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Road through Kurdistan: The Narrative of an Engineer in Iraq

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In 1928, Archibald Hamilton traveled to Iraqi Kurdistan, having been commissioned to build a road that would stretch from Northern Iraq, through the mountains and gorges of Kurdistan and on to the Iranian border. Now called the Hamilton Road, this was, even by today's standards, a considerable feat of engineering and remains one of the most strategically important roads in In 1928, Archibald Hamilton traveled to Iraqi Kurdistan, having been commissioned to build a road that would stretch from Northern Iraq, through the mountains and gorges of Kurdistan and on to the Iranian border. Now called the Hamilton Road, this was, even by today's standards, a considerable feat of engineering and remains one of the most strategically important roads in the region. In this colorful and engaging account, Hamilton describes the four years he spent overcoming immense obstacles--disease, ferocious brigands, warring tribes and bureaucratic officials--to carve a path through some of the most beautiful but inhospitable landscape in the world. Road Through Kurdistan is a classic of travel writing and an invaluable portrayal of the Iraqi Kurds themselves, and of the Kurdish regions of Northern Iraq.


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In 1928, Archibald Hamilton traveled to Iraqi Kurdistan, having been commissioned to build a road that would stretch from Northern Iraq, through the mountains and gorges of Kurdistan and on to the Iranian border. Now called the Hamilton Road, this was, even by today's standards, a considerable feat of engineering and remains one of the most strategically important roads in In 1928, Archibald Hamilton traveled to Iraqi Kurdistan, having been commissioned to build a road that would stretch from Northern Iraq, through the mountains and gorges of Kurdistan and on to the Iranian border. Now called the Hamilton Road, this was, even by today's standards, a considerable feat of engineering and remains one of the most strategically important roads in the region. In this colorful and engaging account, Hamilton describes the four years he spent overcoming immense obstacles--disease, ferocious brigands, warring tribes and bureaucratic officials--to carve a path through some of the most beautiful but inhospitable landscape in the world. Road Through Kurdistan is a classic of travel writing and an invaluable portrayal of the Iraqi Kurds themselves, and of the Kurdish regions of Northern Iraq.

38 review for Road through Kurdistan: The Narrative of an Engineer in Iraq

  1. 4 out of 5

    Billy

    I really loved this book. Written in the 1930s, this book gives insight into one of the great engineering feats accomplished in Northern Iraq opening the door of Kurdistan to the world. Having lived in the Diana river valley for two years, everything that Hamilton writes stands out for me in sharp relief as I use "his" road nearly every day. You will be pleased to learn that the language of the engineer of the 1930s puts to shame the poet of our age as Hamilton draws word pictures for the reader t I really loved this book. Written in the 1930s, this book gives insight into one of the great engineering feats accomplished in Northern Iraq opening the door of Kurdistan to the world. Having lived in the Diana river valley for two years, everything that Hamilton writes stands out for me in sharp relief as I use "his" road nearly every day. You will be pleased to learn that the language of the engineer of the 1930s puts to shame the poet of our age as Hamilton draws word pictures for the reader that makes one wonder whether the book shouldn't be placed in an art gallery. I cannot recommend this book more highly for understanding the Kurdish culture, their tribal ways, Kurdish history of the day, and the triumphal feat of spanning a road within what some believed to be the most beautiful gorge in all of Asia. It is simply a joy. What a book!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kawing

    Probably not really an appealing travel writing for anyone who's not interested in WWI era engineering or the history of the Kurds - but what is really valuable is the description about the Kurdish way of life in Kurdistan, and the interaction between the author and his companions (foreigners) and the kurds at the time. I followed much of the road in Iraqi-Kurdistan a couple of years back - and was pleasantly surprised that much of the landscape remains untouched. With the recent development of t Probably not really an appealing travel writing for anyone who's not interested in WWI era engineering or the history of the Kurds - but what is really valuable is the description about the Kurdish way of life in Kurdistan, and the interaction between the author and his companions (foreigners) and the kurds at the time. I followed much of the road in Iraqi-Kurdistan a couple of years back - and was pleasantly surprised that much of the landscape remains untouched. With the recent development of the Syrian Civil War - the dream of a ropad connecting Kurdistan to the Mediterranean - might not be a dream after all.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ferwerdin Barzanji

    It's one of the Must read books specially for those want to know about us, Kurds

  4. 5 out of 5

    Arjun

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chia

  6. 5 out of 5

    Samuel

  7. 5 out of 5

    Martin

  8. 4 out of 5

    Phil Ammar

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rob

  10. 5 out of 5

    Corvin Ninua

  11. 5 out of 5

    Joanne Payton

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jeane

  13. 4 out of 5

    Diego

  14. 5 out of 5

    Hazhar

  15. 4 out of 5

    J V

  16. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Simmons

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nawras

  18. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

  19. 4 out of 5

    KF

  20. 4 out of 5

    Chalak

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sirwan ALI

  22. 5 out of 5

    Hoshang

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mahdi Aziz

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rasha Adil

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ashraf Maklad

  26. 4 out of 5

    Omed

  27. 4 out of 5

    Robert Milne

  28. 4 out of 5

    Najmoddin

  29. 5 out of 5

    Philipp

  30. 4 out of 5

    Barz Wahid

  31. 4 out of 5

    Aliyah

  32. 5 out of 5

    Joan Salihi

  33. 4 out of 5

    Tom

  34. 4 out of 5

    Seacoast

  35. 4 out of 5

    Aram

  36. 4 out of 5

    Hastiar

  37. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

  38. 4 out of 5

    Sheridan

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