a sense of fascination and dread at the same time). One critique that I do have is that I am glad that I read the first (Western) book first as the author goes into some common trends and possible explanations regarding some of the case studies that he does not David Paulides continues to present strange and concerning true stories of missing people in the U.S. and Canada. Like the first book, I was hooked on this book and quickly read through it (looking forward to reading the next section with a sense of fascination and dread at the same time). One critique that I do have is that I am glad that I read the first (Western) book first as the author goes into some common trends and possible explanations regarding some of the case studies that he does not elaborate on in this book. This would only be a potential issue if the first book was not read prior to this one.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Scorpianmuse

    Just like the West Coast version, these books by Paulides are thoroughly engaging and seriously, I read both in a little more than 12 hours each (the other is the West Coast). These are the tales that we don't hear much about and seem to quickly be removed from the media. The tales of accurate records and failure of the FOIA inquiries makes the reader wonder just what the National Parks Service and others are really hiding. Makes you think twice about skirting out on your own, or even with a bud Just like the West Coast version, these books by Paulides are thoroughly engaging and seriously, I read both in a little more than 12 hours each (the other is the West Coast). These are the tales that we don't hear much about and seem to quickly be removed from the media. The tales of accurate records and failure of the FOIA inquiries makes the reader wonder just what the National Parks Service and others are really hiding. Makes you think twice about skirting out on your own, or even with a buddy or small group, in our wilderness. Some of just down right chilling.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa *the Pixie Princess*

    This is some next level X-Files sh...stuff right here. But this isn't fiction- this is real. People going missing in the wilderness under bizarre circumstances and if they are found, those circumstances are equally puzzling. My library only has this one book of the series in its system so I have begged them to get all the other installments because: "The truth is out there." "Trust no one."

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bookfan53

    This is the second book I have read and the cases just get stranger. There may be some cases that could be down to people losing their way, or getting lost while out hunting, hiking etc but more than a few of these cases just do not make sense to me. I think the author has done an awful lot of research and is trying to get a database set up where missing people in National Parks will have their details stored. I find it quite surprising that this is not done (unless the local police perhaps keep This is the second book I have read and the cases just get stranger. There may be some cases that could be down to people losing their way, or getting lost while out hunting, hiking etc but more than a few of these cases just do not make sense to me. I think the author has done an awful lot of research and is trying to get a database set up where missing people in National Parks will have their details stored. I find it quite surprising that this is not done (unless the local police perhaps keep a record). Anyway, the author is trying to raise the profile of these cases and I cannot fault him for that. It is so sad for those left behind, who are left with more questions than answers as to what happened to their loved ones and the children's cases are really frightening. Not a book for people who are off a sensitive disposition. I have actually chosen a completely different type of book for my next read, just to get my mind off this subject for a while. It was just really sad reading many of the cases. I do hope the author continues his work. Someone needs to remember the missing and it should not just be the family or friends. It is a terrible thing when no one cares.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brian S.

    I purchased this book from North American Bigfoot Search, Amazon sells it from 103 - $70 for the Western book. Therefore I wondered how could anybody review this book at the outrageous price people wanted to sell it for. The author uses conventional resources to research each individua.l THE New York Times and local Community papers provide information into the details of each missing person. The author reviews information about berry pickers farmers and sheep herders. After each review he states I purchased this book from North American Bigfoot Search, Amazon sells it from 103 - $70 for the Western book. Therefore I wondered how could anybody review this book at the outrageous price people wanted to sell it for. The author uses conventional resources to research each individua.l THE New York Times and local Community papers provide information into the details of each missing person. The author reviews information about berry pickers farmers and sheep herders. After each review he states what is obvious and then goes into the discrepancies of each case. So far the book is well written and very logical

  12. 4 out of 5

    Babaylon Moon Goddess 🌙

    just as engrossing and haunting as the previous Western Edition, impossible to stop reading cant wait to get the third in the series!! Thank you for writing these David Pauldies!!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jorge A.

    No doubt, disappearances happen, but not at the alarming rate and strange patterns you will read about once you go through this book. Read it!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Weaver

    order from http://www.canammissing.com/ (also on Amazon, but price-gouging very bad there on these books) A person is there one moment, but gone the next. Untrackable by any means we currently have. Later found dead, or sometimes in a groggy state, unable to reveal what happened to them. It's pretty hard to ignore what this nonfictional book has to say; having once been made aware of these true missing-person accounts by lawman-turned-investigative-journalist David Paulides, you want to see the w order from http://www.canammissing.com/ (also on Amazon, but price-gouging very bad there on these books) A person is there one moment, but gone the next. Untrackable by any means we currently have. Later found dead, or sometimes in a groggy state, unable to reveal what happened to them. It's pretty hard to ignore what this nonfictional book has to say; having once been made aware of these true missing-person accounts by lawman-turned-investigative-journalist David Paulides, you want to see the whole phenomenom of people going missing with strange circumstances surrounding their disappearance conclude. But it's not; there are new cases that fit the author's profile almost daily in the news. I work in publishing, so I will say this series sometimes lacks literary polish, editing finesse or visual punch; but I must stress that these quickly lose meaning against the expert vetting, the complex, SHOCKING details, and the enigmatic profile developed towards the STRANGE DISAPPEARANCES and DEATHS in these books... and how they reach into your mind and won't let go. Something is going on here, and we have no idea how to stop it. Many have taken place in our national parks and forests. Though some park employees tried to help the searches, you’ll come to see the authorities of the National Park Service as unconcerned, free of ethics and rather criminally negligent towards folks gone missing or found dead in their parks, which is not the image they'd like to project as they plan various “100th anniversary” events and invite families to come traipse through their wildernesses. Human scale is a character here: what are people, especially children, capable of physically doing in certain amounts of time? What don’t we know about their disappearance, and why aren’t there clues? Why do the parks not advertise the persons gone missing within their borders? Also, the loss and pain of the families left behind is not forgotten by this former police detective, and many interviews with heartbroken loved ones are faithfully included. Oddities abound. All cases are real, not composites or “re-imaginings,” and are located in places most of us have either been already or have dreamed of going. Many will leave you emotionally stunned; you think, “I've done that,” or “I've been there!” It never escapes you for a minute that you, or your loved ones, could also have been a page in this book. It's brutal going, yet mesmerizing, because each case starts out with absolutely ordinary past-times – most of us have hiked, camped, hunted, played outside or picked berries – yet all finish with a situation, very often death, that cannot be explained by any of the persons involved. I can't really use the word “enjoyed” about the long, late hours I spent, eyeballs watery and twitching, reading this book, and the others in the series. But I did, and still do, feel a profound sense of involvement and mental challenge at mulling the details, and a driving NEED to figure out HOW these things could have happened, and WHAT could be the reasons. At first, the “answers” come the way our minds are trained and ready to answer (wild animals - weather conditions - psycho killers - UFOs - Bigfoot - demons- etc - fill in your own as you go), but keep with the series and you will see that NO ONE HAS THE ACTUAL ANSWERS to these baffling occurrences to ordinary people just like you and me. I don't think I will EVER forget these books. ***NOTE: This book, and the others in the series, are BEST PURCHASED FROM THE WEBSITE mentioned above.***

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Dalo

    I met author David Paulides a few months ago at a speaking event. We spoke about the documentary he’s making based on this series of books, and he kindly signed a copy of his book for me, signing it “Hike with a new awareness.” He came off as a very confident and headstrong person, but also kind. But let’s get to the review. Missing 411 is a series of books about the phenomena of strange and unexplained missing person’s reports throughout North America. The subject this book delves into is fascin I met author David Paulides a few months ago at a speaking event. We spoke about the documentary he’s making based on this series of books, and he kindly signed a copy of his book for me, signing it “Hike with a new awareness.” He came off as a very confident and headstrong person, but also kind. But let’s get to the review. Missing 411 is a series of books about the phenomena of strange and unexplained missing person’s reports throughout North America. The subject this book delves into is fascinating. It goes into the mystery of how all of these people went missing, and especially unexplainable is the circumstances and details surrounding a lot of these cases. The author does a decent job at just displaying the facts and allowing the reader to come to their own conclusions, although sometimes some patterns are talked about that I just felt like were more correlation and less causation. This book definitely leaves you with more questions than answers, but you do learn a lot about the phenomenon. The formatting of the book itself could’ve used some work: there are punctuation mistakes for example (periods are missing at the end of sentences at times etc.) Also, all the data can be jumbled around which makes it a little hard to follow sometimes. I think overall it could have been organized a little better. It was also tough to read this book at times, especially late at night. You remember that these were real people and if you try to put yourself in their shoes and think about what they experienced, it can be frightening and my heart goes out to the families of those people mentioned in the book. Honestly though, I had to skip a decent portion of the end of the book. The subject can be depressing after a while. It reminded me of when I visited the Catacombs in Paris. It’s spooky, and your morbid curiosity takes you there, but you soon want to get back out. It becomes too depressing, too heavy. The cases also become extremely repetitive. I’m not belittling anyone’s missing persons story or experience, but he could’ve edited out a lot of them, keeping the most unusual cases in the book and had a much more easily read book. Check it out if you’re into the phenomenon.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alysha

    This is one I'll read and read again! So much detail and hard work put into this book. If you're obsessed with unsolved mysteries, you need this in your library!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kate Louise Powell

    This is the first time in a very long time I have felt compelled to write a long review for a book! I am giving this 5 stars because of how gripped was by it, how moved, scared, and baffled I felt reading it, and how much this book further peaked my curiosity (after watching the two Missing 411 documentaries, and listening to hours of interviews with David Paulides). I don’t think this book is flawless by any means - the way it’s put together is quite unimpressive in places - and I try to remain This is the first time in a very long time I have felt compelled to write a long review for a book! I am giving this 5 stars because of how gripped was by it, how moved, scared, and baffled I felt reading it, and how much this book further peaked my curiosity (after watching the two Missing 411 documentaries, and listening to hours of interviews with David Paulides). I don’t think this book is flawless by any means - the way it’s put together is quite unimpressive in places - and I try to remain skeptical and sensible, especially of the author and how he presents information. Despite all this, I gave the book 5 stars, as I can’t remember the last time I felt this immersed in and deeply interested in a mystery. Firstly, the negatives: One of the initial impressions I got from the book was that Paulides really could have benefited from a more thorough editor and better graphic designer. There are a few grammar mistakes peppered throughout (I remember thinking a surname was spelled incorrectly at one point too - it was spelled differently in the case description and the case header) and the way lists are formatted on the page makes them pretty difficult to absorb. There are several lists of the missing people included throughout the book, with basic info such as sex, age and incident date included, but these are presented casually with each entry typed out beneath the other in a way which means the info isn’t aligned neatly. At the end of the book Paulides presents huge lists of all the cases and invites the reader to be a sleuth and look over them, but I think these lists would benefit from being presented in a tidy graph, making entries easier to study and compare to find possible patterns. I’m not sure if this is something that is improved in the more recent books. Another small thing I noted was that the cover itself includes some pixellated images which doesn’t look very professional (this is a bit of a nit-pick, but hey ho). At first I wasn’t sure about the author’s occasional casual interjections in the text, expressing his confusion and exasperation, but these quickly grew on me and I ended up finding them quite charming and a welcome relief from the otherwise heavy and often frightening reading material. I have read up on the mini controversies surrounding Paulides and looked into the things which cast doubt on his integrity and the integrity of his books. When reading the book I kept in mind that we are taking DP at his word and putting trust in him to retell these cases honestly and without embellishment, as it’s quite tricky to fact-check the more obscure cases (I tried googling a couple of the older cases to find out more info and found next to NOTHING online) and compare DP’s wording to other articles. I have read forums where people pick up on errors DP makes when describing the cases in his spoken interviews, though to me, this seems like an honest mix-up due to the fact that he has covered thousands of (often very similar) cases, and is only human. However, I have also read the forums where people show a couple of examples where DP seems to deliberately leave out info which could point to a more ‘logical’ explanation, such as suicide or even murder, and this is harder to excuse. When I read about the latter, I was disappointed, and kept this in mind with every case I read about in the book (“This COULD be an exaggeration, this COULD be another case where he leaves out some information which points to a logical conclusion…”), but in the end, this niggling doubt didn’t stop me being deeply compelled and disturbed by what I was reading. One thing I didn’t expect when going into the first book was the sheer number of cases that are included; reading case after case after case (sometimes 3 short ones across a 2-page spread) left me feeling utterly overwhelmed. If the book had included 20-or-so stories, and doubt had been cast on 2 or 3 of them, I would be far less interested in what is going on. Instead, the book was comprised of HUNDREDS of unsolved cases, strange coincidences and eerie similarities, repeated HUNDREDS of times over the last 150+ years. Whilst reading it, I thought to myself that even if 10+% of all the stories were slightly twisted by DP in some way, this (whatever 'this' is) is still absolutely massive. I don’t doubt that some cases are imperfectly retold in the book, but the sheer amount of cases overall and the similarities and mysteries tied up in them make the topic extremely compelling and chilling nonetheless. Personally, I don’t believe DP is a scheming or deceitful person, it is my opinion that he is extremely passionate about the subject matter, and perhaps got a bit carried away in pruning the details of a few of the cases to fit his profile points. Then again, there are also die-hard DP fans who claim that anyone casting doubt on how he reports cases are themselves liars who are dishonestly trying to muddy the waters, and don’t have the evidence to back up claims that DP is twisting some of the cases. Who knows? It took me roughly 30 pages before I properly got ‘into' the book and how the cases are presented, and after that I was hooked. There is a brief introduction before the book launches into the stories of the missing, and after that it is a sheer barrage of pain, loss, exasperation, puzzlement, death, and also - where the missing are found alive - relief. Pretty much every case in the book is head-scratching in some way, and most are arguably overwhelming in their strangeness. The detail of each story varies significantly between some cases, with some being very brief and others spanning several pages with immersive descriptions (this often depends on when the disappearance occurred, with some happening in the 1800s), and some are also accompanied by photographs. It’s extremely easy to blast through the book, there is a strong sense of momentum, and some of the stand-out cases are enough to keep you up at night. I took paper tabs and stuck them on 30-40 stories that really sent a chill down my spine. Though there are certain stories that are completely bizarre as stand-alone cases, stepping back and looking at the bigger picture is even more alarming. I found the Coast-to-Coast AM interviews with David and Missing 411 films very interesting, but reading a book which covers SO many cases is a whole other kettle of fish, and it really begs the question of what is happening to these people. I can’t wait to read more. The cases in this book I found especially strange are as follows: Rose Jewett, Mabel Moffitt, Jake Pike, Kory Kelly, Roy Bilgrien, Katie Flynn, Carol Van Hulla, LLoyd Neal Hokit, Ernest Matthew Cook, Gloria McDonald, Nora Moore, Christopher Thompkins, Trenny Lynn Gibson, Mark Hanson, Brad Lavies, Eloise Lindsay, Dennis Lloyd Martin, Abraham Lincoln Ramsay, Jay Charles Toney, Else Flothmeier, Eldridge Albright, Billy Abbott, Otis T. Mason, Jackie Copeland, Karen Cooney, Harold Mott, Duane Scott, Elsie M. Davis, David Brown, Alden Johnson, Louis Dunton, Andrew Warburton, Alfred J. Bishop, Carl Herrick, Freida Langer, George William ‘Billy’ Dansey I am definitely more of a Mulder than a Scully, I am enthralled by the idea that something supernatural/inexplainable is at play here, and am perhaps too easily drawn into mysteries... but I can’t think of anyone I know who would read this cover-to-cover and not be baffled and concerned. This book has its flaws - it isn’t edited amazingly, the length and tone of the case reports aren’t consistent, etc. - and it’s definitely important that we are open to criticisms of the author, but I still feel compelled to give it 5 stars and recommend it to any curious readers.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lea

    Apparently the second of David Paulides four "Missing 411" books, didn't realize I was reading out of order -- however, because I'd already listened to many of the author's interviews I didn't have any trouble understanding the ideas and details presented in this book. Primarily a listing of information in specific missing persons cases, this sort of book could be very dry, but this one isn't. The strangeness of the disappearances Paulides highlights in his works are compelling, even as you see t Apparently the second of David Paulides four "Missing 411" books, didn't realize I was reading out of order -- however, because I'd already listened to many of the author's interviews I didn't have any trouble understanding the ideas and details presented in this book. Primarily a listing of information in specific missing persons cases, this sort of book could be very dry, but this one isn't. The strangeness of the disappearances Paulides highlights in his works are compelling, even as you see the same scenarios repeated -- part of the weirdness in these cases is how the same bizarre details show up over and over again. The author -- a former police investigator -- presents the facts of each case, sometimes stopping to raise questions about the various details or in the handling of the search and rescue operation. He doesn't really speculate on exactly WHAT is going on in these disappearances. Obviously, I would love to have him state outright what he thinks is going on, but Paulides leaves room for the reader to draw his or her own conclusions. When I bought these books, I wondered if the repetition of facts would prove a bit dull, but I'm excited to read the rest of the series -- even if it is all much the same as this book, I find it interesting enough to read more. Just as a side note, a previous reviewer mentioned how expensive these books are -- not so. They are only expensive if purchased through a well known large online retailer. The author's own site sells them at a reasonable price.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    Oh boy. So, not quite worthy of three stars, but deserving of more than two. What can I say that other reviewers have not? I agree that the research is sloppy. Paul definitely needs to invest in an editor or at least run a spell check. A little consistency in the writing and presentation of data would be nice as well. There were several points he kept bringing up that made me cringe and not want to take him seriously. For example: he kept repeating that it was weird or inexplicable that the missin Oh boy. So, not quite worthy of three stars, but deserving of more than two. What can I say that other reviewers have not? I agree that the research is sloppy. Paul definitely needs to invest in an editor or at least run a spell check. A little consistency in the writing and presentation of data would be nice as well. There were several points he kept bringing up that made me cringe and not want to take him seriously. For example: he kept repeating that it was weird or inexplicable that the missing kept removing all of parts of their clothes, especially on cold nights. This is actually a common reaction from victims of hypothermia. He also kept drawing similarities between disappearances of people that were decades apart... and coming up with patterns that I just wasn’t seeing/were not really patterns. If you look past the conspiracy theory case summaries, this was a pretty interesting read. There were several cases that made me shiver a bit (like the girl who said she was perused for three weeks by a group of men or the official who said he knew of wild men living in the mountains/woods). I don’t think it was anywhere near worth the price plus shipping from his shop, and certainly not worth the second hand scalper prices you see on eBay and Amazon. If I can find some of these at a library or for a reasonable second hand price, I’ll probably read more.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Miriam B. Sayer

    First off, I'm a very generous reviewer. Damn it, I LOVE books. But I haven't been this enraged at a book (for different reasons) since the Plague Dogs. Something about the Plague Dogs upset her......but what? She could've given this book a better review, but.....why NOT? I don't believe in coincidences... I read a lot about disappearances, and I mostly enjoyed reading it (She said mostly....how come?) I found these interesting, and very heartbreaking. And this is on the author ONLY: Shoddy resea First off, I'm a very generous reviewer. Damn it, I LOVE books. But I haven't been this enraged at a book (for different reasons) since the Plague Dogs. Something about the Plague Dogs upset her......but what? She could've given this book a better review, but.....why NOT? I don't believe in coincidences... I read a lot about disappearances, and I mostly enjoyed reading it (She said mostly....how come?) I found these interesting, and very heartbreaking. And this is on the author ONLY: Shoddy research. I am the stupidest person in the west. It took me 5 minutes to find Barofsky's first name, family, previous addresses, and if he had a family he obviously lived (BONUS, to the first person who answers Barofsky's information. Shame the devil! (she might be sarcastic......but why? I detected snark....but how come........Something pissed her off.....but what?)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Briere

    This is an AMAZING READ, Scary, but True stories of missing children and Adults. Very odd facts that are similar in most all of the cases of the missing. National Parks won't talk, nor give information to the investigators. It will make you think twice about going into the woods near National or close to National Parks. Can't wait to get the Missing 411 (Western Region) book. I pray for all the family's that have lost their loved ones.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth

    I really enjoyed this book. It is an encyclopedia of missing persons under bizarre circumstances. It sure gave me the chills. I will now read the book on western disappearances, which supposedly came first in the series. At times the details became repetitive, but I was hooked until the end. I went to the internet to research many of his cases, and they are how he presented them.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Herzog

    This book purports to document hundreds of mysteriously missing people over the course of more than 100 years. The author finds patterns in missing very young children, people in rural often swampy areas with berry patches. He seems to be suggesting that there are groups of "wild men" who may be abducting these people The book is highly speculative and just plain weird.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cat.

    I have to get this back to the owning library, so I skimmed the middle and read the conclusions. Interesting. Not sure I'm buying what the author's selling for the most part, but there are some weird occurrences over the past 100 or so years with people disappearing either permanently or temporarily. Kind of makes you not want to go for a walk in the woods alone anytime soon.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Noreen

    These books are so creepy interesting. These are unsolved cases of deaths/disappearances. The cases on the East coast are much different than those in the West. They are mostly young men who end up dead in some type of water. Mystifying and unsolved.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jay Rice

    Wow...just Wow! This book puts together many cases of missing persons from all over the Eastern United States that seem to have many similarities. Very interesting read...it will definitely make you stop and think. I've read and re-read this book 3 times. I highly recommend!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mallory

    This is a non-fiction book about people who have mysteriously disappeared in North America, often in forests and rural areas and in the company of others. The author, David Paulides, is a former detective who has been analyzing these cases and questioning how and why people just vanish without a trace - sometimes being found, but more often than not never being seen again. This book will not be for everyone but it is a GREAT reference book for missing persons cases and is very intriguing and a l This is a non-fiction book about people who have mysteriously disappeared in North America, often in forests and rural areas and in the company of others. The author, David Paulides, is a former detective who has been analyzing these cases and questioning how and why people just vanish without a trace - sometimes being found, but more often than not never being seen again. This book will not be for everyone but it is a GREAT reference book for missing persons cases and is very intriguing and a little irksome. The book is divided into parts by U.S. state, region, and by case similarities. As mentioned, the author is a former detective, and his writing style is reflective of writing police reports - full of facts and straight to the point. This did not bother me, but others may not like this narrative style. I have heard this author speak about his investigations on missing persons and he cares deeply about his work and this book reflects that. If you need any more reason to be wary and cautious of going into wooded areas, mountains, or rural areas - check this book out and think twice about camping or hiking.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rowan

    Loved it. Factual, great information on numerous cases. This will change your life after reading cases about Missing people from various National Parks. This will forever change my view of them, unfortunately. I will never go walking alone in the woods. I will be very very careful about where I camp and how far away I am from people in general. People in these books fall into 1 of 3 categories. Never Found - Still Missing, Missing - Found Dead, and then Missing - Found Alive but they do not reme Loved it. Factual, great information on numerous cases. This will change your life after reading cases about Missing people from various National Parks. This will forever change my view of them, unfortunately. I will never go walking alone in the woods. I will be very very careful about where I camp and how far away I am from people in general. People in these books fall into 1 of 3 categories. Never Found - Still Missing, Missing - Found Dead, and then Missing - Found Alive but they do not remember a thing about being "gone". Sometimes for weeks or days in the woods...what is taking them? Where? Who is in the woods that can alter a human's mind? Government? Dogmen? Crypt-ids? ETs? You will not find a theory in here - that is up to you. Men, women, kids are missing and some people in the Forest Service seem to be covering it up. As citizens we should have answers. Why is the FBI involved in some of these cases yet don't want to share information? This will make your head spin.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    I would have given this book 5 stars but my copy had about four duplicate pages and for the amount that the book costs, I feel like it should have been looked over better. Otherwise, this is the second book in the Missing 411 series and is just as intriguing as the first one, if not more. I feel that the Eastern United States disappearances have both similarities to the Western ones as well as differences that make them even more disturbing. The fact that so many people have disappeared in such I would have given this book 5 stars but my copy had about four duplicate pages and for the amount that the book costs, I feel like it should have been looked over better. Otherwise, this is the second book in the Missing 411 series and is just as intriguing as the first one, if not more. I feel that the Eastern United States disappearances have both similarities to the Western ones as well as differences that make them even more disturbing. The fact that so many people have disappeared in such a manner, many of them young children, in such a mysterious manner is...perplexing to put it mildly. And these are just cases that fit a certain profile. I definitely look forward to reading the rest of the books in the series. David Paulides research into this is fascinating.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    This book much like the other one I read this year lists all missing persons in or near National Parks, with this one geared to one in the Eastern United States. Some of these case can of course probably be explained away but others leave lots of questions and of course not many answers. I loved the book though and probably would have given it five stars but at times it did seem to drag along and then at the end some of the pages were printed twice and I had to pay attention to page numbers to ma This book much like the other one I read this year lists all missing persons in or near National Parks, with this one geared to one in the Eastern United States. Some of these case can of course probably be explained away but others leave lots of questions and of course not many answers. I loved the book though and probably would have given it five stars but at times it did seem to drag along and then at the end some of the pages were printed twice and I had to pay attention to page numbers to make sure I was reading the correct page and not a repeat of what I had just read.

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