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Baba Yaga: A Russian Folktale

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A disarmingly direct and authentic introduction to the well-known witch. . . . Arnold emulates traditional Russion 'lubok' art . . . in a vivid, energetic style that's a beautiful complement to the lively story. Sure to draw readers with its jewel-bright colors and pleasingly gruesome witch.--Kirkus. Full color. A disarmingly direct and authentic introduction to the well-known witch. . . . Arnold emulates traditional Russion 'lubok' art . . . in a vivid, energetic style that's a beautiful complement to the lively story. Sure to draw readers with its jewel-bright colors and pleasingly gruesome witch.--Kirkus. Full color.


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A disarmingly direct and authentic introduction to the well-known witch. . . . Arnold emulates traditional Russion 'lubok' art . . . in a vivid, energetic style that's a beautiful complement to the lively story. Sure to draw readers with its jewel-bright colors and pleasingly gruesome witch.--Kirkus. Full color. A disarmingly direct and authentic introduction to the well-known witch. . . . Arnold emulates traditional Russion 'lubok' art . . . in a vivid, energetic style that's a beautiful complement to the lively story. Sure to draw readers with its jewel-bright colors and pleasingly gruesome witch.--Kirkus. Full color.

30 review for Baba Yaga: A Russian Folktale

  1. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    Based upon the traditional Russian tale of Tereshichka, collected by noted folklorist Alexander Afanasyev in the nineteenth century, this beautifully-illustrated picture-book opens with the story of an older couple who so long for a child that they take a piece of wood, wrap it in a flannel blanket, and place it in a cradle. Imagine their surprise when they find a living baby in its place, the next morning! As Tishka grows up, his mother - wanting to keep him safe - warns him of the evil witch B Based upon the traditional Russian tale of Tereshichka, collected by noted folklorist Alexander Afanasyev in the nineteenth century, this beautifully-illustrated picture-book opens with the story of an older couple who so long for a child that they take a piece of wood, wrap it in a flannel blanket, and place it in a cradle. Imagine their surprise when they find a living baby in its place, the next morning! As Tishka grows up, his mother - wanting to keep him safe - warns him of the evil witch Baba Yaga, but when he falls into her hands as the result of trickery, and finds himself about to be roasted for her dinner, the clever young boy must think quickly, if he is to escape... As Katya Arnold notes in her introduction, Baba Yaga is an immensely important figure in Russian folklore, one who can be either benign or malevolent. Here she clearly appears in her most terrifying guise, as the baby-eating monster. The bold illustrations, which really emphasize the grotesquerie of the tale, are done in the lubok style of Russian folk-art. This one is well worth the time of Russian folklore enthusiasts, particularly those with an interest in Baba Yaga!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I enjoyed reading this Russian folktale retold an illustrated by Katya Arnold. The bright and bold illustrations are "Lubok" style and that is what pulled me into the story. The details, size and extremely bright colorful illustrations jumped out of each page! I also enjoyed the folk rhymes that the characters repeated in the tale. The somewhat humorous folktale leads us to believe that a little piece of wood can become a human child. This clever child wins us over by outsmarting an ugly, powerf I enjoyed reading this Russian folktale retold an illustrated by Katya Arnold. The bright and bold illustrations are "Lubok" style and that is what pulled me into the story. The details, size and extremely bright colorful illustrations jumped out of each page! I also enjoyed the folk rhymes that the characters repeated in the tale. The somewhat humorous folktale leads us to believe that a little piece of wood can become a human child. This clever child wins us over by outsmarting an ugly, powerful, and scary witch. The description of the witch having iron teeth, a metal tongue, and the ability to eat children is quite frightening, but I would agree that the Baba Yaga story is memorable and unique.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Marina Minina

    In the introduction Katya explained that “the text of this book is based primarily on a story called ‘Tereshichka,’ which I translated and retold from Russian folktales collected by Alexandr Afanas’ev…Tereshichka is the name of the young boy, but I have changed it to ‘Tishka’ to make it easier to pronounce.” An old man and an old woman were alone because they didn’t have children. One day they found a little piece of wood and imagined that it was their child. One morning they heard a cry and fou In the introduction Katya explained that “the text of this book is based primarily on a story called ‘Tereshichka,’ which I translated and retold from Russian folktales collected by Alexandr Afanas’ev…Tereshichka is the name of the young boy, but I have changed it to ‘Tishka’ to make it easier to pronounce.” An old man and an old woman were alone because they didn’t have children. One day they found a little piece of wood and imagined that it was their child. One morning they heard a cry and found a boy and called him Tishka. One day Baba Yaga grabbed Tishka on the shore and brought him to her hut that stood on chicken’s legs. And asked her daughter to cook Tishka for supper. The boy was clever and he cooked her daughter and ran away. Baba Yaga got angry and followed him. But he took a gees? and got home. He promised the gees to give the best food and care and Tishka kept the promise. So in comparison to other book, in this book Baba Yaga has a daughter, and the main character is a boy not a girl. Within the invitation students should notice these facts comparing books included in the text-set about Baba Yaga. As for the illustrations, they are authentic. In one of the pictures I have found a Russian church and a table with a samovar. Besides, as the author said that she was inspired by “lubok” pictures, a type of Russian folk art that first appeared in the 17th century.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    Baba Yaga is a perennial figure in Russian folklore, appearing in hundreds of folktales, sometimes as a witch, flying over the countryside in a mortar and pestle--yep, you heard me correctly, a mortar and pestle--sometimes benign and helpful. Katya Arnold has translated an well as illustrated this particular story. These illustrations are done in a style that mimics "lubok" pictures, a type of 17th century folk art using hand-colored woodcuts. I found the crude shapes and bold coloring very appea Baba Yaga is a perennial figure in Russian folklore, appearing in hundreds of folktales, sometimes as a witch, flying over the countryside in a mortar and pestle--yep, you heard me correctly, a mortar and pestle--sometimes benign and helpful. Katya Arnold has translated an well as illustrated this particular story. These illustrations are done in a style that mimics "lubok" pictures, a type of 17th century folk art using hand-colored woodcuts. I found the crude shapes and bold coloring very appealing. If you like folktales, this picture book is well worth your time.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dolly

    This is an entertaining Russian folktale about the witch Baba Yaga. The story was interesting and the woodcut-like illustrations are wonderful. I really enjoyed reading the author's note at the beginning of the story that explains more about the Baba Yaga character in Russian culture and literature and the reason why she chose to use "lubok" pictures for this story. We enjoyed reading this story together. This is an entertaining Russian folktale about the witch Baba Yaga. The story was interesting and the woodcut-like illustrations are wonderful. I really enjoyed reading the author's note at the beginning of the story that explains more about the Baba Yaga character in Russian culture and literature and the reason why she chose to use "lubok" pictures for this story. We enjoyed reading this story together.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kacey Marshall

    I thought Baba Yaga by Katya Arnold was a little inappropriate for young children. The story line is very similar to that of Hansel and Gretel, however, it is much more graphic in its cannibalistic details. Also, the illustrations were not visually stimulating. Though they represented what was occurring in the story, I thought the artwork was very plain and mediocre. I would not recommend this story to anyone.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Creepy Russian folktale about Baba Yaga and her child-stealing ways - illustrated in a rough sketchy style.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Hanley

    The most interesting feature of this book was the illustrations, which are rich in color and detail. The pictures were somewhat frightening, so I wouldn't read this book to small children. The most interesting feature of this book was the illustrations, which are rich in color and detail. The pictures were somewhat frightening, so I wouldn't read this book to small children.

  9. 4 out of 5

    M. Stafford

  10. 4 out of 5

    Britt Aamodt

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jenny B

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  13. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

  15. 5 out of 5

    Aidan

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

  18. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Stuart

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ɯαℓєηтуηє

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alexia

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  22. 4 out of 5

    Yvonne

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kim

  24. 4 out of 5

    Susan and Christina Keeling

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jewelia Howard

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ginny

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jasna

  28. 4 out of 5

    Elena

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bobby

  30. 5 out of 5

    Beka

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